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The Terrible Triplett

Water harvesting and use, same logic as solar systems.

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15 minutes ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Why why why do we not listen and learn for the older more experiences generations? 

Well, you have to read all his stuff. You might not like all of it :-) The Father Brown novels are quite good though (my favourite is "The chief mourner of Marné).

I like his stuff because he has a way of looking at the world and pointing out that while you thought things were like this, actually they are the polar opposite, and when you see the paradox you gain an understanding of what the truth really is.

For example, he points out that there can be no such thing as free love (that was quite big even in the 20s). Love, in its nature, wants to bind itself to something.

He points out that it is silly to complain that man is insignificant compared to the universe. Man has always been small compared to the nearest tree. There is no reason to surrender your dignity to the universe than there is to surrender it to a whale.

The humour is quite good as well. And British.

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@gabriel, David will be my Minister of All affairs that can go Green. :-) 

 

2 minutes ago, plonkster said:

Well, you have to read all his stuff.

That is very true. I read a lot of disaster stories on Kindle, Amazon give away a lot for free. So ja, I read a lot, just from the darker side, like free love ... only when you are high on herbs with a boost of alcohol. 

The core theme over all of them, when society breaks down, virus, EMP, water, war, you can bet your last buck that everyone is going for themselves. You and your family, as an example, from your perspective, is more important than mine, as such, you will take from me what you need all costs to keep yours going. This is something people hate to hear or think of. 

So one thinks aag, it is just stories. Then you come across experts discussing a book, talking of what the author wrote about, the scenes s[he] set, that s[he] researched, and your stomach drops. WHAT!, It can happen?

And, it also brings out the best of humans. But because the more astute (read harder wired people) tend to survive, the more compassionate helpers like policy, Dr's,  nurses, are the first to be removed.  That thing about the strongest will survive, it is in our genes. It is but society and laws that is keeping us under control. You let that go.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

The core theme over all of them

That might be more of a reflection on you than society :-) Though one thing you say does ring true. In the movie "Passengers" (you should watch it!), the captain of the ship says to lady lead character (after she complains about the great evil that has been done to her): A drowning man will always drag someone down with him. It ain't right, but the man is drowning.

I also ended up reading another interesting trilogy over the holidays. Technically it's a teenage series (I'm not quite sure why, if you look at the content material it is anything but): Veronica Roth's Divergent series (there is a movie too, but as usual the book is better). You read that, and you realise the faction-based system they use is not that far-fetched... we're all kinda like that.

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4 minutes ago, plonkster said:

That might be more of a reflection on you than society :-)

Elaborate some more? All the genre books I tend to focus on have the same trends on how it may look when society breaks down, by many different authors.

Seen Passengers, saw the Divergent series on Amazon, have not gotten there yet. The free few chapters on Amazon did sound interesting. Tight control over the populace, till one starts asking why? :-) 

Today we are reversed. Little control over the populace, till the future Pressi asks why? ;)

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For the record. I don't think CoCT is going down in, end of the Cape and all that. 

I just make the case for what if it does go down, so that you are not uniformed, are tickled to look further, for at least you have read this thread.

So you know how limited our options are really. :D

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1 minute ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

All the genre books I tend to focus on

That's my point. You're the one picking the books.

My wife did say to me the other day that she wishes she didn't read Deon Meyer's "Koors" when she did... just before this water crisis.

There is a happy medium somewhere in all of this. It's better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war. Be the warrior. But don't start the war :-)

Just now, The Terrible Triplett said:

So you know how limited our options are really. :D

I think my biggest concern at the moment is that there will be many people with the same plan (a veritable exodus). Plans are all good and well, but not if everyone has the same plan.

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1 minute ago, plonkster said:

Plans are all good and well, but not if everyone has the same plan.

Jip, our options are limited. :-) 

2 minutes ago, plonkster said:

Deon Meyer's "Koors"

Spot on in my genre. Bought the book for my Dad, on his request. Must still get to it. Point is, the authors tend to do a lot of research, before they write. 

If I was into love stories, it will be different obviously. But that does not distract from the fact that people are hard wired to fight or flight - and we don't want large groups to be pushed into a corner ever. 

And by the way, that gardener, they can become the next general in the next war ... never underestimate people in a crisis, not their abilities, their strength of character ... nor their stupidness. :D

 

Feedback I got from our DA Councillor, on the post I made earlier:

 Hallo,

Ongelukkig is dit nie net die ontsouting wat gedoen moet word nie. Dit is ook net een gedeelte van die kostes.  Die groot kostes is om hierdie water skoon en drinkbaar te maak en dan is daar ook die pype wat gelê moet word om die water te vervoer.

Soos ek voorheen gesê het, daar was baie voorheen begroot om die pype te lê, dan kom daar ‘n ander “disaster” en geld word verskuif, want dit het toe nog gereën en die ontsoutingsprojek was nog nie in werking nie. Onthou, hierdie is nog steeds die verantwoordelikheid van Nasionale regering en vir jare kon Provinsie nie die fondse van hulle kry nie. Die Stad is slegs verantwoordelik om die water wat ontsout is, skoon te maak en pype te lê om dit na elke huishouding te vervoer.

