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The Terrible Triplett

Water harvesting and use, same logic as solar systems.

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for all of us drought stricken fellas, here is a snap of the wettest place in south africa, matiwa [limpopo] with an avg rainfall of 2004mm pa over the last 60 years

image.png.5f205c90e57edeede1c344dbf4ab0b82.png

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1 hour ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Moving is going to be a vicious one if it is done en-mass by the more affluent.

That's the problem. How long do you wait? I think if the worst case scenario plays out, the Armagedon type situation, and you decide that it is untenable and want to flee in a matter of days (not weeks), then I'm going to Namibia. Simple reason: There's going to be many people with the same idea of moving to a nearby town with cheap accommodation and water, so it's going to make sense to put some barriers between yourself and the problem. An international border sounds like a good idea. And I have citizenship.

Edit: I think it depends on whether transport will be by road or by air. If the roads remain relatively safe, and I expect they will for the most part, at least once you hit Malmesbury, then Namibia is the best option. If the airport remain functional, Europe is an option, and better for work purposes, but requires way more planning, so no good for a matter-of-days exit plan.

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here is my proposal how to avoid water day zero and NEVER ever get into this situation again:
 
short term:
 
1. force government to declare state of emergency (to avoid any legal problems). Have to be creative how to do this. Western cape has a lot of leverage! Big portion of South African GDP!
 
2. Identify and publish all big users of water (pipes/sluices/boreholes) removing water from major western cape water storage locations).
 
3. Appoint and publish names of managers for each big  “pipe/sluice/borehole” removing water from major western cape water storage locations.
 
3. Define and communicate maximum daily quota of water allowed to be removed by each big pipe/sluice/borehole from major western cape water storage locations (this has to be done in an autocratic way. We have no time for lengthy democratic debates. Hence the need for a state of emergency.
 
4. Monitor, manage and publish consumption for each big pipe/sluice/borehole on a 24 hour cycle and switch off supply after quota has been reached (put facilitates in place to enforce law enforcement to avoid unrest and distribute emergency supply of water)
 
5. Have daily action center meeting with the managers of every big pipe/sluice/borehole drawing water from all major western cape water storage location and review balanced scorecard and corrective action plans and publish result of meeting.
 
6. Request each manager of “his/her big pipe/sluice/borehole” to define, monitor and manage his/her target (with balanced scorecard and corrective action plans publicly published).
 
The manager of the “Cape Town city user pipe” could for example manage consumption in the following way:
 
- set weekly targets for every household/business based on the quota allocated to him/her
- request each household/business to report weekly water consumption and if target has not been met why not
- establish a task force to monitor and follow up on households/businesses not reporting or not meeting targets
- publish consumption of all users “in his pipe” and corrective action taken by the taskforce how to bring noncompliant users in line with the target
 
7. Identify and publish (with Names of the responsible manager) all existing and possible short term augmentation projects. Review status and corrective action plans in daily action center and publish results. 
 
 
medium and long term:
 
8. Compile implement and regularly review  and publish a long term strategy how to provide a sustained water supply to the population of the western cape (strategy and reviews to be endorsed and approved by independent bodies like engineers or universities)
 
8. lobby to change the law to make water resource management in the western cape the responsibility of the province instead of the government.

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39 minutes ago, Fuenkli said:

here is my proposal how to avoid water day zero and NEVER ever get into this situation again:

Done in a Autocratic way ... yes yes yes!

 

My solution:

  1. Install grey water treatment plants like Windhoek, get the funds right now for Blubbermint.
  2. Get desalination plant/s online, that can switch on / off as needed, to supplement the system when needed. Again, get the funds right now for Blubbermint.
  3. Here I am going out on a limb. :D ... Ban all borehole usage bar farmers / select manufacturing (with treatment plants required by law), for the sole use of CoCT in case of emergency. Borehole water is a last resort backup plan (case of emergency, break the glass case), like in "Regional Security" and all that for food / drinking water for ALL, not just for the boreholes user own private use. Boreholes should be outlawed in Cities.
  4. Like the Aussies, bylaws to stipulate the requirement of x liters of rainwater stored per property, part of new building regulations.
  5. All pool and gardens can only be watered from said tanks rainwater tanks.

In other words, potable water becomes seriously expensive. We are forced to use it very wisely, and if you can afford a lot of it, name and shame the culprits, for I don't care if you have money, water is not something that can be abused, like air.

The above suggestions, are autocratic, not open for negotiation of comment.

So Say We All.

Ps. The problem we now face was in a article published in Nat Geo, given to me to read, after we moved to Cpt, about +-15 years ago. 

 

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1 hour ago, plonkster said:

That's the problem. How long do you wait?

Two options:
1) Move before it starts. 
2) Depending on where you live, go to ground, hunker down, till the the worst is over and there is a lull and then move y're arse getting out of town.

Obviously it does require a serious amount of smart and forward planning, relying that the community in which you reside, bands together.

