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  1. Hi guys, Just wanted to present to you a new Windows' software tool that we prepared for monitoring of PIP/Axpert inverters and Pylontech batteries. It supports many compatible inverter models. It can work with parallel configurations as well. This was actually the main reason to write the software because a few months ago I upgraded my system from single to 3x inverters and the "pi" solution did not work correct anymore. The software can control switching between battery/grid mode based on Pylontech SOC, and also can control Pylontech max charge current based on the request coming from its BMS. The software can also upload data to emoncms server. Currently the software has only basic reporting, but all inverter/pylon data is stored in local database and we intend to add more reporting options in future. We also added a "console" screen where users can manually send commands to Inverters and Pylontech. The communication with inverters is by USB or RS232 connection. In parallel setups each inverter should be connected with separate cable. I chose this method because reading parallel data from a single inverter is highly inaccurate and slow (at least in the setups where we tested). The Pylontech batteries can be connected by RS232 (console port) or RS485 (to the dedicated RS485 port). You can download the software at http://www.multisibcontrol.net . It is absolutely free now.
    12 points
  2. Version 1.1

    1,762 downloads

    An attempt to simplfy Axpert Menu settings
    12 points
  3. PierreJ

    Victron DIY Install

    Got the sign-off from CoCT about a month ago, so my DIY solar project is finally done and dusted. Thanks to everyone on the forum that provided advice - I probably would have stuffed it up if it wasn't for you. The whole project took about three months of evenings and weekends to finish, and was a welcome distraction from the current state of the world. 4 strings of 4 Canadian Solar 400Wp poly panels in series, facing NNE. Another string of 4 Canadian Solar 400Wp panels in series, facing WNW. All five strings are paralleled together for a combined 8kWp. This is my main DB. CoCT installed a new split prepaid meter. According to the technician that installed it it has built-in reverse power blocking. I have tested it to see what it does when I try to feed in power in to the grid, and it charges me in both directions. That is perfectly fine in my opinion - much preferable to it tripping when there is momentary feed-in. Grid power is measured by an ET112. There is a breaker that connects the main DB to the solar installation in the scullery: Top-left is the AC DB. Top-right is the DC combiner box. Bottom left is the Multiplus II 5kVA inverter, and bottom middle the SmartSolar 250/100 MPPT. The SmartSolar was initially running a bit hot for my liking, so I mounted it on a 6mm thick aluminium plate which brought down peak temperatures from 82C to 65C. Bottom-right is the Victron Cerbo. The battery cabinet on the floor contains 5 PylonTech US2000 batteries for a total nominal capacity of 12kWh. I've set it to 80% DoD: Close-up of the DC buses. Close-up of the AC DB, with and without cover. Close-up of the DC combiner box, with and without cover. The geyser and oven, as well as the swimming pool DB are connected to the main DB, so those are unpowered when there is loadshedding. The AC DB in the scullery is connected to the output of the Multiplus, so all the essential loads stay powered when grid power goes down.
    11 points
  4. Good day All, Over the past couple of months I have received numerous requests to share my NodeRed flows used for monitoring the status of the SunSynk inverter. My initial idea was to package all of the flows into an easy to use package and user interface, however my work loads have not provided me the luxury of time to play around and make it a fool proof system. Please note that the use of these flows are at your own discretion with no liability to either myself, this site nor any members of this site. Do not attempt implement these flows if you are unfamiliar with the working of the ModBus protocol or basic programming. Brief overview of the flows: LoadShedStatus - This flow determines the loadshedding status through a webscraper. I use this information to trigger a secondary set of settings to the inverter in case of load shedding. ModBusRead - This flow is responsible for reading information from the Inverter via the Modbus Flex getter ModBusWrite - This flow is responsible for writing settings back to the inverter via the Modbus flex getter Inverter Monitoring - This flow is responsible for obtaining all of the inverter monitoring values. The values are then send to Home Asssistant via MQTT as well as logged to an InfluxDB for monitoring via Grafana SSFormRead - This flow reads the current system settings from the inverter and display it via the NodeRed UI SSFormWrite - This flow writes any changes made to the system settings via the NodeRed UI back to inverter SSDSRead - This flow reads the "Default Settings" from storage and displays it via the NodeRed UI. I use the "Default Settings" to store my optimal system settings when there is no Load Shedding. SSDSWrite - This flow writes the "Default Settings" from the storage to the Inverter. The flow is also triggered automatically from the LoadShedding status flow SSLSRead - This flow reads the "Load Shedding Settings" from storage and displays it via the NodeRed UI. I use the "Default Settings" to store my optimal system settings when there is no Load Shedding. SSLSWrite - This flow writes the "Load Shedding Settings" from the storage to the Inverter. The flow is also triggered automatically from the LoadShedding status flow TimeMode - This flow triggers different settings on different days of the week. My PV Solar is currently not big enough to carry my whole house, I utilize this flow to feed electricity back into the non-essential loads on the days which my domestic worker is not working. This helps me to optimize my savings on certain days of the week while maintaining healthy battery levels. NodeRed Palettes required for the flows: node-red-contrib-actionflows node-red-contrib-influxdb node-red-contrib-modbus node-red-contrib-queue-gate node-red-contrib-schedex node-red-contrib-simple-gate node-red-dashboard The next couple of posts have been reserved to further expand on the hardware requirements and basic set up of the monitoring. The idea of sharing my flows is to contribute to the community, let us keep this going as a community project by assisting and contributing to project. flows (5).json sunsynk_modbus.docx
    10 points
  5. Congratulations to @hoohloc you have been randomly selected and the winner of a RIOT. Pdf attached. Well done!!! We will be having more give aways very soon! Please PM us your delivery details. Jay riot_cloudlink__a4_pamphlet_electronic_fa.pdf
    10 points
  6. In this video we asked Keith several questions about Sunsynk and its role in South Africa. Keith is based in China and sent us an excellent and informative video to our request. This video interview offers you a strong insight into Keith’s thinking, design philosophy and the journey he took to create Sunsynk and its development. Key Takeaways Kieth is a certified Electrical Engineer Sunsynk started in marine outfitting mainstream shipping and yachts. South Africa is marked as a major market Sunsynk is over 10 years old Sunsynk is developing large scale inverters up to 100kw with imbalance modes Parallel up to 15 Sunsynks together
    10 points
  7. YellowTapemeasure

    Oh No!

    Yes, you are. Firstly, I'm no leftist libertarian, and I am not going to apologise for it, or for thinking the way that I do. In my own case, I have, at my own expense, and using my own (after taxation) money, purchased, installed and paid VAT on infrastructure that will relieve Eskom from their mandate (and until recently monopoly as a sole supplier) to supplying the daily 10kWh that it used to supply me with, sporadically and whenever whenever they felt like it. Their power supply was so erratic and unreliable and I wasn't able to generate any form of reliable income stream working from home. Their inability to fulfill their legislative mandate, I might add, is no fault of my own. The outcome is that as of today, I am able to provide a far more reliable power supply than Eskom, and I do it both day AND night, so Eskom's argument that I am "...forcing them to ramp up power at a faster rate at night" is total rubbish at best and completely economical with the truth . The truth is exactly the other way around. It is because of their inability (for whatever reasons, there are many which I will not go into here) to run a decent utility, (which BTW was at one stage considered the most efficient in the world, notwithstanding the fact that they had a monopoly on supply), that I have had to dig into my own pocket to provide energy for myself. I have incurred personal capital expenditure, and I am faced with current and future maintenance costs for infrastructure which I have, at my own volition, installed in order to meet my needs (to be a productive citizen!?). I am the one taking the risk of a long-term investment (15+ years just to break even) in something that I doubt that I will ever see a return on. In doing so, however, I have relieved them of their duty to supply my home with that 10kWh per day, which, due to their (self-inflicted) shortage, they can distribute and supply to the many in need. For that, I think that at the very least, I (and all the other home solar power users) actually deserve a big "thank you". In fact, Eskom should actually go on its hands and knees to thank home and business solar power owners, for their fortitude, their investment, their long-term commitment to this country, and their ability and bravery to get involved in something which is not their core competency, and which actually helps Eskom deliver (whatever) service (is left) to those less fortunate. Instead, Eskom decides that we are the enemy, and punishes us with additional taxation An interesting strategy
    9 points
  8. I'm really sorry @Luminous , but there's not much interesting to share. Just everyday's boring stuff. For example, I had to clearly label the bays in my space-shuttle landing dock, as some (female) family members were not able to clearly understand where they should (NOT) park: Based on the current situation in the world, I upgraded to the AirLock. You know, just in case something goes wrong: And yes, I bought another rack cabinet, so if I will accidentally become a billionaire one day, I will not have a problem with storing some additional lithium for my LAB:
    9 points
  9. Tim

