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The Terrible Triplett

Current Water Affairs.

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7 hours ago, Fuenkli said:

did any of you ever see a medium and long term plan for the water supply situation in the greater Cape Town area?

Water supply is the job of DWS, national government. Technically any plans from Cape Town's side would be illegal. Even the present measures they are implementing are somewhat borderline and can only be done because a proper emergency was declared and funds could be moved.

That's not an answer, I know. But I suspect that is the answer.

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7 hours ago, Fuenkli said:

medium and long term plan

reminds me of the '5 year' plans in most communist countries - but same as here, if you hear that from a politician it is propaganda, aimed at pacifying dissapointed voters and winning new ignorami; same old game... pardon my realistic pessimism when it comes to those entrusted with our money etc

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you basically confirm, that like electricity we have no option than to introduce our own back up system if we want to have enough water all the time. It is sad what has become of our country :(. I think time for plan B is here. 

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49 minutes ago, Fuenkli said:

I think time for plan B is here.

the problem with plan b is the fact that all have their own agenda, most probably making my plan b rather unpopular for instance.

the problem obviously started with plan a. plan a was a non-event as it was not a plan in the 1st place; in other words if we speak of plan b we actually speak of plan a.

eish folks... this thing gets confusing :huh:

reminds me of a saying "something is void for vagueness or vague for voidness" of so iets...

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I think it depends on what you mean by "plan B". Plan A, as Gab says, is of course never actually labelled as such. Plan A is when things carry on as usual, when I am comfortable, nothing is rocking the boat. Plan B is the alternate thing we do when things are not going as planned, it's to salvage things that are important to you that's now at risk.

That begs the question: What are these things? Some things are unquestionable of course: The life of my family and myself are things I would prefer to keep intact. My means of making a living as well. The roof over my head. Being able to go outside without having to duck for bullets. Having enough food to eat. That sort of thing. But for middle- to upperclass people it hardly ends there. I want to educate my kids. I want to invest and save money so that one day I might retire (in other words, I am not content with just making ends meet). I want my wife to be happy and not as depressed as she is about the dying garden. And so we can keep moving the line. If you are particularly rich, you might say I'm moving to plan B (a different location) because I'd like to take a decent shower... no human being can live like this... what with all this carrying of buckets!

So each person must decide for himself when a new plan is necessary.

The trouble with water and electricity, in most of our business lines, is that we pretty much cannot make a living without it. Without electricity, telecoms die, and without proper telecoms, I cannot do my work, and without being able to do my work, I cannot generate an income, and at this point we are WELL beyond the point where I am comfortable with hanging around and waiting it out.

The only possible solution to my conundrum is a relocation-solution. So plan B has to start with making sure the paperwork is in order. So that is what I am doing.

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Water and electricity is not going to get cheaper, ever, nor would it be as secure nor more reliable, than what it was in the past. 

We are competing with the "Have not's".

However, I have reduced our electricity use and dependency on it, and will go next level when pushed.

Same now with water. Have reduced our consumption, will go next level, if I am forced.

Proper telecoms? Have looked briefly at satellite internet - in case of Cell, fiber and ADSL not being reliable anymore. It is not cheap, so reduce 1st, as per my normal operating procedure. But only if I'm pushed.

A plan I am struggling with, if I am one of the "haves", how to make sure I stay a "have", not getting robbed to "Have not's" status. 

Issue is, the more you have, the more worries you inherit.

Relocation is obviously an option, for individuals, but en-masse, that creates a new set of problems.

Never a dull moment I see. 

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The first thing to suffer in a war is the plan. 

After the first bullet it gets down to everybody for themselves. 

Thats reality....

So if you want your plans to work the right time is now. 

DO NOT wait for the conflict to start. In a war there are only refugees...

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10 minutes ago, Johandup said:

DO NOT wait for the conflict to start. In a war there are only refugees...

Could not be truer. 

The thing is, the majority of us live in our bubbles. Until it pops, which is by then too late, we have no plan.

Taking my struggle to the next level: When do you move on your plans, for doing it at your home in the city ... ain't gonna work so well IF the SHTF in our lifetimes.

Need a crystal ball.