(Response in part on David's post: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/declaring-state-emergency-re-water-crisis-other-david-lipschitz/)

Ek het lank met Ian hieroor gesels (this video https://www.facebook.com/GrahamTekSA/videos/1996858510573488/ ) (Hy sou die volgende dag met Grahme Tech ontmoet.) Die koste vir projekte baie kleiner as 125 megaliter is baie duur en baie groot projekte het ander kostes wat bykom wat biljoene behels. Omdat nasionale regering niks doen nie, moes die Stad inspring en self bulk water soek en dit plaas die Stad in groot skuld.

Die derde video (where the then newly appointed major stumbled): Die vraag was: Wat is die logistieke van DayZero?  Ian het die dag tevore die opdrag gekry om waterkrisis oor te neem. Sy grootste doel was om onmiddelik  daaraan te begin werk dat daar water is om DayZero te verhoed en nie om te beplan vir DayZero nie. Dit is die werk van die Disaster Risk dept. By navraag het hy gesê hy wou net eerlik wees. Daar was al tot dusver so baie gelieg oor die waterkrisis.

 

Groete
 

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8 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

 

He sits there listening. Then he says:
1) Can you verify these so-called facts being reported? (seeing he was a law professor)
2) Buy one tank now, no more than 2000l. If the rains return, it will be full and we can use that water in the house if the dams stay dry.
3) If the rains do not return, no matter how many tanks we have, they will stay empty, or not enough water. Or they become a white elephant in 4-6 months time.
4) For one cannot store enough water as an individual, if the rains stay away, in the city.
5) And the gem: If the rains return, dam levels rise again, there will be a lot of surplus tanks, at a bargain, then you buy, for water will be more expensive then.

I like your Dad's thinking

Just an observation. We have about 150 000l storage of rainwater on the farm and in my father's time was used for washing clothes, hot water, and drinking. It is the Karoo and we don't get a lot of rain so if you have enough storage you can go a long way. We have scaled back as one of the subterranean tanks has a crack in it. I am too big to fit through the manhole and my staff are too scared to climb down and see. Maybe I should hire one of the Sibanye miners to help. After being trapped for 24 hours my little predicament would be child's play.

In a more modern setup in Graaff-Reinet the owner put in several large underground tanks under the lawn in the garden and he and collects rainwater. He is virtually self sufficient and solar too so he really was planning ahead.

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10 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

be prepared to fight even Western governments if you promote your Christian beliefs

about three centuries ago, prior to the so called 'enlightment', there was a modicum of order in the western world. the famous calov bible of johan sebastian bach, the greatest composer of all time in my mind, was dated '5681 years after the creation of the earth' - that's it, schluss, basta, aus. the most prestigious of all universities, like harvard, was founded by a trained minister [all other universities in those days were also created by the church!]. in fact the church heralded the scientific 'explosion'. the original harvard seal, “Veritas Christo et Ecclesiae” which translated from latin means “Truth for Christ and the Church” was adopted in 1692 - true to the inherent cheek of man when left to his own devices, the seal has since been changed to just, 'veritas', [with retrospective effect!] now it is pc, at present "Harvard’s combined number of atheists and agnostics among its incoming class exceeds the number of Catholics and Protestants" - 'oh, but that's not an indicator of anything', you might say, until you listen to the atheist exponent par excellence, oxford professor richard dawkins stating "that if you do believe in God... it is probably because you are deluded, weak-minded, uneducated, and quite possibly perverse." [the god delusion]
so gentlemen, there you have it, the majority of us are looked upon as "deluded, weak-minded, uneducated, and quite possibly perverse" not only for believing in God, but actually also applying our minds to problems at hand.

God bless

g

 

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Only when elected officials trade their shameless entitlement to rule for the humility of duty can they expect compliance and cooperation from citizens.A breakdown in the trust relationship between the government and citizens means people will refuse to be governed. That is anarchy. Countrywide, it will make Cape Town's Day Zero literally look like a picnic.
and then, to all those asking 'what's in a name?', this piece of trivia " His [JZ] full name is Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma. The name Gedleyihlekisa means the one who laughs while grinding his enemies" :mellow:

we were forewarned, for we, the people are indeed his enemies!

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This today from Malema, I love it!!!

https://citizen.co.za/news/south-africa/1807617/find-water-solution-for-the-whole-of-sa-not-just-capes-whites/

 

And Zille sums it up quite nicely. She even uses my word - nefarious. :-)

Bottom line, Afr is beter, dinge gaan bars gaan, of dit kan totaal in duie stort, of dit reën … die foefieslide gaan interessant word:

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2018-02-05-from-the-inside-day-zero-memes-and-myths-abound-lets-get-back-to-essentials/#.WnnioKiWZaR

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3 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

AAaai. Myopia is a terrible thing. When there is no water, and agriculture and industry starts shedding jobs... then don't come crying to me.

He's not completely wrong. Informal settlements are using around 4% of the water or something like that. For them, it has been day zero for years already. In many ways, this crisis is about finding water for the middle- and upper class citizens. So he isn't completely wrong.  But you have to consider what happens if you don't do it.

