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The Terrible Triplett

Current Water Affairs.

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And here it begins ... 50l pppd as from 1 Feb.

Why, because, and I quote: "... more than 60% of Cape Town residents are not saving water."

See here: Level 6B Water Restrictions

Man, THIS is throwing a spanner in MY works!

What I cannot fathom, probably it is political correctness, is why they simply, after all these months, don't just cut the over-users water ... really.

When I am President ...

Who in their right mind can today claim they did not know they are using more than their share of the water? Try to explain that to me after all these months of newspaper articles, boards and other warnings, emails, friends chatting, CoCT sending you correspondence, even visiting you?

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Been told by a person, who lives in Delft, that the streets are full of water. Allegedly a lot of car washes sprang up overnight at peoples homes.

So I thought, what if it is a conspiracy. What if the 60% of the users are not part of the little green dots, dots where there are measurements taken?

What if some political party/ies is behind it all, to drain the last water to bring the province on its knees?

Whoops ... coffee is cold again. 

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3 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

What I cannot fathom, probably it is political correctness, is why they simply, after all these months, don't just cut the over-users water ... really.

There, look at the fines ... If you use more than 50l of water a day in Cape Town, you will be punished financially

Households that use up to 6‚000l of water a month‚ currently paying R28.44‚ will see their bill rise to R145.98.
For those who use up to 10‚500l‚ the bill will rise from R109.50 to R390.82.
Then it gets ugly.
Households that use up to 20‚000l will see their bill rise from R361.06 to R1‚536.25;
up to 35‚000l‚ bills will rise from R1‚050.04 to R6‚939.57;
and up to 50‚000l‚ bills will rise from R2‚888.81 to R20‚619.57.

Let's see if De Lille can do it ... gave that gal a Bells.

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7 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

For those who use up to 10‚500l‚ the bill will rise from R109.50 to R390.82.

I can live with that. In fact, I might have to. We're now at the "cutting the wife's morning shower" point, because we now need to go down from 70l pppd to 50. And there isn't much to be gained from the guy renting the flat next door... he's already doing  low 30s.

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7 hours ago, plonkster said:

Put mp3 playing app on device that plays Patricia's voice: Hey! Djy moet uitklim!

This is cheaper: https://2minuteshowersongs.com/

:D

Ps. I am not a cheap skate but dang, but where does it stop!?

EDIT: Older generation made plan, saved money ... they got quite settled in their retirement.

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1 hour ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

EDIT: Older generation made plan, saved money ... they got quite settled in their retirement.

You know, you're not the only one worried about that. Bit of an off-topic diversion, but it seems applicable. Since the big slowdown of 2008, which only hit me around 2010 when I got retrenched, I spent almost a decade just keeping things afloat, although I did invest very heavily into myself knowledge-wise. This is now finally beginning to pay off... which is good... but other than a slightly larger property investment than most people my age, there is preciously little to brag about. So perhaps you are right, make a plan, save money... retire :)

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13 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Homeless people should be rewarded with R1 000

now that will create a royal legal nightmare, "wie beweer moet bewys!" - beyond reasonable doubt?

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1 hour ago, gabriel said:

now that will create a royal legal nightmare, "wie beweer moet bewys!" - beyond reasonable doubt?

Easy to sort that. Like if the garden was watered, test the ground for water content. 

Where does the R1000 come from? If the person was found guilty, via the R20 000 I would impose if I was Pressi.

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Nou so groot geskrik!

Metro police het my vasgedruk in 'n roadblock.

Sê die blerrie konstabeltjie vir my: "Meneer, blaas gou in die pypie, ons wil kyk hoeveel glase water jy gedrink het."

Dankie tog ek het daai Black Label dumpie gedrink in plaas van daai 3de glas water na my morning run. Anders was ek nou oor die limit vir Level 6B water restrictions.

Sjoe, dit was amper

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Mmmm, they also see the problem brewing: 

http://ewn.co.za/2018/01/22/plans-in-place-to-deal-with-disease-outbreaks-amid-ct-water-crisis

More and more I come across little comments re. violence and riots and so forth when the water is gone.

Bleh I thought. But what if there is a potential problem waiting to happen?

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29 minutes ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

If Gabriel is ready for this move ...

well, i've got 40k capacity and am already one of the few residences with electric fencing around here [ex-joburg paranoia?] - so i am a target of sorts, what they called in the old days 'sagte teiken' .... but i'm ready, as they say, 'bring it on' , or was that 'c'mon, make my day' :-)

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1 hour ago, gabriel said:

ANARCHY???