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3 hours ago, plonkster said:

So plan B has to start with making sure the paperwork is in order. So that is what I am doing.

I agree with that. I think it would also be prudent to start reducing the non movable assets like land and property we have. Should it collapse like in Zimbabwe we are at least not going to loose all the money.  

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59 minutes ago, Fuenkli said:

start reducing the non movable assets

for some even getting rid of some moveable assets might be prudent; but then we are not part of the solution but in some way part of the problem [brain drain?] - i believe most sa citizens on this forum are not going to partake in the exodus. i know i described myself as a realistic pessimist regarding especially our economic infrastructure, but then, things have been worse [ask paul & silas]. and even in the worst of situations there is a way out, so maybe we should focus on that - i know it is by far the more difficult choice, but in the end the most rewarding.

 

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2 hours ago, Fuenkli said:

I think it would also be prudent to start reducing the non movable assets like land and property we have

I'm not sure if we're there yet. As an analogy (analogies are often poor, but here we go): I've lost a lot of money while trying to learn how to trade currencies, and very often it was when I got nervous and closed a position deep in the red. Salvage what you can before you lose everything, right? And then it bounces right back two days later and you look like a fool.

Presently we are deep in the red. But you don't judge an investment based on historical performance, you judge it on future potential. So the question is whether there is the potential to bounce back. I think that presently there is a lot of potential. We're rid of JZ. We have a very moderate president in charge or the ruling party.

Unfortunately there's also the possibility of collapse. Let's not stick our heads in the sand.

Collapse is however not an event, it is a process... BUT... there is often a point of no return that gets passed, a Kristallnacht, a crossing of the Rubicon, a day when the war veterans arrive on a farm and the government looks the other way. When that day comes, it will be too late to attempt to sell anything.

If the news is to be believed though, the collapse is imminent. Frankly there is no time to sell anything if these prophets of doom are to be believed (maybe we should believe them, I don't know). If that sort of thing happens, I really have no issue with being declared insolvent. I still have time to bounce back, although that is rapidly running out. I can't wait another decade.

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I am a big believer in history and statistics.

When I look at Africa I see no country that is better off than SA. Thats history.

But I also look at what progress all the african countries have made since they have all gained their independance from their european masters. And sadly my observation is that they all had gone downhill at a terrible pace. Thats statistics.

So why will it not happen here? There are excellent indicators that the same processes is already taking place inside our country as well. Everybody in authority believes that tomorrow will look after itself and we have nothing to fear.

Our local voters will only wake up the day when they cannot afford food, fuel is too expensive and the power only happens once a week for a short while. And of course medicine will be too expensive to afford. And their grants will buy them nothing.

And then it will be too late. Europe is really too far to cross to by boat.

And the Chinese will take ownership of our economy and souls.

Cape Town will be the first example of society going wild once there is not enough water. Thirst is a terrible thing and our people still think it is their right to have it all the time. And when I look at what they do when services stop I can but fear what will happen once the water runs out. I pray that it will rain so the dams can get full.

Malawi and the surrounding countries suffered from power outages some 3 years ago when there was a drought and the flow in the Zambesi river was inadequate to power all the hydro power stations. This did not deter their authorities to drop the river to dangerously low levels in order to generate power (way above what their contracts allowed btw). Electricity was more important than water to drink.

I cannot think that any European country will follow such crooked logic.

But this is Africa for you!

UBUNTU....

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29 minutes ago, Johandup said:

But I also look at what progress all the african countries have made since they have all gained their independance from their european masters. And sadly my observation is that they all had gone downhill at a terrible pace. Thats statistics.

I beg to differ, with all due respect. Not that everything is rosy, but I don't think you can say such a thing unless you've been in enough places in Africa. I would move back to Namibia in a heartbeat if things go wrong this side. Not that it is going to be a walk in the park: They have their own financial issues, and they buy lots of electricity from Eskom, so they will have their own shortages. Their corruption levels is largely under control.

The main reason I'd go there is quality of life, odd as that might sound, and because the Namibians have a different attitude.