I was having a conversation just earlier about how we treat things like a zero-sum game. We look at education for example, and instead of growing the number of opportunities, we look at how the slice taken up by speakers of a particular language is unfairly large and demand that the cake be sliced in a different way. Under the present circumstances I do understand that opportunities are limited. I do understand that it is unfair. But this shouldn't be a zero-sum game. Who is to blame for making it a zero-sum game... that is the question.

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1 hour ago, plonkster said:

He's not completely wrong.

I love it for he is going to realise soon, with the fiasco in Cpt, that he must start asking the question: Where's the maaney?

That one, he is a firebrand, he, in my opinion, with other parties backing him, is the one and only reason parliament got "concerned" today, and SONA got postponed. 

No-one wants to hear what Zupta has to say. 

So for his next fight, I hope, will be around the water issue in SA. The fact that it is one sided,  zero-sum game, I don't care - he's never going to change that - as long as he tears into the ANC. ;)

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Some progress on my well (seeing as I also posted pictures of that in this thread earlier), with the final result at the end. I now have enough water again to fill my 200 liter treatment tank without running it dry.

 

27539979_10155923356830619_8910044805534738480_n.jpg

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27504040_10155923765595619_9043758026083816889_o.jpg

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2 hours ago, plonkster said:

Some progress on my well

Great job. Out of interest why have you finished it off below surrounding ground level, or is that an optical illusion?

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5 hours ago, plonkster said:

Some progress on my well ... 

Lekker man!!! I am so happy for you Plonkster.

 

Myself, I think I have my storage issue sorted.

After the fiasco with the 220l drums, I got hold of a 1890l tank for about R2750 ... grinded me, as it was R1.46 per liter. But lets do ...

NO! Lets not do this!

So I sat, this water thing is going to blow over, water will be more expensive, we have to save more, my focus being on washing machine water that then goes to the toilets. Have the drums for the washing water, stench be-gone with HTH. So that is working perfectly. Not one drop of drinking water down the drain these past weeks, and the clothes are washed.

Then I thought. Tanks, if empty, just stands there, no further use. If full, still allegedly just stands there.

How do I get 2300l of water = +-23 washes = +-10-11 months of washing .

Then it hit me!!! A pool, a above ground pool!
Store water 2300l of water.
Can pack it away when empty.
Can swim in it if I want!
And the price - R0.65c per liter - because of the extra for the cover, otherwise with no cover R0.46 per liter at Makro.

Now that makes a lot more sense, not?

Can lasts between 3-7 years. 1 year warranty.

And if I want more storage, just buy another one, and another one, each one under a gutter.

This is what I got, arriving Friday, before the weekends rain.

 

Pool.jpg

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2 hours ago, pilotfish said:

have you finished it off below surrounding ground level, or is that an optical illusion?

The last ring stops slightly below ground level, but then there's brickwork on top of that so that the final result sits a little higher than ground level. Lower would have been a problem when it does rain again :-)

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3 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

 

Then it hit me!!! A pool, a above ground pool!
Store water 2300l of water.
Can pack it away when empty.
Can swim in it if I want!
And the price - R0.65c per liter - because of the extra for the cover, otherwise with no cover R0.46 per liter at Makro.

A man on a mission - mooi!

My pool water got used last winter - all 50000 litres during the drought!  HTH is your friend ;)

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9 hours ago, Mark said:

... all 50000 litres during the drought! 

That proves my own point to me.

I cannot store enough water for a family of 6 on a property in the city, unless I spend 10's of thousand, using max 5000l pm ... or spend more to be able to use more.

That is not anywhere comfortable. Requires a huge change in lifestyle, or spend even more monies to alter what is to make it "easier" to keep on 5000 pm.

In cities we have to do it collectively to make it affordable.

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This was shared with me on social media. Again, a brilliant plan if you have the space, and if you put all the washing machine water through there along with all the bath water. Only trouble for me is our volumes are now ridiculously low, but if I already had some plastic drums I might have done this.

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39 minutes ago, plonkster said:

This was shared with me on social media. Again, a brilliant plan if you have the space, and if you put all the washing machine water through there along with all the bath water. Only trouble for me is our volumes are now ridiculously low, but if I already had some plastic drums I might have done this.

don't you have a similar design? 

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54 minutes ago, SilverNodashi said:

don't you have a similar design? 

Mine is very different. I should make a video about it some time.

I have only one treatment tank. The water goes into this tank directly from the well. It is then treated with Ozone for about half an hour, and left to stand a few hours. Then I put in a floculant, and leave it until the next day.

To see it working you really should take a flashlight and look in the tank at night. You can see suspended dirt floating in the water.

The next day the water is usually clear and the bad stuff is at the bottom of the tank. I then pump the top two-thirds of the tank (I don't draw from the bottom of the tank, that's where the junk settles) through a pleated filter and then through a carbon filter, and that goes into another bigger tank. And that is the end of the road.

The treatment tank is immediately refilled with well water and the next cycle starts.

Occasionally I add a bit of chlorine to keep the lines clean. And that's it. Nothing terribly scientific about it.

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