    Another Blue Install

    Sorry about the title - seems to be a forum rib of sorts ? Anyway here is my install - was quite challenging doing it all myself with little solar experience. Silly things like just getting inverter on the wall (thing ways a ton) , thank goodness for climbing gear and pulleys, made it a steep learning curve. Hopefully the forum wolves will be kind though . System :Victron Inverter - Quattro 10000va / Victron 250/100 SmartSolar MPPT / 20 x 330 Watt Canadian Solar / Victron BMV702 / Revov 10 kWh / Venus GX running ESS / ET112 Grid Meter / Home Assistant Integration. In case you wondering system is limited that it can’t feed more than 4.6kW into grid. Things I would have done differently: - Bigger fuse boxes & bit more spacing - 35mm2 wire is difficult to bend - Wider trucking - same reason as above My average use is 30-35 kWh per day - system is producing 18kWh on average (mid winter) per day - looking forward to summer. The Battery is on paper too small as most use is in evening, however in Port Elizabeth we can Grid tie one to one and we are on Eskom time of use tariffs, so battery only needs to get me through the 2 peak periods, then use the grid as a cheap battery for balance of time. With the home automation (Home Assistant) tie-in, I manipulate a few things on system via Modibus to optimise the return: System makes sure batteries are charged for morning and evening peak using grid if needed - (buys cheaper power or uses credit generated during day). I do this by changing the Grid set point higher for this period. If there is loadshedding (it reads the loadshedding status form Eskom website) - it changes min SOC from 20% to 50% - that way there is enough capacity in batteries to get through any loadshedding episodes regardless of time of day. Also notifies me of grid failure over google home and on phone Pic 1 - Christmas - trying to figure everything out Pic 2 - figuring out cable routes - old inverter/ups in green looking sad Pic 3 - Old Main Db Board (nice excuse to tidy up) Pic 4 - Honey will we have lights tonight ? - no pressure - all stripped out Pic 5 - Main Db Looking bit more tidy - split into 2 - Db1 non critical AC loads - Oven and Geyser on Left ELU - Db3 - Critical Loads - balance of house - plugs and lights (Note Inverter feeds back up to DB1 if grid present so DB1 is on Inverter / solar /battery until there is a grid failure) Pic 6 - Revov Batteries 10 KWh- server rack box adapted with some additional home made welded brackets (its a 50kg load) - but nicely off the floor Pic 7 - DC Buss-bar - cramped DC shunt and fuse box - will know for next time - give yourself more room Pic 8 - AC DB 2 - feeds to and from Db 1/D b3 with 3 way change over switch (can bypass inverter if its faulty) - MPPT on left - Solar DC DB & fuses on right Pic 9 - Solar DB - only partly my work that''s why is so neat - 4 strings of 5 panels - bottom 2 cables have subsequently been increased to 10mm2 from 6mm2 shown here - MPPT was kicking errors - seems happier now Pic 10 - Overview of installation - Inverter quite noisy (I am noise sensitive) - so nice to be in the garage vs in house Pic 11 - Colour GX and BMV installed round corner (more accessible) Pic 12 - Panels - 20 x 330W - 4 strings of 5 - 5 deg - facing NE - raised back 5 because of shading Pic 13 - Home Assistant Home Automation Tie in - Note loadshedding sensor (still working on overall layout but its 100% customisable) Pic 14 - Municipal Grid-tie meter with ET112 Grid Meter on right
    9 points
  10. After my installation I started playing with my new "TOY" but quickly realize that it's not going to perform to the levels I wanted to. So like any software developer I started developing my own software. I wanted to achive the following goals: - Generated max power, use the power as long as posisble, switch over to grid when needed - Automaticlly change the power management for load-shedding - Protect my batteries against high power usage by switching over to grid when power usage exceed X for a few minutes and back when usage recovered - Only switch to Solar when Batteries is over X voltage and Solar is over X Watt (provide to levels) - Switch over to Grid in the afternoon when Solar is under X level or Time. - Identify Low average power generation (Clouds, Rain) - For Load-Shedding - Move from Solar Charge only to Solar/Grid when batteries are very low or for Load-shedding I also wanted the system to look "Cool" and I wanted to make it accesable from a browser. Bought a Raspberrypi and screen... Here is the results...so much fun... still learning
    9 points
  11. Travis

    Bought a BMW i3

    Morning, So after a few years of using my Land Cruiser as a daily driver I decided to bite the bullet on a electric car. I have chosen the BMW i3 REX It has a 22KW (18.8KW usable) 60Ah Lithium battery giving you a range of 130-160km (200km in ECO PRO + mode) and with the REX (Petrol range extender) you get 260-290km I got the model with all the drive assist options, so it has active cruiser control and can drive itself in traffic upto 60KM/h I ran the battery to 6% yesterday as a test. Drove 157km. Used 18kw to charge. At the peak price of 0.81c per KW, it cost R15. That is 1.1L of petrol equivalent or 0.7L per 100km I am chuffed. As a bonus it is comfortable to drive and quicker off the line than most car at the robots! Shout if you guys have any questions of want a test drive
    9 points
  12. How to charge your Pylontech US3000 and why From time to time, there's a discussion on Pylontech US2000/US3000 batteries and what is the best charging voltage for them. So, here's the answer based on my personal experience: C.C. = 52.5V C.V. = 52.0V Why: First of all, it's important to clarify what the term "charging voltage", sometimes referred as C.C. aka constant current, means. It's NOT the voltage that's being created by the charger and then applied to the battery terminals. In reality, the charger just pushes current into the battery, while constinuously measuring the voltage on the terminals. Once the voltage reading on the terminals is equal to the value that's set as charging voltage, the charger stops pushing current. Then, based on the selected charging profile, the charger goes in the next stage, like C.V. aka constant voltage, for example. If the C.C. voltage is set too high, the charger will continue to push the current in the batteries for too long. The voltage will rise above the safe level for that given battery chemistry and the cells will overcharge, swell and take damage. In order to protect the cells, US3000 has a balancer for each individual cell and a MOSFET for each brick. Once the voltage of the individual cell goes above 3.480V, the balancer will kick-in and start to burn the excessive current, turning the electric energy into heat. That's the way how US3000 ensures that at the end of charging all the cells have equal voltage, in other words "are balanced". Of course, cell balancers are not powerfull enough to burn all the energy that might be potentially pushed by the charger. That's the reason why there's a MOSFET in the battery pack. If all the balancers are already burning energy and the charger is still pushing energy, then the MOSFET will limit the current in order to protect the pack. In the specsheet, Pylontech recommend to set the charging voltage somewhere between the 52.5V to 53.5V: There's 15 LFP cells in each US3000 pack and balancers are starting at voltage 3.480V per cell: 15 x 3.480V = 52.2V So, the setting C.C. to 52.5V (52.2V + 0.3V) ensures that all the balancers will operate correctly and at the same time, they won't be overloaded. If your solar charger is actively communicating with the US3000 via CAN bus or RS485, then he can read the battery voltage via this digital communication. Therefore, it does not matter how long the battery-to-charger cables are and whether the charger itself is measuring accurate or not. The voltage is measured by the BMS and communicated digitally. In that case, the best is to set C.C. to 52.5V. If your solar charger does NOT utilize BMS comunication, then he has to rely on his own voltage measurements. In that case, one has to take into account the length of the battery-to-charger cables, all the joints resistance and the associated voltage drop. Therefore, it might be necessary to adjust C.C. to a higher value, like 52.6V or 52.7V for example. There's nothing you can break if you will experiment and raise the C.C. slowly in order to find the best value for your setup. Just be sure to stay away from the maximum allowed voltage as described in the specsheet. While the specsheet allows charging voltage up to 53.5V, it's not a good idea: The higher voltage puts a higher load the balancers, mosfet and on the cells too. All the excessive energy is wasted and turned into heat. And the heat is generally not good for the cells, of course. Second reason, why setting the C.C. to the maximum is not a good choice is the fact, that during the charging there might be occasional spikes of power that will go to the battery. Sometimes these spikes are caused by the charger algorithm itself, sometimes they are caused by a changing light conditions or by turning ON/OFF bigger loads. Once this happens during the charging, and the battery is already at it's 53.5V maximum, the BMS will sense the overvoltage and throws an error. If not corrected immediatelly, it will shutdown the battery. How to set C.V. voltage: The LFP cells used in US3000 have a resting voltage 3.2V per cell. Technically, there's no "float" voltage that you need to apply to LFP, like is common in the Lead-Acid world. LFP cells are best to be charged and then disconnected. This is based on the fact that you can overcharge and damage a LFP cell even with 100mA of current, if applied for a long time. On the other hand, in solar applications it's impossible to disconnect the batteries from inverter once fully charged, since the batteries are acting as an energy buffer 24x7. Therefore, it's good to set C.V. to a value that will supply just a tiny amount of current into the batteries in order to keep them topped, and live with the fact that balancers will kick-in from time to time and will waste some energy by turning it into heat. With some other types of batteries, where balancers are visible, you can see this state - LED on each balancer blinks randomly, once per second or two. It's like a heartbeat. For a shame, Pylons don't have this direct visibility and you have to go into CLI, if you want to see what's going on inside the battery. Based on that, I'm personally using C.V. = 52V, so the balancers are not wasting excessive amounts of energy, and operate only when really needed. US3000 battery: Phantom BMS sitting inside a Pylontech battery: CLI info for a stack of 8xUS3000: pylon_debug>pwrsys Power System Information --------------------------------- System is discharging Total Num : 8 Present Num : 8 Sleep Num : 0 System Volt : 49756 mV System Curr : -17724 mA System RC : 558692 mAH System FCC : 588892 mAH System SOC : 94 % System SOH : 100 % Highest voltage : 3319 mV Average voltage : 3317 mV Lowest voltage : 3315 mV Highest temperature : 22000 mC Average temperature : 21500 mC Lowest temperature : 20000 mC Recommend chg voltage : 53250 mV Recommend dsg voltage : 47000 mV Recommend chg current : 118400 mA Recommend dsg current : -296000 mA Command completed successfully Note one interesting information: The stack has 592Ah of nominal capacity, but the recommended charging current, advertised by the BMS, is 118A = C/5. Recommended discharging current, advertised by the BMS, is 296A = C/2. No matter what values (much bigger) are being promoted in the specsheet, I would say that the battery designer had a very good reason why he hardcoded C/5 and C/2 into the BMS as recommended Amps. CLI info on the 1st brick: pylon_debug>info Device address : 1 Manufacturer : Pylon Device name : US3000A Board version : PHANTOMSAV10R03 Main Soft version : B65.6 Soft version : V1.3 Boot version : V1.4 Comm version : V2.0 Release Date : 18-09-12 Barcode : PPTAH02 Specification : 48V/74AH Cell Number : 15 Max Dischg Curr : -100000mA Max Charge Curr : 102000mA EPONPort rate : 1200 Console Port rate : 115200 Command completed successfully State of Health for 15 cells in the 1st brick: pylon_debug>soh Power 1 Battery Voltage SOHCount SOHStatus 0 3317 0 Normal 1 3317 0 Normal 2 3318 0 Normal 3 3317 0 Normal 4 3317 0 Normal 5 3318 0 Normal 6 3318 0 Normal 7 3319 0 Normal 8 3316 0 Normal 9 3316 0 Normal 10 3317 0 Normal 11 3318 0 Normal 12 3319 0 Normal 13 3317 0 Normal 14 3318 0 Normal Command completed successfully Statistics for the oldest brick in a stack of 8: pylon_debug>stat 8 Device address 8 Data Items : 0 HisData Items : 2048 MiscData Items : 122 Charge Cnt. : 0 Discharge Cnt. : 3180 Charge Times : 31004 Status Cnt. : 3179 Idle Times : 41151 COC Times : 0 DOC Times : 0 COCA Times : 0 DOCA Times : 0 SC Times : 0 Bat OV Times : 0 Bat HV Times : 0 Bat LV Times : 0 Bat UV Times : 0 Bat SLP Times : 0 Pwr OV Times : 0 Pwr HV Times : 0 Pwr LV Times : 0 Pwr UV Times : 0 Pwr SLP Times : 0 COT Times : 0 CUT Times : 0 DOT Times : 0 DUT Times : 0 CHT Times : 0 CLT Times : 0 DHT Times : 0 DLT Times : 0 Shut Times : 1 Reset Times : 14 RV Times : 0 Input OV Times : 0 SOH Times : 0 BMICERR Times : 0 CYCLE Times : 62 Pwr Percent : 95 Pwr Coulomb : 254001600 Dsg Cap : 4614627 [email protected] Cnt : 0 [email protected] Cnt : 0 HT Cnt : 0 LT Cnt : 0 LV Cnt : 0 LifeWarn Times : 0 LifeAlarm Times : 0 Command completed successfully Note the Cycle Times, this brick has 62 full cycles on it's meter. One full cycle is accounted whenever you discharge a full nominal capacity from the pack. Hope the above info will help someone to understand how to treat these batteries. Youda
    9 points
  13. Youda