I opt for option 2, for the moment you leave the house and it does indeed go south, there probably will be nothing to return to, or new occupants you did not invite.

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@plonkster ... listen to what Ziile said Yesterday ...

3 things that caught my attention:
- 2 years of rain to fill the dams - as I asked above,  who says it is going to be a bumper raining season/s?
- Desalination plants coming online in Arpil, 16mil liters per day. We use 600mil liters per day. There goes THAT idea till the can fund a HUGE desalination plant, with Dept of Waterworks having squandered all their funds.
- Nat Government, as with Eskom, did not do their JOB - again. Surprise!!!

continues here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAS4MEEs1JI

Just love how they cut off when someone speaks out against Blubbermint.

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1 hour ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

- Nat Government, as with Eskom, did not do their JOB - again. Surprise!!!

It's interesting that what OUTA has been arguing -- that National government should pay and not the consumers -- is exactly what Helen says. I don't know about other people... but I was willing to pay that levy. If it would have helped us secure our own water sources, I would gladly have pitched in. Again, I don't know how other people felt, but if you had come to me, and told me how we're still paying for the Bergrivier dam (how many people know that?), and why this levy is necessary because AGAIN national government is failing us and we (as the privileged funders of this great province) will have to pull the wagon through the ditch (that just doesn't work in English does it?), and if Afriforum and everyone who is still belatedly sending SMSes around trying to fight this levy which isn't going to happen anyway now had rather put their weight behind a way to find the money rather than to not find it...

You know... for the most part I think Afriforum does good things. I understand that they are not well liked among people of a different demographic, but for the most part, they get a lot of stuff. But in this case, between them and OUTA... all we did was refuse to help ourselves while calling on the guys that we know won't help to do it.

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So you need to look at this from the other side and start regarding "day zero" as an wonderful opportunity!

  • First off you buy a 50,000L tanker and a bunch of 5000L tanks + pressure pumps,
  • you sell the 5000L water tank + pressure pump (full) to your neighbors,
  • The tank is installed with a reverse feed into the nearest garden tap,
  • this is done at a healthy profit - it is business not charity,
  • When "day zero" arrives the client simply shuts off municipal feed and enables tank feed,
  • The client household carries on as normal, and gives you 48hr notice of refill required (about every 10 days for a normal household),
  • You pitch up with your tanker (after verifying payment received) and refill the tank - at another healthy profit,
  • Then you can come back here and bitch like hell when the water gets switched back on:D

Damn, I wish I lived in Cape Town.

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1 minute ago, pilotfish said:

at another healthy profit

The law prohibits the selling of water. You cannot sell what you don't own, and nobody owns the water, or rather, constitutionally everyone owns the water or has rights to it. Now of course you can charge for the service and not for the material -- there are some people trying that loop hole with borehole water right now -- but again, there's all sorts of legalities around where you get your water from.

I see there are now people who can sell you purified non-potable water. In fact, I can think of ways to make it work, for example, if you had a contact at a sewage plant, or you had your own purification plant, or perhaps you can get access to some of the water that we presently dump into the ocean and clean that. Opportunities for sure... but will it be economical?

TTT will tell you driving a 50kl tanker is no joke ;-)

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3 minutes ago, plonkster said:

The law prohibits the selling of water

There would be no sale of water - the 1st sale would be supply and install tank and pressure pump, the ongoing sales would be a "delivery charge", no-one could expect a 50,000L tanker to swing past the house for free!

5 minutes ago, plonkster said:

but will it be economical?

Hell No! It will cost a fortune and only the top tier could afford it, but isn't that always the case in these types of situations!

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4 minutes ago, pilotfish said:

delivery charge

Absolutely. Your main problem will be the legal acquisition of the water that you fill the tanker with. My thinking is on the lines of using dirty water that you obtain from someone who don't want it, cleaning it, and delivering to your customers. In other words, you're not stealing anybody's water. You're delivering a genuine service.

Perhaps partner up with @Mike and his desalination plant :-)

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8 minutes ago, plonkster said:

Your main problem will be the legal acquisition of the water that you fill the tanker with

I guess I would find a farmer (outside of the affected area) with a very productive borehole, and cut him in on a piece of the action so long as he donates the water required:)

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1 hour ago, plonkster said:

... all we did was refuse to help ourselves while calling on the guys that we know won't help to do it.

+1 on that. Also said we must pay the levy and sort it out, no matter how unfair it is.

 

1 hour ago, plonkster said:

TTT will tell you driving a 50kl tanker is no joke ;-)

Jip. It is quite a tricky load to cart, it moves around you see. So pulling away, corners and the worst, emergency stops, your need to be wide awake at all times.

Pitched the EXACT same idea to a few buds just 2 nights ago on Whatsapp.