Europe is a good plan B, at least if you're young and still working, but it's a different place. It's expensive to live there. The houses are small and cramped. In some places (The Netherlands for example) you can't find a doctor to fit you in after 5PM... if he will make space for you at all. He's paid by the state and his schedule is full already. He knocks off at 5PM. Try rocking up there with your South African tendencies...

I suppose that is why we call it plan B. Pros and cons.

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2 hours ago, plonkster said:

I beg to differ, with all due respect.

I understand the overall progress of countries in Africa statement from Johan, for all does not begin and end in Namibia. :-)

Love Nam, good people, solid citizens and the shaunas are awesome ... to get STUCK in!. Ok, maybe more in Angola.

And yes Botswana and Zambia (I am told) are some countries trying really hard and succeeding.

Nigeria, Rwanda, Burundi, Libya, Egypt, Algeria, Sudan, Somalia, Ethiopia, DRC, Zimbabwe, Uganda are not where they can be.

And that other little secret, Boko Haram. The further they move down, the bigger the problem for countries in Africa, and us, becomes.

Even SA is unaware of our risk.

http://ewn.co.za/Topic/Boko-Haram-in-South-Africa

So ja, Africa is not for sissies, not if your wife and kids are right there next to you somewhere in Africa.

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I know people who have emigrated all over the globe - but not one who have emigrated into Africa.

If it was’nt for the wildlife very few people would be visiting Africa.

Who wants to look at shacks and very poor people?

Europe rebuild themselves after the Second World War and Africa succeeded to go nowhere. Go to Moz today and observe the effects of a war that has ended many years ago.

If you want to move to Nam go for it. But please look three gemerations into the future and decide whether your offspring will be fine.

Bear in mind that mining is not a finite industry and the point will be reached where all the minerals will be gone. Governments must plan far ahead to replace these income streams. Do you see this happening in Africa? And who wants to move to the DRC mines. Plenty of resources and sh*t with all the greed and corruption.

I think an easy way to see how progressive a nation is to look at how many kilometres of tarred vs untarred roads they have. Also if there are any power stations. Bear in mind that the ANC could nor construct any 100% completed power station in 22 years. All of them are years behind schedule.

Can any African country tackle big construction projects (of any kind) without assistance of funding and manpower from outside Africa?

I would love to see an analysis of this.

And any country where the majority of degrees is in HR (not shooting it down though) can only be in Africa.

So I am too old to move away but maybe my offspring can. I know for sure they will do well in Europe when they emigrate.

Yeah, and our quality of life here is much better for now. But for how long.....

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Boko Haram

Indeed. You know me... I read about this stuff. Haram is the arabic word for something that is banned. Alcohol for example is Haram.

The real war in the world is fought in the domain of ideas, the market place of beliefs. Atheists tell me they have no beliefs... they have no idea. Everyone has beliefs. Even the secular dream (which is very much a European thing) if very much an idea that competes in this war, and (hang on, controversial statement coming), secularists have to thank the guys who came before them for that idea. The trouble, as it seems to me, is that as enough time passes you forget your history. You coast along on some of the residual virtue of your predecessors but you have long forgotten or replaced the roots of that system. And then one day a new opponent shows up (the radical kind) and you find yourself utterly unable to defend against it.

In that sense, Africa is by far the better place to be. With absolutely no insult or suggestion intended: Our Muslim population is not only peaceful but very small. Even if some of those things are under a kind of attack or at least there is pressure on it, for example the issue of language (from government side) and religion (from Hans Peterson) in school, the simple truth is that at this point in time, if you are a religious Afrikaans person South Africa is by far the best place to school your kids. I can't say how long it will last, but for now that is true. It is one of the reasons on my list to stay put.

It is part of what I meant when I asked what your yardstick is. For sure, there are warning signs, and economically things aren't great, but how do things measure up on the ideological scale? That is something people sometimes don't quantify.

I mean you wouldn't move to North Korea even if the weather was good, to use an extreme example. Why would you move to Europe just because the money is better? Yeah I know they are worlds apart... but you rarely think about all the things that make them so different do you? :-)

3 hours ago, Johandup said:

look three gemerations into the future and decide whether your offspring will be fine.