    Youda's off-grid LAB

    Hi guys, so, if you want to check the status of your Pylontech Phantom-S, US2000 or US3000, there's a great diagnostic tool for this called BatteryView. *DISCLAIMER: *Please note that with the information written below, you can effectively destroy your batteries, or invalidate your warranty. *Do what you like, but I take no responsibility for your actions and results. First, you have to create a Serial Console cable, as no such cable comes in the box with the batteries. Here's the wiring: Plug the RJ-11 connector of the cable into the CONSOLE PORT of the TOP BRICK of you battery stack. Just to be sure, the top brick is the one that have LinkPort0 EMPTY. Next, plug the cable into your laptop's serial port, or USB2Serial adapter. Launch the app and choose the serial port name according to your's laptop configuration. IE COM1, COM2, COM6... Baudrate is 115200. If you have more Pylon bricks stacked, then check the "Parallel" box and select the number of bricks that you have in a single stack. Click OK to connect to the BMS. If you did everything correctly, the app will scan all the bricks and will show you the operational parameters, like cell voltages, current, temperature, SoC... There's a couple more charts available under the "Windows" menu, like Voltage/Amps curve, etc. Be carefull, as this tool is used also for updating firmware. So, don't screw up your battery... For the experts, there's even a possibility to open a CLI, where you can query much more detailed info. You can SET the values, test the circuits, perform shutdown, etc. This CLI is so powerfull, that it's actually scary. Well, if you're not a certified Pylontech expert, don't touch it, please! ATTACHMENT: BatteryView.zip
    9 points
  14. superdiy