Sums we came up with:
Lets say rental per day of food grade tanker and truck with diesel: R20 000k
Cost therefor is:
20 000 / 50 000 liters = R0.40c per liter of water. 2km per liter for the double diff truck with 3 axle tanker, or interlink trailers i.e. 2 x trailers.
Driver R 2 000 + life insurance per delivery, for you want someone to move the "goods", not steal it, who wants to make money as well, with danger pay.
R22 000 for 1 delivery per day.
Delivery fee of R0.75 per liter of water = R37 500
= R15 500 profit for 1 delivery per day - depending how far the water source is. If it is close, less diesel, more loads per day, can drop the per liter delivery fee.

If there is a lot of potential, then buy a 2nd hand truck and tanker, with tanker set to food grade spec, plus license and and permits and all that.

The only issues: Where to get the water, how to make sure it is potable, keep the tanker in perfect state. 

But, CoCT is catching on with the above scheme, for it is not quite right according to some of the municipal bylaws, as water is for free as Plonk said.

If the problem continues, as I suspect we are going for broke if there are no rains after April, hijacking of said vehicle would be a interesting problem to solve.

 

1 hour ago, pilotfish said:

Damn, I wish I lived in Cape Town.

Source the truck, I'll drive it.

 

1 hour ago, pilotfish said:

... and cut him in on a piece of the action ...

Overnight fees? :-) 

2 hours ago, pilotfish said:

... you sell the 5000L water tank + pressure pump (full) to your neighbors,

Rent them out per month, with option to buy.

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32 minutes ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Rent them out per month, with option to buy.

Nope the client must buy outright, otherwise 2 months later it pi$$es with rain and you suddenly own 50 x 5000L tanks+pumps and have to find some place to store them!

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52 minutes ago, pilotfish said:

Nope the client must buy outright, otherwise 2 months later it pi$$es with rain and you suddenly own 50 x 5000L tanks+pumps and have to find some place to store them!

Ok, good point. Must be sold.

 

Zille said we need 2 years to fill the dams.

I say with 3 consecutive years of lower rainfall... huge bets are being placed on mother nature to reverse the trend. 

Lets hear what Mmusi Maimane has to say tomorrow at 11h00 am, when he briefs SA on the plan of action to avoid "Day Zero" in CoCT. Live stream on FB apparently also.

 

I have reduced the problem to one bottom line:
If the rains do not return in the next few months, deep drenching continuous rain in the catchment areas, or, in lieu of such, a desalination plant that can delivery +-400-500mil liters of water per day ... it is going to get REALLY interesting.

The ripple effect of no rain, just in the Western Cape, is ginormous.

One example I came across was that millions of family members, whom rely on 600 000 tourism and farm workers, will be left with not only water, but no money to buy food, because of the resultant job losses directly linked to no water for continued farming activities.

How a desalination plant in Cpt will help farmers, I have no idea.

That, I think, is the sum total of it. No proper rain, huge disaster. No rain, but a massive desalination plant, the farmers and their workers, export, food for the city, still lose.

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1 hour ago, plonkster said:

On a more positive note again ...

All that is true, I support that. Focus and be sane.

Like I said before, if the rains come, no problem, we won the lottery with Mother Nature, we have a little bit more time.

BUT.

I have just one question for Zille and Lille. What if the rains do not come as expected?

Want to hear it from an official, no fake news, no interpretations, no political correctness. The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

With friends last night. We chatted about the elephant in the room. Two things stood out for me:
- They must do something.
- My grey-water system is watering my garden now. I use some of that water for the toilets.
- We have a borehole, we can supply the house and water the garden (no you cannot!), but the water is getting more and more cloudy.
- We have 5000l tank to fill the pool and water the garden.
- We share a bath once a day now.
- We are buying bottled water and storing that.
- Moving on. Did you see the latest FB posts on Little Harry ... 

(facepalm)

Tell us what happens Jun 2018 if the rains do not return, is late or insufficient.
Let us plan for that. Make a bylaw to start getting government funded tanks or such in case 

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It would appear from today's news reports that the blame lies with DWA, (Dept of Water Affairs and Sanitation), which is apparently responsible for supplying bulk water to municipalities for distribution in terms of the Constitution. Well either they are brain dead or simply not concerned or just are incapable of planning. The shortage of rainfall during the past winter and resultant insufficient dam levels in the Western Cape was clear to see for anyone with a functioning brain. The time for planning is long past. All that remains is action to avert a disaster. Trucks delivering a few liters of water to families and individuals will not keep the sewerage systems functioning with a health catastrophe of biblical proportions in sight. Hopefully my 10K liters of collected rain water will see me and my wife through until the Voelvlei dam can supply us again. That is if it even rains. Otherwise we may have to go for an extended visit to our daughter in Dubai were in excess of 2 billion liters are produced every day.  DWA should go and learn there. Alternatively invest in one of @Mike''s desalinators.

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a lot of chickens running around without heads.... your local members of whatever political party  just want points.   if we the people have to sit around and wait .....then you have already lost the battle. the water issue started before the Eskom debacle, i was told by a client 7 years ago to be prepared for this event......sad thing is he worked for Dept Water & sanitation....

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