That is a valid point. In Africa, governments rarely last 50 years. It is simply impossible to look 3 generations into the future (trick question though, do you think it will be better in Europe in the next 3 generations?). The best we can do is to make sure that the next generation is a valuable wanted kind of person that has the ability to move whenever necessary, in other words, let future generations make that call. And then make the present call on present circumstances, which among others include one irritating little problem: It takes about seven to ten years to get back where you were if you emigrate. It is not a decision to make lightly.

That's why it's such an emotional issue. It really is a big move.

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17 hours ago, plonkster said:

Collapse is however not an event, it is a process

true. Trick is to act in time before it is to late. My heart is still in the wait and see camp. I think it is to soon to sell and leave (although my brain tells me that I should go now) . To only sell and live in a rented house is no option for me.

 

14 hours ago, Johandup said:

When I look at Africa I see no country that is better off than SA. That's history.

   The reason is clear. South Africa had and still has by far the highest percentage of non African people with a totally different mentality than the indigenes people in Africa. I am not a racist, but the European mentality is simply more suitable for democracy, hard work and progress. If this however ultimately leads to happier people I am not sure. I believe South Africa will slowly move towards the African average in terms of development and African/European population percentage. But Africa is also undoubtedly slowly improving. Our generation will probably never see a prosperous Africa but future generations will. 

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10 hours ago, Johandup said:

I know for sure they will do well in Europe when they emigrate.

With the mass immigration into Europe, Europe is changing, and it is not for the better, it seems. 

Their indigenous populations dwindling, forcing them to get new blood in, but controlled, not skyrocketing as is currently taking place.

I think the major news outlets are keeping it quiet, as it is politically incorrect to mention anything but good news.

That was till Sweden started to face some serious matters lately, London lately taking some stabs (sorry it just came out). Most of the Europe's nations are facing more and more serious crimes, and not from their own citizens.

Coming from SA, our crime levels still tops theirs (generally speaking), but the point is, theirs are escalating fast and their cultures are changing, by force in most cases, and their politicians are powerless.

6 hours ago, plonkster said:

Our Muslim population is not only peaceful but very small.

That is the part where we miss the bigger issue. The majority are peaceful, really good people, the ones I know. And they abhor violence. Problem is the vast majority don't do anything, just distance themselves from the radical extremists, who in the end targets them too.

5 hours ago, Fuenkli said:

... but the European mentality is simply more suitable for democracy, hard work and progress.

I agree.

If Europe stayed out of Africa, leaving Africa to develop at Africa's pace with African values, it could have been a totally different place. Vicious, hard, ruthless and all that ... maybe.

A VERY simplistic view. Europe was forced to harvest and secure resources in a few very short months. African population just moved around as the seasons changed. So Europeans entered Africa, nirvana compared to what they where used to deal with. 

Today we have the conflict all over the continent, the non-European's still the losers overall.

In the end, with some patience: AWA - Africa Wins Again.

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1 hour ago, plonkster said:

controversial statement coming), secularists have to thank the guys who came before them for that idea.

but true, hence the secularist will at all cost avoid acknowledging his heritage and his present obligations and responsibilities regarding the future - he is the man on his own island, die haan op sy eie mishoop [net mis, niks hoop :P], his theme song echoes the last words of frank sinatra's song:

For what is a man, what has he got
If not himself, then he has naught
To say the things he truly feels
And not the words of one who kneels [i.e. prays]
The record shows I took the blows
And did it my way
Yes, it was my way

and that is the problem, of the seven billion people on earth, the vast majority want to do it 'their way'... ignoring the fact that there is but one Way
 

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6 minutes ago, gabriel said:

and that is the problem, of the seven billion people on earth, the vast majority want to do it 'their way'

iPhone, iPad, iPod ... Reminds me of the pick below.

I I I ... Me me me ... My needs, my rights, mine.

My right to use as much water as I want ... :-) 

The more people, the more rights.

We cannot possibly all be right, meet all our own needs, without something giving.

 

iii.jpg

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4 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

we cannot get 6 people below 5kl pm

you are doing EXCEPTIONALLY well!

 

4 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Is does not look promising ... the rains that is.

do not despair, we are in the same boat [no pun intended] "...yet i will rejoice..." hab 3:18

:D

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