    Battery cooler box

    One of my recent projects, the battery cooler box. The temperature in my garage easily reaches 35°C in summer - on average it is in the lower 30's. According to the T105RE's datasheet, any lead-acid battery should be kept at 25°C or lower and an increase of 10°C halves the expected life of the batteries. Therefor I decided to keep them cool... The box is constructed from 50mm coldroom panels and is attached to a plywood base fitted onto an angle-iron frame with castors. The inside of the box is watertight and coated with stone-chip - the stuff used to coat the chassis of trailers and caravans. The compressor assembly is from an old ice-machine The temperature is controlled by a temperature controller bought on ebay - it is set to turn the compressor on at 25.2°C and off at 24.8°C The internal circulation fan is on when the compressor is on and switches off approximately 20 minutes after the compressor has cycled off. The air pump is controlled by a digital programmable timer and used to force air into the box and to force any gas build-up out of the box - the outlet still needs to be connected to a hose to take the gasses outside. Hydrogen, which is highly explosive, is released during charging and Hydrogen Sulfide, which is extremely poisonous, might be released during over-charging. Hydrogen is less dense than air and Hydrogen Sulfide is more dense than air and therefor the need for two gas outlets, one at the top and one at the bottom of the box. The control panel contains a battery fuse The shunt of the Vicron battery monitor is mounted inside the control-section of the box and the RJ12 connection is extended to the rear panel A 40mm drain connection is mounted on the side of the box in case the box needs to be flushed. The drain connection is kept closed by a lever valve. Swimming pool hoses fit tightly into the 40mm drain connection and can be connected to take the water etc. to the outside of the building, if needed. An Anderson connector for the battery connection is mounted on the rear panel
    9 points
  15. I've recently purchased and installed the following: 1 x Growatt SPF 5000TL HVM 5kVA/5kW Hybrid Inverter. 2 x Pylontech US3000 batteries. 1 x Pylontech cable kit with RJ45 BMS comms cable included. I've just spent 5 days communicating with Growatt in China to figure out why I could not get the inverter to communicate with the BMS on the master battery properly. After many, many emails back and forward, and far too many hours of research online, I finally got it right today and I think it is worth sharing this information here, in case anybody else needs it, because I couldn't find the right information anywhere on the internet, all in one place, explained properly. It turns out that the Growatt SPF5000 has to be connected to the Pylontech batteries differently to the way Axpert inverters are connected to Pylontech batteries. Everything I was reading online was saying that you need to plug the RJ45 comms cable into the CAN port on the master battery and then into the BMS port on the inverter, and then you need to set the battery type to Li (setting 05 on Axpert and Growatt inverters) and then choose Li profile L02 (also apparently the same for Axpert and Growatt inverters). It turns out, the Growatt does NOT communicate via the CAN port. It communicates via the RS485 port that is positioned below the CAN port on the master battery. And in addition to that, it requires a 9600 baud rate, which you can set using the 4 small white dipswitches on the master battery. For the Growatt you must set those dipswitches to: 1 0 0 0 (ON OFF OFF OFF) When connected to the CAN port and put into Li (L02) mode, the Growatt inverter faults and gives an error 20 and an error 04 constantly. When connected to the RS485 port with the dipswitches set to 1000, comms is immediately established and it works as intended. I also installed 2 firmware updates on the inverter, that were sent to me by Growatt in China (who were very helpful through this entire process despite not actually giving me the information I actually needed to solve this), but in retrospect I actually wonder if those firmware updates even made a difference because I was able to put the inverter into Li (L02) mode before applying those firmware updates anyway, I just didn't know about the RS485 port and the dipswitches. Recommended configuration process 1. Turn inverter on but run off battery only. Disable A/C input and A/C output (use isolator switches if you have them). 2. Go to setting 5 and select battery type = Li. Then select profile L02 (This is specifically for Pylontech batteries). Push ESC to return to home screen. Go back to setting 5 and verify that it was saved as Li. 3. Now shutdown the inverter and batteries completely. Turn the batteries off using the on/off flip switch, not just the red button on the master battery. 4. Now make sure that the end of the comms cable on the battery side (it will probably have a little sticker on it that says BAT) is plugged into the RJ45 port labelled RS485 that is below the CAN port. And also make sure that the other end is plugged into the RJ45 port labelled BMS on the inverter and NOT into the other RJ45 port that is labelled RS485 (Yes, I know, it's weird, just go with it). 5. Now set the 4 little white dipswitches to: ON OFF OFF OFF (1000). 6. Now turn the batteries back on and then turn the inverter back on. You should no longer see any fault codes or the red fault light. How to tell that the inverter really is communicating with the BMS properly 1. You should now see a little Li symbol next to the battery icon on the home screen of the inverter, and that Li symbol should NOT be flashing. When it's not flashing and is solid it means comms is working. 2. If you go and look at most of the battery values on the status screens or in settings related to battery level (SOC) you should now see percentage values where there were voltage values before. Setting 21 is a good example of that. I hope this helps somebody else because the information available online with regards to the Growatt routers is of no help in this regard and most of the information available relates to Axpert inverters, which appear to be very similar to the Growatt at face value, but communicate with the Pylontech batteries differently from what I can see.
    8 points
  16. I happened across this today: https://www.mppsolar.com/v3/pylontech/ "We are pleased to announce that our MPI Hybrid inverter family is now ready to support Pylontech US2000B Plus lithium batteries, through the newly added BMS support via RS485 card" At the end, it used to say: "Note: PIP-GK and PIP-MK starting Dec 2018 will also be able to work with Pylontech lithium batteries." [ Edit: the above disappeared for a few weeks, then was replaced with this: "PIP-GK and PIP-MK 48V models (5048GK, 5048MK), starting January 2019, will be updated with special firmware PCB for use with Pylontech Lithium batteries. Users simply simply have to connect a BMS cable (supplied separately upon request) directly from the GK/MK's reserved BMS port to the Pylontech's BMS port and it is automatic compatibility." In this post, we find out that models that don't come with this support can't be updated to add this support without extra hardware, and the only solution is to replace the entire unit. ] MPI hybrids are the MPP Solar name for the Infinis. The off-grid models with K in the name are the more modern ones with the removable displays. Edit: The PIP-GKs are also known as the Axpert VM III, and the PIP-MK are also known as the Axpert King. [ Edit: added "it used to say". Then added newer text from MPP Solar. Added note about old hardware not being upgradeable. ]
    8 points
  17. Hello All. To celebrate passing the 10k user mark we will be having a give away to the value of R4900 to a randomly selected active forum member. This will happen on Monday. Stay Tuned! Sincerely Jay
    8 points
  18. Version 3.10

    244 downloads

    Reading live data from Goodwe ES Power Inverters from Local Area Network for Windows XP, 7, 8.1 and 10. Shows data sent by UDP packets. Installation instructions inside the .zip file. Please comment on any errors found. Any suggestion is welcome. Version 1.0: November 7, 2020 Version 2.0: January 22, 2021 Version 3.0: May 16, 2021 Youtube short video In Operation: Version 1.0.
    8 points
  19. In December 2020, I unfortunately fell victim to a lightning surge from the grid. Various items in my house was impacted. Thankfully my Axpert inverters(x2) survived with no issues, although the Raspberry Pi that runs ICC was effected, Pi booted but USB and network ports dead. My Pylontech bank(5 x US2000 Plus) was impacted as well. The communication ports(console, RS485, CAN etc) was impacted on all 5 Pylontech modules. Fortunately they were still charging and discharging normally but i could not get any info from them. I sent them back to the supplier to get a full report. The report stated that the CMU boards in all 5 modules had to be replaced and Pylontech warranty does not cover surges, so I had to claim from insurance. Got all approvals and all boards were replaced. I commissioned the entire bank after the repairs was done. After a few days I was noticing that 2 modules cell voltages was going over 3.65v during charge and these units were throwing High Voltage and Over voltage errors in the logs. When this happens, it stopped accepting any current and waits for those effected cells voltages to drop below 3.5v before accepting a charge again. This happened over a few days and the SOH counts were increasing for these 2 modules. I decided to pull them out of the bank and to my surprise they were swollen! I was actually was shocked(no pun) when I saw this. I returned those 2 modules back to the supplier and there new report concluded that the cells are damaged from the surge and irrepairable. Their recommendation was to replace those 2 modules, which i did with a US3000C and a US2000. I collected the damaged modules and in the spirit of science, being inquisitive and sharing knowledge I decided to salvage some parts before disposing the cells. I took the following pics: Bottom cover off, we can see 3 x 16v battery packs(notice them being swollen), connected in series. Power Management Unit(PMU) board on the bottom left and Communication Management Unit(CMU) on the bottom right. PMU Top: PMU Bottom, notice all the MOSFETS here.... this side of the board is attached to a heatsink situated on the front right top side of an installed module: CMU Top: CMU Bottom: LED Strip: Internal power cable size 8AWG - 10mm2: Battery Packs: If you counted, there are 10 pouches per pack. A total of 30 pouches in a single US2000 Plus module, equates to 1.6v per pouch. BatteryView software shows 15 cells, so i am guessing that 2 pouches make up a cell of 3.2v. Enjoy the pics.
    8 points
  20. Seeing as the 'smart' home bug has bitten me in a bad way, I've been working on integrating all the various bits of electronics in the house. One of the obvious things to get integrated is the power monitoring side and in my case, a Goodwe 5048ES inverter. I'm using Home Assistant as my automation system and there is integration for this available, but only to the SEMS portal. This won't do, as the SEMS portal isn't great, it sits in the cloud and it only updates every 5 minutes or so. Ideally you want to integrate directly to the inverter and get much more frequent updates, but I couldn't find anything that is integrated directly. Looking at the inverter there's a few RS485 ports available, so it might be possible to get some data off this. But it's also possible that these are only for battery integration or otherwise unused. So, I figured a more elegant way would be to try and talk to the inverter through the network seeing as it's sitting there already. Again, there's pretty much no information available on achieving this but I figured it was worth a try. Running PV master on a mobile device and a packet sniffer running in the background, I managed to log some interesting data in order to allow me to talk to the inverter through it's network interface. I've made some progress, but this is very much a work in progress; decoding the data is a bit of a challenge but I think I'm about halfway identifying all the data. I'm posting this here as hopefully someone else has a bit more insight and can help filling in the missing blanks, or at the very least, it might help someone with a bit more smarts to crack it properly. Basically, the communication between PV Master and the inverter is in the form of UDP packets with the inverter listening on port 8899. Because it's UDP, it's connectionless. There's no need to explicitly connect to the inverter (as would be the case for a TCP connection), it simply sits and listens for the relevant requests and then broadcasts back with the results. Nice and simple, although (because of the inherent handicap of the UDP protocol) there's no guarantee that there will be a response. In testing I've had responses from the inverter in most cases, but it did happen where the response went missing. So, you'll have to make sure your implementation is robust enough for this case and for ensuring that all the data packets do arrive and that they are complete. There is a checksum in the inverter's protocol in order to validate the data, but it's something to take note of. There's a few requests you can send the inverter, and based on that the inverter can respond with things like it's model/serial, it's status or confirmations whens you change settings. For the most part I'm only interested in getting the inverter status. Interestingly, there's no authentication mechanism. You fire off the request, and the inverter will answer - provided your request makes sense. I've attached a document outlining the information I was able to decode from the information request response from the inverter. Still a few blanks there but the results are encouraging. In order to get the response below, you need to issue the following bytes to inverter IP on port 8899: 0xaa, 0x55, 0xc0, 0x7f, 0x01, 0x06, 0x00, 0x02, 0x45. The 6th byte is the request type and the 9th byte is the checksum. For the purposes of this exercise I won't go to deep into the various requests you can send to the inverter.
    8 points
  21. We needed a UPS for a small office (about 8 PC's, server and network hardware) to be able to continue working through loadshedding (4-6 hours at a time). We are renting our office and did not want a permanent setup. Requirements: - Ultimate long term reliability - high quality brand - Expected lifetime: about 15 years for inverter and 7-10 years for batteries (expecting much more regular loadshedding while eskom repairs its infrastructure) - Backup system that works for many years without maintenance - Standalone system ( rack on wheels) - Ready to be moved to a new office if we have to move, OR be re-purposed into a solar home ESS system (just add MPPT and panels) If we bought an off the rack 3KVA UPS system with 6000 WH runtime, we could probably get it for about R20k. But I have a long history with cheap UPS systems - they never make it to 2 years - then you have to replace the batteries - at huge cost, labour - weekend time etc. At about 4 or 5 years the inverter's cheap capacitors start sweating and it becomes very unreliable - almost worse than not having a UPS. Not one lasts over 6 years - and in the process, the PC's that you are supposed to protect are subjected to many power spikes and failures due to the unreliable UPS. So we went this route - about 4X more expensive but we know it will last, and protect the sensitive equipment properly for many years: - Victron Multiplus 3000 - Victron Venus controller - 2 X Pylontech US3000 batteries - 19" computer rack on wheels - Small DB with input breaker, earth leakage on output, and two circuits on output. - DC Fuses, cables and building the rig (took about 5 hours). @Jaco de Jongh built this rig for me:
    8 points
  22. Travis

