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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/08/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    stoic

    Pylontech battery

    Ask @Jaco de Jongh for a quote.
  2. 2 points
    iMercury

    Pylontech battery

    I see solar advice is running a special. Have used them before and got excellent service. Also lots of good reviews on this site and helloPeter. Just South if R20k.
  3. 1 point
    On a practical side we do the following to extend the low temperature in our Bosch A++ freezer: Run it on the lowest temp setting (-26C) We buy the Oasis water sachets (for runners) and freeze these to act as an ice reservoir when the power goes off. We take these with on our Kruger trips. Obviously not now The kWhr consumption on normal fridge freezer units is so high that it pays for itself when upgrading to A++ equipment. I follow these steps even though they are on a good backup system. As we all know backup systems can also trip or fail. When the businesses were closed during lockdown we did not have a single power outage. Now that they are open it’s normal again to get outages.
  4. 1 point
    Energy

    Wind to supplement a Goodwe Inverter

    I'll be happy to push that development for the Victron. Sincerely. Jay
  5. 1 point
    introverter

    new UPS (Future Solar) advise

    Is a late reply but what the heck... any cost related to load shedding is to some extent going to be "throw away". You will likely recoup very little from selling on later, so leave it out of your calculations/decision making - in my opinion. Your core needs on the face of it should easily be met by a 3000W or so inverter (depending on realistic peak load probably even smaller but 3000 is a safe number that will allow wide use). The things to be weary of are those 2 laser printers (they tend to have a very high power draw, easily 1000W+ when starting up) and maybe the bar fridge (if keeping some cokes cold, take it off the list.... if keeping meds for patients at a required temperature then obviously not an option). No idea what aquarium pumps draw but doubt it will be much (though running permanently)... the heater is bit of an unknown (you are not exactly running sea world but it could add up a bit for the battery requirement). So, even though budget is tight, before spending money on inverters I would seriously look at buying/borrowing a watt meter (like this) to confirm actual power draw of things like the TV, aquarium pump + heater, etc. I would personally not spend money on any clone/copy of the axpert type inverters - the money you save will probably be short lived. If going with an axpert type setup look for an actual voltronic produced version (I think the Mecers are voltronic) Hopefully someone else will chime in on the solar part but for what you want PWM should be fine - and may be irrelevant since solar might happen only when you upgrade in the future some time? Overall I think MPPT will give you greater efficiency compared to PWM but I am not exactly all that clued up on solar. Your battery calcs are technically incorrect 24v x 200ah = 4800Wh....or 4.8kWh (not 4800kWh). Making some wild assumptions (and not really making much provision for the laser printers) I suspect your day time practice, home/office and Finding Nemo power requirement to be around 800W-1000W. Which will equate to 2000Wh for a 2 hour load shed (which will be [2000W/24V]/0.8= 105Ah... *2 (for 50%DOD) = ~200Ah). 2 x 12V 200Ah batteries should leave less issues around balancing etc. than 4 x 12V 100Ah batteries. Btw, the inverters on the trolleys are exactly the same as what you will wire into the DB...someone just screwed them down onto a trolley....so if you get a good deal (better than buying a lose inverter) on a trolley for some reason (maybe 2nd hand one?), just remove it from the trolley and have the sparky mount it on the wall. If the only thing you can get/afford is a trolley you could also consider running an extension or two through conduit and route it in a creative way that keeps it mostly off the floor/out of the way so there is no need to push it all over the place... If you want to avoid spending double, and seriously plan to expand in the future (by adding more loads on the backup side and potentially adding decent solar capability), go 48V from the start ...and depending where you are an inverter on the NRS approved list if wanting to add solar.
  6. 1 point
    If you have an energy efficient fridge (like the Bosch A++ I have), you could use a Flexopower Lithium444 to get the job done. Small, portable... and comes in around the price of the Ellies trolley, but WITH batteries (The ellies trolley is like 9k, sans batteries).
  7. 1 point
    plonkster

    Wind to supplement a Goodwe Inverter

    There is a half-finished driver for the Bornay turbines that work with Victron GX devices too. If there is enough demand, maybe that project can get some momentum again... it sort of fizzled out.
  8. 1 point
    Energy

    Wind to supplement a Goodwe Inverter

    Hi Guys. I can do lithium . The Bornay kit. Brochure attached is fully ready for Pylontech. We also expanding to other batterys. Brochure attached. We are in process of testing our More budget freindly machines as well. All is well so far. Sincerely Jason Bornay_Wind_Turbine_Brochure_2020.pdf
  9. 1 point
    The fuse is to protect panels from fire if there is a short in a panel, not protect the inverter's charge controller.
  10. 1 point
    Cooper Power Supplies decent pure sine line interactive ups inverters that can handle continuous loads with large battery banks however they only cater for lead acid batteries their internal chargers are high amperage units so the 1000 va unit can have 2x200 amp batteries in 24v as an example. However going with a Solar inverter will not cost a lot more and you can use lithium batteries with the system and add solar panel later if need be. An Axpert type 3KVA inverter is quite cheap the 2.8KW 24 lithium battery is not unless you go for second life or custom built batteries with lower duty cycles the fact is its a mine field because you get Good quality Axpert clones and then you get the bad clones personally I do not like the Axpert type inverters because they are problematic and unreliable where the line interactive ups inverters are low frequency units that can handle 3 x their rating in surge power for a couple of seconds and Axpert type inverters are high frequency inverters that can only handle 2 x their rating in surge for a couple of milliseconds. The ellies battery trolleys with their little 1200 watt modified sine wave inverters is definately not a great product in my opinion lead acid leasure batteries with very low duty cycles and a modified sine inverter. However my best advice would be to replace the Fridge freezer with a new A+++ fridge freezer and you will not have defrosting problems also you will save a lot of money on electricity..
  11. 1 point
    SteveFury