I figure that if things go really bad, the schools will likely close for 2 months or so. The schools are the only thing keeping us here. Neither me or my wife have jobs that require us to be physically in this location. Hence, if it comes to that, we have a number of options.

The first option, for me, is a nearby coastal town that has good internet and still has water, but "nearby" means somewhere on the other side of 400km away. This is preferable, as you are only a few hours away from home base, should you need to do anything here. Financial shock will be bad enough, because you'd have to short-term rent an extra house for 2 months.

The second option is to head up to Pretoria, perhaps even arrange temporary schooling options. We have some family there, you're close to an airport, and my wife's company has offices there. I'd have to slug up my whole lot of development equipment, but other than that, I can do all my work from there. Renting a home will likely by quite a bit more expensive.

Third option is Windhoek, Namibia. Have family up there. House rental is better than down here, but still not cheap. They sorted their water problem two decades ago, even if they don't have much.

Fourth option is Europe. I was planning a family holiday anyway. Funds spent on relocating within SA might as well be spent a little earlier. Rent in Europe comes to around 800-1000 Euro a month, pretty similar to Western Cape levels actually, though our houses are a bit bigger. Have some contacts there that could help us if need be. Likely by far the most expensive option and I would likely JUST scrape by if we did that. Requires the most planning too, Visas are expensive (thanks VFS global!), as are passports (not sure when that happened but suddenly it's like R700 for a passport).

So... hot tin roof stuff at the moment. I really don't want to be here if this goes bad. My opinion. Sorry if it is a little negative. I'm vacillating so much between positive and negative these days that I'm getting seasick.

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54 minutes ago, plonkster said:

It's all we've got. If the rains don't return, then we're stuck with the +- 150 million liters a day that we can desalinate and pump from aquifers. It's a gamble alright.

From where I sit, letting people believe the end is just around the corner, not telling them "rain permitting", it is very VERY dangerous gamble to take as a political party.

More and more the word anarchy coupled with police and military presence is being used by officials in the news. I mean if the likes of Gugulethu, Khayelitsha, Delft run dry, where can that lead to? Not being anything related to a racist, just like to BELIEVE my neighbors will not go there ... yet.

Moving is going to be a vicious one if it is done en-mass by the more affluent.
You will have the early adopters, which will leave a lot with aaargh, the can't take it. Shame.
Then as it gets worse, panic sets in, the bulk starts moving, with no resources left to move them, or place that can accept them.

In and during that mad scramble, CoCT will go down so hard, words like epidermic proportions, Armageddon, comes to mind, when the masses left behind realize they are stuck with nowhere to go. Rampage comes to mind looking for water ... 

Ok, I like to read books when the SHTF story lines. Water, that is a new one ... wait, never read a novel about a city running out of water ... 

From what I understand. ALL that is needed is this:
1) ANC recognizes the problem, declares an Emergency, CoCT can now act faster.
2) Once that is done, ANC / CoCT needs to find the funds for said desalination plants, greywater treatment etc etc etc - boreholes are NOT a long term solution.
3) Now install said plants with haste, the solutions are there, right now, today.
Problem sorted, and water is then more expensive.

 

EDIT: They are basting the return of the rains on 2017 season pattern it seems to me ... but it has declined in the previous 3 years to 2017?

 

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I am starting to think that people are seeing this problem with their minds, but are not "feeling" it with their hearts.

In other words, it is easy to talk about it, plan for it, whilst there is still water in the taps.

But when that water runs dry, nothing week after week and your carefully laden plans of water storage is also empty, and the violence starts, overruns the police and military ...we, the masses (all of us included), have NO idea of what can come of this if the rains do not return.

We are living in a bubble.

 

Damn, I sound like a Doomsday Prepper!!! Scaremonger. 

But hey, I'm not! Remember I've got the smallest oldest solar installation.
Only yesterday I got a few drums - and then the rains, as predicted, never fell. :P

Having storage, and no rain, it is a sick feeling ... resulted in these dark thoughts this morning.

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1 hour ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Moving is going to be a vicious one if it is done en-mass by the more affluent.

That's the problem. How long do you wait? I think if the worst case scenario plays out, the Armagedon type situation, and you decide that it is untenable and want to flee in a matter of days (not weeks), then I'm going to Namibia. Simple reason: There's going to be many people with the same idea of moving to a nearby town with cheap accommodation and water, so it's going to make sense to put some barriers between yourself and the problem. An international border sounds like a good idea. And I have citizenship.