    Bought a BMW i3

    So almost 2 years after starting this thread my BMW i3 has done 45,000KMs. This technology is a game changer. Just the concept of not needing a "service" every year requires a mind shift. The service items for the i3 are brake fluid and vehicle check every 2 years! Having had the first i3 in South Africa for some years, it is now time to sell as the 120Ah (+-44Kwh) model is coming soon. It's amazing to me that BMW has managed to double the battery capacity of the i3 in 4 years. Mine was a 60Ah (22KW) This has been my favourite car to drive. You have to experience it to understand. It's is relaxing and thrilling at the same time and I have not gotten bored of it for even a moment! In 45000KMs the battery has lost 3% of capacity and my "fuel consumption" has been 15.7kWh/100km. My average recuperation has been 5.3kWh/100km. We pay R1 per kWh, so the car cost me R7000 to run in electricity, excluding any solar offset. In reality it was almost free. I used 50L of fuel, meaning I filled the 9L tank about 5 times. This means in the time I had the car, I drove roughly 800km's on the Range Extender petrol generator (Rex). I found that I could get roughly 120km's electric only before needing the REX. The battery lasted me 2-3 days on average, though I mostly charged it daily. The times I used the REX was mostly on long trips. The one surprise with the i3 is that it seems to pickup punctures on it's narrow eco tires. I had 3 punctures over 2 years driving in JHB. Luckily replacement tires don't cost the world (R2200 Bridgestone) and the compressor kit works fine. I had the punctures plugged, but replaced the front tires at 35000km's. The future of electric looks very bright and I cannot wait to have an i3 with double the range or to get behind the wheel of a Tesla in South Africa!
    8 points
  23. ebrsa

    InfiniSolar V USB protocol

    All I have to share are a few facts that I have learnt in my many decades through life which are edging towards eight although thankfully not quite. So perhaps some may reason that I am already senile. All those who have expressed views on this thread, have probably at some time or another contributed to the welfare of others. But as an absolute believer in capitalism as opposed to socialism with it's terror, misery and death, I am convinced that capitalism can only function in a state of complete individual freedom which by definition prevents one to do harm unto others. @Energy this is economics, not politics and I am glad that individual freedom is not included in the list of prohibited subjects. That as a basis for discussion. 1. @Manie developed a commercial product that was and is probably still purchased by at least a fair number of the members of this forum and others. In the process he obviously spent many long hours of hard work of which the users of ICC-Pi are and will be reaping the benefits at a price acceptable to them. When members started requesting ICC for Windows, Manie knuckled down and produced that in record time and again some bought the program. It is a basic principle of sound business practice to protect your intellectual property. If one obtained critical and valuable information from another source, other than open source, which would be freely available in any event, you would be particularly foolish to hand it out like a bowl of soup at a soup kitchen. The Japanese say "Business is war" and see where it got them, in record time, after the devastation of WW2. There have been many demands for Manie to release his code as open source. Where would that have taken us users of ICC. Already a formal association between two developers did not last long. I would rather pay for the software and know there is some help at the end of a communications channel of whatever nature. It also denies Manie his right of freedom to decide what he does with his code. If he makes the wrong decisions, it may go the same route to oblivion of AICC which after all was a fine program. Solarmon also looked equally promising and it too bit the dust, or so it seems. If Manie chooses to improve his product over time, then the only other factor of price will determine the volumes sold. I for one hope he does continue development for purely selfish reasons of wanting to use an application that is enhanced on a continuing basis. As the outspoken Ayn Rand titled one of her books "The Virtue Of Selfishness" and then went on to prove it. 2.Those who have voluntarily contributed did so on their own accord. If they wanted compensation, they should have negotiated it before saying their bit. What on earth prevent the proponents of an open source program to start such a project. There has been enough demands for it but so far zero action, to my perhaps admittedly limited knowledge. I am of course only interested in the Axpert MKS range, which is what I have. Those who need something different, must drum up their own support. 3. Jay as moderator has the power to stop trends in any thread dead in their tracks if he believes them to be contrary to the intentions of the forum. It is to his credit that he allowed the many tsunamis in a teacup. But relentless efforts to bludgeon an opposing view into submission leads to the type of avoidable friction that we have often witnessed. If co-operative efforts, proposed by some, had any chance of success, The United Nations would be a shining example instead of a money wasting ineffectual fiasco, persistently wasting other people's money. 4. I realise that my views are contrary to some who have in the past willingly helped me and I hope in some small way I also managed to contribute something of value. But having differences of opinion does not make us enemies. It demonstrates the ability to actually think, a rarity in the world we live in, as well as maturity. Let us add respect for individual freedom to it, with emphasis on individual. Now this may be the proverbial stone at a hornet's nest and if true, so be it.
    8 points
  24. PaulF007

    Emoncms Startup Tutorial

    I thought Ill give a quick startup tutorial for first time user of emoncms. Now some of the images might not be exactly as the .org site but the principle stays the same. Also this will be just how to start your first feed and new dash , the possibilities is infinite when it comes to editing the das extra and also the idea is not to write a full manual on the subject , so here goes. Once your software has started to log the data to emoncms you will need to inputs page to verify that the data is there: In the input page you will see a list of all data received by emon but it will not be logged yet in the DB so to start give the input a meaningful name: Once done you will start to create you first feed by selecting the "wrench" on the far right: This will bring up the menu for creating a new feed. Below is a short description of the options involved and there a many to chose from but for this quick tutorial I will stick to the basics. The more you play with emon the more you will get to learn what this powerful interface can do for you. The main thing here is to "math" you interval to whatever you will receive you data at. Anything soner will not make any difference to emon an will lead to "duplicate" values. Once you have added the new feed. it will now show in your inputs feed. Save a close the page. Next go to you feeds page to view the new feed that was created. To make this feed public double click on the lock to make the feed public else it would not show on your dash unless your are logged into your emoncms. That is all that you will need to do in your feed menu as the data is now been logged into emoncms.Next you will need to log into your dashboard to create , name and save a new dash. Here is a overview of the dash options: Click on the dash edit and you will arrive at the blank dash now you can start to play with all the widgets and feed values to whatever you want it to look like! Hope this will give you a good idea as to how to start up with emoncms! Enjoy. Paul
    8 points
  25. As much as I like this Inverter I just received some sad news about it. For a while now I have been in contact with the Taiwan factory, I have heard through the grapevine that new firmware was released. I was trying to get hold of it, but failed to do so. About 2 weeks ago they confirmed that my Inverters will not take this update due to hardware constraints. I decided to leave it at that and started driving the NRS-certification issue. I started contacting everybody could about this issue and just received an mail back from them. BAD NEWS: The InfiniV DID NOT pass the test, it will not receive the NRS-certification. GOOD NEWS: The INFINISOLAR V 2, has all ready been build, with all the hardware&software upgrades and will be released early next year, NRS approved and certified. EVEN BETTER NEWS: They Offered me two options: 1. They can fully refund me or 2: They can replace my 2 units with upgraded ones........ For Free.
    8 points
  26. Gerald_db

    i3 Rex bought.

    i3 being recharged from my solar powered house. Perfect. Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk
    8 points
  27. Happy anniversary to me! 1 year off grid!
    8 points
  28. Leshen

