Jump to content
Energy

Good Grid Tie Unit with Limmiter

Recommended Posts

Hi All :>

Hoping you can help. I am on the market for a grid tie inverter with limmiter.

I know of Microcare + Limmiter and Exsolar's Inverter Fronius.

I am wondering the ease of use , the Exsolar unit with its limiter seams pretty straight forward and well priced.

How is the quality and service on these units? Also can they work with any electricity meter?

Thanks Guys , Appreciate it.

Sincerely

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Energy said:

Thanks, Would this be the device: As attached,

Yes, that's the one.

We also have power limiting in the CCGX software used with the Victron Multi/Quattro, but it only works if you actually have a Multi, ie you can't use a CCGX with only a Fronius.

The protocol isn't too difficult to work with... if you're a roll-your-own kinda guy :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jay

You do not say what size of inverter you looking at and whether this is a first step in a much bigger/longer upgrade program. The Fronius inverters definitely are the "king" of GTIs. There is efficiency to consider once you add storage though. In most cases one then adds an inverter/charger with batteries and energy from solar panels is converted  from DC to AC the inverter charger converts this back to DC to charge the batteries and more often than not you convert this back to AC to use it. This may or may not be problematic depending on the size of your system and your daily requirements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's whats on my Christmas wish list: Datasheet-EasySolar-with-Color-Control-E

When coupled with a RS485 meter (to prevent exporting power into the grid) it will act as grid tie inverter.

It will invert from the PV panels DC supply and supply AC to the loads connected to its AC outputs. Whats more, it will push power out of the AC input connection of the inverter to the loads connected before the inverter - In my case this would be the loads which are too large to be supplied by a 3kva unit (geyser, stove etc).

Just a thought? Its pricier than purchasing a fronius GTI and smart meter but its a one stop solution without having to interface different bits of kit together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic Guys! Thanks for this.

I am looking at cool options Single Phase  for Small - Normal house size loads.. They have a main 60A breaker? Is this standard? How large can one go for a GTI and Solar before the GTI becomes to large for the Household? Am I correct in saying that 230V x 60 = 13.8kW and this is the maximum a normal home could theoretically consume?

Sincerely

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Energy said:

I am looking at cool options Single Phase  for Small - Normal house size loads.. They have a main 60A breaker? Is this standard? How large can one go for a GTI and Solar before the GTI becomes to large for the Household? Am I correct in saying that 230V x 60 = 13.8kW and this is the maximum a normal home could theoretically consume?

It depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you want to go solar but need a quick ROI then a system 1-1.5kW will do the trick as it will account for most homes' base load.  The bigger the system the more idle time. Having recently installed a 5kW GTI we have moved geysers, pool pump and an ancient Minus 40 deep freeze to daytime usage to ensure maximum load during the day. It is working well but I cannot imagine going bigger than 5kW in the residential GTI market. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Energy said:

How large can one go for a GTI and Solar before the GTI becomes to large for the Household?

This is in the regulations. It's nowhere near 60 amps.I think it's around 3.6kw that you are allowed to grid-tie with existing household wiring, maybe 4kw. Check with the municipality. Far as I remember, Paarl is quite a bit more open to this sort of thing than CoCT.

My prepaid meter has a built-in overload which kicks out around 15kw. In my mind that is the max normally allocated to a single-phase home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×