Edit: I think it depends on whether transport will be by road or by air. If the roads remain relatively safe, and I expect they will for the most part, at least once you hit Malmesbury, then Namibia is the best option. If the airport remain functional, Europe is an option, and better for work purposes, but requires way more planning, so no good for a matter-of-days exit plan.

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here is my proposal how to avoid water day zero and NEVER ever get into this situation again:
 
short term:
 
1. force government to declare state of emergency (to avoid any legal problems). Have to be creative how to do this. Western cape has a lot of leverage! Big portion of South African GDP!
 
2. Identify and publish all big users of water (pipes/sluices/boreholes) removing water from major western cape water storage locations).
 
3. Appoint and publish names of managers for each big  “pipe/sluice/borehole” removing water from major western cape water storage locations.
 
3. Define and communicate maximum daily quota of water allowed to be removed by each big pipe/sluice/borehole from major western cape water storage locations (this has to be done in an autocratic way. We have no time for lengthy democratic debates. Hence the need for a state of emergency.
 
4. Monitor, manage and publish consumption for each big pipe/sluice/borehole on a 24 hour cycle and switch off supply after quota has been reached (put facilitates in place to enforce law enforcement to avoid unrest and distribute emergency supply of water)
 
5. Have daily action center meeting with the managers of every big pipe/sluice/borehole drawing water from all major western cape water storage location and review balanced scorecard and corrective action plans and publish result of meeting.
 
6. Request each manager of “his/her big pipe/sluice/borehole” to define, monitor and manage his/her target (with balanced scorecard and corrective action plans publicly published).
 
The manager of the “Cape Town city user pipe” could for example manage consumption in the following way:
 
- set weekly targets for every household/business based on the quota allocated to him/her
- request each household/business to report weekly water consumption and if target has not been met why not
- establish a task force to monitor and follow up on households/businesses not reporting or not meeting targets
- publish consumption of all users “in his pipe” and corrective action taken by the taskforce how to bring noncompliant users in line with the target
 
7. Identify and publish (with Names of the responsible manager) all existing and possible short term augmentation projects. Review status and corrective action plans in daily action center and publish results. 
 
 
medium and long term:
 
8. Compile implement and regularly review  and publish a long term strategy how to provide a sustained water supply to the population of the western cape (strategy and reviews to be endorsed and approved by independent bodies like engineers or universities)
 
8. lobby to change the law to make water resource management in the western cape the responsibility of the province instead of the government.

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39 minutes ago, Fuenkli said:

here is my proposal how to avoid water day zero and NEVER ever get into this situation again:

Done in a Autocratic way ... yes yes yes!

 

My solution:

  1. Install grey water treatment plants like Windhoek, get the funds right now for Blubbermint.
  2. Get desalination plant/s online, that can switch on / off as needed, to supplement the system when needed. Again, get the funds right now for Blubbermint.
  3. Here I am going out on a limb. :D ... Ban all borehole usage bar farmers / select manufacturing (with treatment plants required by law), for the sole use of CoCT in case of emergency. Borehole water is a last resort backup plan (case of emergency, break the glass case), like in "Regional Security" and all that for food / drinking water for ALL, not just for the boreholes user own private use. Boreholes should be outlawed in Cities.
  4. Like the Aussies, bylaws to stipulate the requirement of x liters of rainwater stored per property, part of new building regulations.
  5. All pool and gardens can only be watered from said tanks rainwater tanks.

In other words, potable water becomes seriously expensive. We are forced to use it very wisely, and if you can afford a lot of it, name and shame the culprits, for I don't care if you have money, water is not something that can be abused, like air.

The above suggestions, are autocratic, not open for negotiation of comment.

So Say We All.

Ps. The problem we now face was in a article published in Nat Geo, given to me to read, after we moved to Cpt, about +-15 years ago. 

 

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1 hour ago, plonkster said:

That's the problem. How long do you wait?

Two options:
1) Move before it starts. 
2) Depending on where you live, go to ground, hunker down, till the the worst is over and there is a lull and then move y're arse getting out of town.

Obviously it does require a serious amount of smart and forward planning, relying that the community in which you reside, bands together.

I opt for option 2, for the moment you leave the house and it does indeed go south, there probably will be nothing to return to, or new occupants you did not invite.

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