    Sunsynk 8kw Inverter

    Hi Guys. My new installation. 24 x 390w JA Mono solar panels with an 8kw Sunsynk inverter and 2 x 5kwh Bull Lithium batteries. More pics to follow soon...
    7 points
  29. Faced with the costs of "Wonder Gadgets" to heat water from excess solar availability, I have come up with a different way of doing it.... I have already had, for some time now, a raspberry pi hooked to my inverter monitoring and controlling various bits and bobs around the place... One of my greatest frustrations is the "lost solar" power that is often available during the average day.... This hot water system but one small addition I have made to try and utilize this unused power. I put in an order to a local (EL) company for a triple 220V geyser element. It wasn't as pricey as I expected. The 3 elements are 500W/750W/1000W respectively, all on a single screw in, standard fitting (with an extra long thermostat pocket as well, which reaches well beyond the ends of the elements.). The long and the short of it is, using my pi/mqtt/fabricobbled system, I can get a pretty close estimate of what inverter/solar power is available beyond the immediate consumption at any given point in time... Using a small "Sonoff" wifi switch, hot wired to a quad 10A relay board, a bit of Node-Red and some head scratching, the net result is, well fantastic! If there's 500W excess available, turn on the 500W element... Same for 750/1kw.... Need more? Turn them on in combination, to step in 8 steps, 0W to 2.25Kw as needed... The extra deep pocket for the thermostat got a Sonoff with a DS18B20 temp sensor to feed info back into the mqtt as well.... (Yep, you can series the elements as well with a bit more head scratching to lower the wattages still further, but lower than 500W is a waste of time as I have found out...) Safety? Sure... Using the existing Thermostat pocket in the geyser, there's a good old fashioned clicky-clicky rod slotted in... Hooked up to the common neutral of the 3 elements... If he's unhappily hot, everybody shuts down... And... It works... Well! Total cost of the additional bits was less than ZAR1K, its been running for about 6 months now and barring some really crappy weather, the household of 4 has used very little gas in the geyser system over the period... Cheerz... E
    7 points
  30. HubbleLithium

    Pylontech vs Hubble

    Hi Community, Seems the forum is decending into just degrading brands and negative commenting which is very unfortunate, as the powerforum is a great wealth of knowledge for power backup and solar enthusiasts. We're not dodging questions, we dont live on this forum, and we are not affiliated to powerforum. Seems if we dont answer questions immediately then there are negative views. We only check this forum once a week if that. If you have questions please contact us through our official channels or on our website contact form. For support and technical questions please contact us direct through our official channels, we will be more than happy to assist our clients.
    7 points
  31. Chris Hobson

    Software based SOC

    Ever since I discovered that the Axpert has worthless state of charge(SOC) readings I have felt that with a bit of lateral thinking one could develop a reasonably accurate SOC from the battery amp readings that are readily available from the inverter. After all it does have an internal shunt and so should be able to give us some sense of SOC. I have been playing with data from Emoncms and this is the result. I include the feed from the BMV and the inverter's own SOC calculation for comparison. I am pleased with the result. The first thing I did was convert my battery bank Ah value into Ampseconds. I did this for two reasons: The handling of the data after this conversion was relatively simple Converting the Amp feed into Ah resulted in small numbers which of had a recurring decimal number which the computer would truncate and introduce errors. So I have upgraded (not really) and have a 936000As battery bank. It looks impressive but it is not really. If anyone is prepared to send me the data from their inverter I would like to test my ideas on more data - preferably from one 100% SOC peak through one or two charge cycles until a 100% SOC is achieved again. I would need inverter battery amps and BMV SOC for this period.
    7 points
  32. Hi Dreaming about solar... not because of Escom, but because it's cool stuff. Never got so far to make the jump. The >100K always found another place where it was spend (sometimes on very big white elephants). Today, I made the dive and transferred the payment of my first solar system. (With luck on my side, I will be dead before the panels read their end of life) Sunsynk 8 6.4 BSL Bull JA Solar 405 Mono's and all the other related goodiest A very big thank you to the guys from Power Forum Store for the good prices, good courier costs and excellent service. I will start a post on my build so that other can see how a newbie tries to figure out all this nice goodies.
    7 points
  33. Sooo, I decided to get two more batteries and 8 more panels. Now I’m pretty much done spending money going down this rabbit hole... Anyway, I got the two additional batteries installed and managed to find a ventilation solution that’ll work while retaining the cupboard door. I’m just waiting for more panel hardware then I can get the additional panels installed on the roof. As I mentioned elsewhere, the battery stack is still running in backup mode (only charging/float mode, no discharging) in order for the packs to balance out with each other. After a day or so, all lights started flashing/displaying in sync. I’ll let it go for another day or so to make sure they settled nicely. In other news, I’ve been having a ball with getting the home integration going as well. Just basic for now, running Home Assistant, but I’ve got all the nice Sonoff light switches here, waiting for the electrician to pull in Neutrals to all the light switches in the house. In testing, I already have all outside lights, gates and garage door integrated. My wife thinks I’m a nerd...
    7 points
  34. Maybe the admins must put a pin/sticky somewhere...? The MO is generally the same. Batteries with 10 year warranties, at 50% discount as "end of year" (or "end of yeah" when they get sloppy with copy/paste), black friday, christmas, load shedding special, stock clearance sale. .... often with a nice big count down timer reminding you how close you are to losing out on the amazing special (or there are only 2 units left...). The scam likely has 2 components. Some people eventually get (clearly used/abused, identifying info removed, no manual etc.) batteries (? stolen cell tower leochs etc.?). The second component is probably letting people pay via EFT/cash deposit and just not supplying any goods. (gumtree/olx/facebook etc will have a number of these ads). They seem to do some homework and likely also take note of this particular forum since the newer site/s specifiy the "online only shop" part (too many people started asking about addresses and google street view?) so maybe the 50% discount will change to 45%....and the warehouse move to Askham... They also appear to have people posting positive reviews on hellopeter to counter negative comments. Many of the web addresses seem chosen to look like existing companies but with a strategic hyphen or variance of spelling that one will easily gloss over. Also they do not seem to bother to setup a mail account on the domain so fancy web domain only operates via gmail... From info in the public domain here is a sample with some unifying themes and some info that is useful to cross reference with google when the next add/site pops up.. solarenergyrsa.co.za/?product=12kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-last-chance-yeah-end-stock-clearance-sale-50-off +27 84-302-7691 +27-65-952-7634 +27 62-456-0626 Offices: East LondonDistribution warehouse: Johannesburg(Please Note that We are fully a Online Store) thewattsstore.co.za/product/12kwh-lithium-ion-package-discount-on-special-price-sale/ +27 62 456 0626 Beaconsfield Rd, Braelyn, East London, 5201Warehouses in Port Elizabeth, Cape Town, Durban & Johannesburg thesolarwarehouse.co.za/index.php/product/6-0kwh-tesvolt-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-with-8000-cycles-days-life-now-month-end-50-off-clearance-sale/ +27 67 791 9959 +27 67 809 0979 Shipments from JHB/CPT Warehouse li-iontech.co.za/index.php/product/12kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-last-year-stock-clearance-sale-50-off/ +27 64 489 1208 Head office: Moffett Retail Park, Port Elizabeth, RSA Distribution Warehouses: JHB & PE solarcityrsa.co.za/index.php/product/6kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-last-chance-holiday-stock-clearance-sale-50-off/ +27 65 346 6447 +27 64 489 1208 JHB Wearhouse address: Items are Drop-shipped from suppliers in JHB, CPT & Germiston RSA thesolar-shop.co.za/index.php/product-category/lithium-ion-battery/ +27-65 952 7634 +27 68 011 2309 +27 61 363 4125 +27 79 763 3694 gooffthegrid.co.za +27 65 346 6447 +27 68 233 2924 +27 83 998 1589 Shipments from JHB/CPT sethsolar.co.za +27 83 854 5027 Wearhouse Address: Port Elizerberth thesolar-experts.co.za +27 64 489 1208 Head Office: Moffett Retail Park. Warehouse in JHB & PE solarstorage-experts.co.za/index.php/product/today-only-get-a-24kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warrant +27 64 489 1208 solarguru-rsa.co.za +27 83 854 5027 solarmarket.co.za
    7 points
  35. Good afternoon Tsa As per SANS 10142:2006 the maximum allowable current for PVC insulated cables in a single phase installation when the cable is enclosed in conduit fixed to a wall or trunking fixed to a wall are as follows. For Multi-Phase the currents are lower. For GP cable - That is the individual Black, Red, Blue, White, Yellow, Yellow and Green cables which are not bundled together with a second insulation over the individual cores and with 1 solid core or multiple thick strands 1.5 mm2: 17.5A, 2.5 mm2: 24A, 4.0 mm2: 32A, 6.0 mm2: 41A, 10.0 mm2: 57A, 16.0 mm2: 76A, 25.0 mm2: 101A For Surfix and Twin and Earth - A cable with more than 1 cores with 1 solid core or multiple thick strands individually insulated with a second insulation over the individual cores 1.5 mm2: 16.5A, 2.5 mm2: 23A, 4.0 mm2: 30A, 6.0 mm2: 38A, 10.0 mm2: 52A, 16.0 mm2: 69A, 25.0 mm2: 90A The maximum cable operating temperature are not allowed to exceed 70 degree Celsius, if the temperature exceeds 70 degree Celsius a thicker cable must be used. Cabtyre -A flexible cable with thin strands used for appliances, power tools, extension leads etc are not allowed in a DB. The gap between the clamp of the MCB and the start of the insulation may not exceed 2mm. There is also a limit of the number of cables entering or leaving an MCB and that limit is 3. Another point that is misunderstood is that the MCB protects the cable and not the load supplied by the cable. If a cable leaving the DB is joined and the cable that is joined is thicker or thinner than the other cable then the MCB must be rated for the thinner cable, for example a gate motor is to be installed and the cable leaving the house is 2.5 mm2 but you cannot get a 2.5 mm2 cable only 1.5 mm2 is available then the MCB must be rated for the 1.5mm2 cable. Circuits are not allowed to be mixed on the MCB's eg Lights and Socket outlets on the same MCB. Open spaces in the cover of the DB must be closed off so that you are protected from a electric shock and to keep insects, bugs, spiders, bees and wasps out of the DB. MCB's must be marked with indelible ink or a proper label which is not easily removed. If a DB is supplied by another DB then the sub DB and the supplying DB must be properly marked the same way MCB's are marked. A Switch Dis-connector (isolator) must disconnect both L & N for single phase installations and all P's & N for multi-phase installations. A 2 pole or 4 pole MCB are not allowed to be used as a switch dis-connector (isolator). A MCB must trip all P's for multi-phase installations if there is a over current in any of the phases. An Earth leakage must disconnect both L & N for single phase installations and all P's & N for multi-phase installations PS CB is short for Miniature Circuit Breaker.
    7 points
  36. Hi all, Thanks to so much good information on this forum, a lot of thinking, planning and building, I finally came online on Saturday. So far everything works pretty well. Eskom mains was turned off on Sunday and so far, no need even to run the generator. I am still finding my feet with all the settings and discovery of the best options but My system: 24 X JAR 375 W Mono's (8.8kWp) 3 X Axpert Type 4kW inverters in parallel (12kW) 7 X Narada NPFC100 Li-Fe-Po4 batteries (33.6kWh) 1 X Deutsz 15kVA generator Pic attached.
    7 points
  37. External grid : Eskom (old Rotating meter store exess power in grid, to avoid cycling batteries at night) Hybrid inverters: 2 X Victron Multiplu 48Volt/5000VA/70Amp, (master slave parallel operation give 10000VA), Victrons Include multistage chargers limited to 60A+60A=120A Battery charging current. Internal Grid: 2 X Eltek THEIA HE-t 4.4 grid-tie inverters providing power directly to load at 97% effeciency. excess is routed back to grid or batteries by victrons. The Victrons also Throttle excess power on Eltek's through frequency shifting when eskom down. Batteries : 24 X 2V @ 500A Lead Crystal Batteries CNF J-500, providing 48V @ 500A 20 X 305 W Monocrytaline panels , arranges in 2 strings of 10 panels at 360V feeding into the two Eltek inverters respectivly A BMV-600S battery monitor tells, what coming and going. Effergy engage, cloud based power monitor keeps track of usage.
    7 points
  38. Jaco De Jongh