    Wind to supplement a Goodwe Inverter

    The MPPT controller that comes with the turbine allows for a wide voltage adjustment range this design feature is included in the controller. It connects directly with the lithium battery bank 24v or 48v most of the Bornay turbines have 220v gensets. The MPPT has an RS458 port however I do not know how to integrate monitoring with Victron systems. The are only a few inverter brands I know of that makes specific provisions for wind turbines one of the is Sunsynk range however the Ideal nominal DC Voltage range for the turbine needs to be between 150v and 400v DC the minimum input voltage on a Sunsynk mppt is 125v and startup voltage is 150v so Ideal DC input voltage in my opinion is between 300v and 400v this would mean the turbine will produce power at low wind speeds and peak at 300 or 400 volt. I am in the process of getting my suppliers to supply me with a suitable turbine and controller with the correct DC voltage output on its controller with dumpload to work with the Sunsynk range inverters.
  12. 1 point
    The first four numbers: "2620". Good luck.
  13. 1 point
    RikH

    Planning a new solar install

    I'm sorry, didn't read the entire thread before I posted above. It is already discussed and I would like to add some basic PV knowledge. The max. PV power is the maximum power that the inverter can draw from the panels. So if your panels CAN produce more than that, they just won't because the inverter cannot take more out of them. Compare that to a 2 kW heater that you simply plug in the wall, the inverter powering the outlet can make 5 kW max so will your heater blow up due to too much power? No it will not. It'll take just the 2 kW. So does the inverter work as well, it cannot take more out of the panels than it can use, even if the panels are able to produce more. This phenomenon is called clipping. So you cannot take the max PV power in account as you do with the max voltage. Don't go above that voltage and calculate what the voltage will be on the coldest day you can expect on the location. For the max power you connect I think what is said already 20 to 30% is ok. No need for more, clipping will take the most of the profit.
  14. 1 point
    The BMS can only "take over" by disconnecting the battery totally. That's a bit of a gamble with the inverter's safety. But I'll leave others to comment on this. Depending on which Axpert model you have, it cannot process the Pylon BMS data directly. Hence @Coulomb 's comment that the only feature/function that the BMS will provide is disconnecting the battery for self-protection. But this should only be your emergency last resort (as then your complete system will also shut down). To make use of the accurate SOC data that the Pylon BMS is providing (rather than the crude Axpert voltage guess-timate), you will need something like the ICC software and their Pylon Comms cable. But if you are only planning to run it purely as a backup system, I do not believe that it will add any real value to you. You will be running this till the battery runs out, i.e. this is not an emergency save the silver thing, it's a routine discharge limit. So I'd experiment but start with 45 V or more. You should have the last LED still on (6 SOC LEDs; I assume that 1 LED ≅ 17% SOC, bear in mind I've never used a Pylontech). Better yet if you can read the SOC from the battery, aim to turn off at about 20% SOC. I would also definitely raise it to something higher than 44V. At 22% SOC my Pylons were around 48.6V last night. I have mine set to 46.5V - but have never actually drained my Pylons down to that voltage. I would guess that your current 44V is significantly below the recommended 80% DOD for the Pylon, which means that your expected lifetime cycles will drop. I have never looked at voltage / SOC relation in detail, but my guess would be that somewhere between 48V and 49V. Maybe start with 49V and see (a) if it still gets you through loadshedding without your system shutting down and (b) how many LEDs are still on when your system shuts down One US3000 is quite light to feed "the house", unless you have very light loads. Hopefully, your geyser and other high power draw elements won't be on the inverter's output (so they'll not work during load shedding / outage). +1 If you currently get to the point that your systems shuts down during loadshedding because your Pylon has been discharged down to your current 44V Battery Cutoff Voltage, then you need to add another Pylon or reduce your load during loadshedding. Also please keep in mind that a single Pylon does not like to be discharged by more than 37A - which translates to approx. 1800W. Even though your Axpert can provide more power than that, drawing more than 1800W for longer periods will in the long run hurt your Pylon
  15. 1 point
    25 A is correct for 1 US2000 battery module (and 1 inverter). US3000s can be charged at 37 A, so use 30 A. Please no! 52.5 V. Your battery will be floating 90% of the time. Use 51.8 V for better battery life. This should obviously be lower than your float voltage, so try 51 V. You will be running this till the battery runs out, i.e. this is not an emergency save the silver thing, it's a routine discharge limit. So I'd experiment but start with 45 V or more. You should have the last LED still on (6 SOC LEDs; I assume that 1 LED ≅ 17% SOC, bear in mind I've never used a Pylontech). Better yet if you can read the SOC from the battery, aim to turn off at about 20% SOC. One US3000 is quite light to feed "the house", unless you have very light loads. Hopefully, your geyser and other high power draw elements won't be on the inverter's output (so they'll not work during load shedding / outage). The BMS can only "take over" by disconnecting the battery totally. That's a bit of a gamble with the inverter's safety. But I'll leave others to comment on this.
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