    Power outages

    For most of the active guys here the lights dont go out anymore..
    7 points
  39. Hi ! I wanted to show you and contribute the schematic that shows what I'm finishing in my home and that shows the use of the BMV702 relay. I am doing in my house an exclusive circuit for high consumptions that groups appliances: Air conditioning, washing machine, dry clothes and various other items that can be connected in the kitchen such as microwave oven, toaster, blender, etc. The idea is that when the Main electrical grid is running, there is energy in both the exclusive high consumption circuit and in the rest of the home, since if PV Energy (not shown in the diagram) is not enough, the rest Of power is provided by the grid In case of a cut in the main power supply, Contactor 1 is responsible for: 1. Operate the alarm (buzzer + flashing light): This alerts my family and tells them that the house starts to operate only with solar power (if available) and battery power (with a switch this alarm can be turned off). 2. Make a cut of all appliances connected to the high consumption circuit. Contactor 2 has the function to protect the batteries from a dangerous discharge Since the BMV is configured with Inverted Relay, this is Normal Closed, parameter 16 is set to keep the relay in its state until the SOC drops below the 55% value. When this occurs the contactor is opened and the loads are disconnected.
    7 points
  40. Keep in mind that was done by me and I tried to be as impartial as possible. I asked @Chris Hobson just to verify that what I wrote was what I meant (Thanks Chris for the help) Also it should be noted that @The Terrible Triplett arranged through Victron SA for the SCC and we should give that man a Bells for his bravesness. Lastly the guys from SP Powerunits who was kind enough to give the SCC for testing. If you are in the Pretoria area it will be well worth your time to go by them. In the short time that I spoke with them I realised that there is still a massive amount if info that I don't know and I could have saved a fair amount of money have I took the time to chat to them beforehand. As for the report here is what I came up with: The System: My current setup consists of the following: · 12 x 260 w solar panels set in 3 panels per array · 8 x 6-GFM-170F batteries · Victron BMV 702 Battery Monitor · 1 Axpert 5000 VA – Firmware 72.80 Loaded · Victron 150/35 SCC (Test Unit) First Method: I have been testing the two SCC’s over a period days alternating between them to see how they perform under my day to day conditions. Now the consumption on a day to day basis does not stay consistent as this is a running household, but it does give you a reasonable idea as to the performance of the different SCCs. First is the Axpert on a normal day starting from a 89 % SOC By the end of the day the the battery monitor showed that the batteries was charged to 99 % and overall there was no real problems that I could see. Second was the Victron SCC also starting on 89 % SOC By the end of the day the the battery monitor showed again that the batteries was charged to 99 % and overall there was no apparent difference that I could see bet tween the two days. Second Method: I then decided to put the two SCCs next to each other and see how they would perform in exactly the same conditions. This meant that I would need to split the system in half having 6 panels on each SCC, and 4 batteries that was discharged to the same level. As my batteries do not get discharged very low at night I also decided to push them lower than what they have ever been discharged in order to give the SCC enough time charge. The batteries were discharged overnight to 70 % SOC and then the whole system was switched off, split and wired to the two SCC. As I only have one BMV I decided that I would not use it for any comparisons as it would only be able to measure the Axpert’s output. Both the Axpert and the Victron do report battery Volts solar Amps and solar Watts and these readings were compared. (As a side note when I tested the Victron SCC I did notice that there was a slight difference between the Victron SCC battery volt reading and that of the BMV so there would be some deviation between the two SCC’s , the Axpert’s readings were very close to the BMV) EmonCMS was used to log the data from the two SCC and there was no other load on the Axpert. First graph is the Panels watts outputs from the two SCC. Panel amp output Battery Volts Linear comparison between the Watt output of the two SCC’s Personal Notes on the tests : Apart from the one battery bank that took a bit more charge than the other I could not see any real apparent difference between the two SCC’s outputs. It was also noted that the Axpert’s data is not as refined as the Victron’s. The step pattern of the Axpert’s Amp feed indicates reporting of Amps in whole numbers oppose to Victron more accurate readings in decimals. There was also a small variation in voltage reported by the Axpert and this can either be ascribed to again the coarser scale of its voltage readings or an inability to perfectly maintain absorb or float. Since there is a small amount of variation in the Victron voltage feed and the Axpert Voltage line is nearly linear I suspect that the case is the former and the scale is too coarse to truly record the voltage. Occasionally it is rounded up or down resulting in peaks and troughs. In my opinion there is no real difference between the two SCC’s outputs as the data confirms it. Some Extra notes: Now there could be a host of other tests that one could do to compare the two SCC’s, but I attempted to run them in normal and side by side tests. The only thing that I would like to see is how they would compare under a cloudy day where the SCC would need to adjust as clouds passes over the system but then I would need to run the system in parallel over a time or hope that you time the weather perfectly and then split the system again. As this is a running household and not a test bench site it would be impractical to do so. One last comment, when you handle the Victron SCC you do feel that there is a big difference between the two units. The Victron feels solid and well built and I would say the Victron would be able to handle a lot more hammering than would the Axpert but considering the price tag I am not prepared to push either one of them but my money would definitely be on the Victron to be on top of that one . The Victron gives you a host of options so that you could configure your system to be as automated as possible but it comes at a price. The Axpert is more of an off grid “Inverter/UPS with a SCC” that does not give you many options so you would need to build your own setup to make it work fairly well within a grid system. In my case I have a remote triggered switch on the Axpert that will switch to grid under certain conditions and the family needs to be constantly aware as to what the system is currently doing before something is switched on or off. Where as if you have a Victron you could setup it up as a grid tie and then there would be no need for checking the system all the time. Also to consider is the future value of your property. If you have an Axpert, you have had to grow with the system and learnt as you went on. In my case I had to setup up all sorts of things to make the system work. Now if I would like to sell the system with the property will I be able to get a buyer that will be able to understand the system and will he be able to get every thing going again if the R-Pi were to fall over? If not the system would become a liability and not an asset. All in all money talks and the Axpert gives real good value for money as long as you know what you get and you are happy to live with it else consider saving a bit longer get your baseload lower and maybe consider getting a smaller Victron system. Best Regards Paul
    7 points
  41. Chris-R

    Imeon 9.12

    Hi Guys, I have just completed the installation and just can't believe its done! Unfortunately it is already dark and I will thus only be able to switch on tomorrow morning. I can't wait and just had to share this with all you wonderful oaks out there. I have attached a few pictures to give you an idea of what I have done with the installation. I also have to thank everyone on the forum for all your assistance and support, all the good advice and just for being available at all times!!!! Without the forum I really don't think I would have been able to do it alone! THANKS GUYS !!!!!!!!
    7 points
  42. Mike

    Cost of 3kw installation

    From my side my rate used to be in the early days R350 per hour, but when you have to start running around collecting goods for clients and so on, it starts to cost you. my Vito does on average 8 to 12000km's per month as we work in a 150km radius from the office. We upped our hourly call out rate to R385 per hour and had no complaints SO our complete installs cost anything from R8k to R14k and even up to R45k and higher dependent on the size of installation and the difficulty to install - i believe it to be fair, as folks above mention you have to supply all to site etc. We also nowadays, if we supply everything charge around 10% markup, as i have always believed that our money making would be on the labour side of things as that is our field of experience What get me going sometimes is when a client purchases everything and asks you to install for R350 per hour, and it would take us maybe 4 hours.... sorry i run for the hills then. One also has to remember that the install is our responsibility for the next 12 months Also at most installs you always will find some or other issue with cabling / DB etc and we sort it at no charge before we sign off.
    7 points
  43. OomD

    SuperPV...

    Mockups of what will be on the main screen. Screen 1 Battery SOC (State Of Charge, %), Volts, Amps, Units in(Kwh), Units out(Kwh), Run time, estimated remaining time, Load (Kw) Solar panels Volts, Amps, Units in(Kwh), Load (Kw) Grid Volts, Units in(Kwh) House Load (Kw), Units used(Kwh) Screen 2 Total volts, State Of Charge, Temperature Inidividual battery voltages Individual battery State Of Charge Individual battery temperatures
    7 points
  44. Weasel

    Multiplug

    This isn't really a complete test, its just so i can make up my mind... which i cant. Janma summarized it quite nicely and ill add to the list: Positives: They are compact so it causes less clutter They are less likely to split open when pulled out of the socket and easier to grip The sockets are compatible with the 2 point plugs The holes in the socket is smaller so less likely for a small child to get their fingers into it. Very easy to wire, i mean really easy. It separates into 3 pieces and you can do the connection neatly then put it back together. you can flip the insert, so you can choose which way the cable goes. Negatives: Small contact area, 16A current rating is questionable Has some wiggle room, its better than a 2 point but its not solved. Poor quality plugs are going to suffer. Little room for cable inside, especially something rated at the plugs capacity, im thinking you will struggle badly to get a thick 3 core cabtyre in there. Insert is likely to pinch wires if you don't take care. Strain relief is poor, it works but again thicker gauge wires is an issue. it clicks into the casing and i think its going to break or just be left out by many people. also it pinches a bit because its so thin. screw hole pillar could pinch wires if you're not careful and it would have been nice to see a threaded insert as there is only one screw to it. Lastly, and to me probably the biggest failure is the small press fit cap to cover the screw on the side. To start: Its so tight i have to damage it to get it off, then as time goes by these will start to fall out, either dropping the plug too many times or quality of the plugs deteriorate. now maybe its swallowed by a kid, or worse the screw is through a carrying wire, yes its entirely possible here and easy. now you have mains exposed a few millimeters from your hand. kids could poke at mains with any small object. the cap should have been a plastic screw in cap! On to a little load test. i connected a heater and tumble dryer through one and through the multiplug drawing a little more than 16A for about 30 MIns. plugged out and took the pics Plug while in The Plug The socket the wall plug carrying the same current the wall Socket carrying the same current So for high current id still use the old plug, In a sense i really like these plugs and i want to use them because of space saving. I wouldn't go over about 8 A on them though, they handle 16 fine, granted a little hotter but i'm convinced in a while there will be cheaper crap everywhere and then it will be a different story. I think ill also glue in that screw cap after its been wired. but yea, not sure...... its not a safer plug than the old one imo, but that too had its issues. Oh and thanks very much Clint for recommending these Multi-plugs, they are no question better than most out there and at a very very decent price. Ill be replacing at least 4 of mine with these.
    7 points
  45. I have been building a hot water circulation system onto my generators cooling system to circulate the hot cooling water through radiators in the house for winter heating. On cold cloudy days I run the generator for power, and a by product of the power is 150l of hot water in the coolant tank. Apparently for an engine about 1/3 goes to power generation, 1/3 goes to heating coolant and 1/3 goes out of the exhaust as heat. I am using a fridge thermostat to control the system which drives a geyser circulation pump. Once the coolant temp reaches 45 degrees, the pump switches on and runs until the water drops below 35 degrees. Yesterday I ran the generator for 3 hours, the coolant reached a maximum temp of 63 degrees and the hot water circulated in the radiators for another 3 hours after the generator was switched off. The generator produces about 2Kw at the inverter, so maybe 3kW at the crank so the engine was producing 9kWh over the period. 150l of water raised by about 40 degrees gives about 7kWh of water heating (1.16wh to heat one liter of water by one degree centigrade). So I have therefore almost doubled the energy efficiency by capturing the waste heat. The next step I suppose would be to try and capture some of the exhaust heat. New radiators cost at least R7k each, and I couldn't find any second hand ones, so I built them out of copper pipe. The first is a bit of a sculpture, using the form of a labyrinth, and the second a bit more conventional. I still need to finish the building and then apply some brasso, but you get the idea.
    7 points
  46. KLEVA

    A Thank You - Thread

    Guys (and maybe a girl or two), I need to say thank you to this forum and it's members... You have no idea how much I have learned in the last few weeks about solar that I wouldn't have found anywhere else, and I really appreciate your efforts and willingness to give out your hard earned (sometimes expensive) lessons to others. I don't normally participate in forums, other than a guest or background watcher, but you have made this fun and informative, and are saving a lot of people money. No matter the choice of kit, I have never watched/participated in another forum where this much information and knowledge is shared so freely, and "almost" without "mine is better than yours" attitude (there are a few side remarks, but they are in jest). I genuinely wish I had joined this forum before my install, there is an amazing amount to learn. Then the willingness of other members of this forum to give up their time (and a bit of kit), has also astounded me. It is not "normal" chat room/forum behaviour! And for that I thank you again. I am extremely thankful that I joined you, and hope that I can impart the knowledge that I have as well as you all have. So a general thank you again to all members/participants - I wish i had some of the Admins dosh to dish out to some members (even the quiet ones) who have gone an extra mile to help out someone that they don't know. Although all have been helpful, I need to mention at least one or 2: @Energy - This forum is brilliant and your willingness to listen to suggestions to improve is awesome @Camel - Seriously, this guy went out of his way (completely) to assist in sourcing equipment, and spending his own time, helping a fellow forum member @jdp, @Coulomb - And many others (just forgot all the nicknames for now) - Software tips/tricks. I couldn't have gotten anywhere without your shared knowledge and input to this forum. PS: With the amount of knowledge that guys like Coulomb have shared (in a forum that isn't even in his home country), I have to wonder if he has a day job! Where do people like that find the time? In general to all the software guys - Your friendliness and information sharing is awesome, and I hope you keep it up. We all spend many hours banging away at a keyboard to get something simple working, and give up that time by offering that knowledge gained, free of charge, to others. So just wanted to let you know that even the "Lurkers" appreciate it. Cheers all, have a great weekend... I have a Victron 702, fuses and breaker to install this weekend thanks to @Camel
    7 points
  47. 7 points
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