Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 20/09/2021 in all areas

  1. When I bought my system I did a calculation on a little piece of paper and figured a 7 year payback (given annual escalations > 10% by Eskom). That was the cost of the system against what I wasn't going to run up on the meter. I know longer think that will happen (for one, stupid me didn't factor in overcast days), at the very best I will break even just in time to splash out on new batteries. However, this doesn't mean my wife is unhappy. Firstly the savings increases year on year as the tariffs increase. Secondly, since installation we have always had power, the lights have always been on, the fridges and the deep freezers stay on and so we don't lost contents (and I can always get a cold beer), we never miss Strictly Come Dancing. These are things that we can't attach a rands and cents value to and so set off against the purchase price of the system, but they surely are worth something. So I think in pure rands and cents terms - where the only saving you can measure is on your meter - it's difficult to balance the books, but there's the advantages that I've described above, and if reducing your carbon footprint is worth something to you then there's another thing that is worth something.
    5 points
  2. 0012

    Introduction

    The SolarEdge is a nice piece of kit but too sophisticated for Zim, the power quality thresholds are too tight and so it's the first to cut out and the last to start generating. Of the two inverters we put in, one had to be replaced after a year, under warranty. Of the 110 optimisers, about 6 have failed since install 3.5yr ago. ABB - a nice machine, a bit of a mission to commission but no issues with it since up and running. Looks like it has the lowest efficiency of the bunch but probably by less than 1%. Delta - sounds like a helicopter with those fans, but a good machine. Schneider - I think this is just a rebranded sungrow. Our pick of the bunch, nice piece of kit, this and the delta have the best kWh/kWp production, best conversion efficiency. Very robust and can handle wide grid power quality parameters.
    4 points
  3. Actually, on reading the documentation again, I no longer hold this theory. With the solar balance setting off, the PV output current should be limited to the value of the total charge current setting. Suppose that's 60 A; that means that you should be able to use up to 60 A of PV charge current (at the 50 V end, so around 3 kW) to support the loads. That's clearly not happening. What I now suspect is happening is what @hoohloc reported; the BMS is sending a "don't charge, don't discharge" command to the BMS, and it's obeying it. Mu suspicion is that the Pylontech BMS is using too high a maximum charge voltage, and that's allowing the battery voltage to exceed 54.0 V, which is the panic level. But I don't understand how the battery voltage is supposed to fall if it's not being discharged. In summary: it looks like the BMS is the root cause. Whether the inverter firmware should be slavishly following the BMS commands is another question.
    3 points
  4. That argument is irrelevant for majority of the use cases in this country. Isolated installs for backup purposes with zero export in to the grid, actually with zero export capability at all, really shouldn't warrant arbitrary folks knocking on your door to make more money from taxpayers trying to save a dime and only compensating for already present inadequacy in government.
    3 points
  5. I think most people work out the payback wrong. Panels: These babies generate power. So they can pay themselves back. Batteries: These do not generate power without putting power into them first. So how can they pay themselves back? They really can't but they can increase the power generated by your panels. Inverter: Required but again doesn't generate or store power, just switches between power sources. So for me, the panel will pay themselves off fast. The inverter+batteries is for convenience, or as you say, the advantages you described. Panels are to pay themselves back. Batteries and inverter is there for my convenience to enjoy life as I should have before Eskom started their interuptions.
    3 points
  6. It is a very expensive hobby, ill tell you that. If your goal is to make the system work for you (not the other way around) then I like to think of it as a long term investment into your comfort and self sufficiency in the future. Have a chat around the forums to learn about components people like... dislike etc... and be warned, your (Wife/husband/partner) will not be impressed with your account balance Huge fan of the Pylon batteries(Owner of 3 US-3000C's ), cant speak for those inverters, know nothing about them,
    3 points
  7. My heat pump is a few years old. At the time I had it installed I wanted a solar geyser (I'd had one at my previous property) but there was no way to position the tubes so that they would face north (according to salesperson. At my previous place of abode they'd built a framework and mounted geyser and tubes on that, he told me that's not allowed in Jo'burg anymore). This then led to "ok, how much is it going to cost?" The answer was that there was not much in it in terms of putting a solar geyser on the roof or hooking up a heat pump to my existing geyser. To be clear, this is a heat pump to heat a 200l geyser, not to warm up a swimming pool a bit. OK... so maybe solar geysers got cheaper in the meantime, or you are proposing just tubes on a roof feeding an existing geyser. I think it's important to understand what varieties of fruit we are comparing. What you say about relative efficiency makes sense to me. What I don't get with the heat pump is loss of water due to the water getting too hot and a pressure relief valve sometimes having to pop and send lots of scalding hot water down the roof and into the gutters. What makes the heat pump work for me, I think, is the improvement in efficiency V a common or standard geyser (which, in turn, means I can run it early AM off my batteries), and that I can use the timer to just run it at certain times of day which suit our lifestyle. RE Cost. Yes... the heat pump is more expensive than a regular geyser (or even a geyserwise as far as I can tell). It's like so many of these things - you have to play the long game and bet that over 7, 8, 9, 10 cars you will make the money back and then start saving.
    3 points
  8. 0012

    Introduction

    The installation is planned for Monday. Parts are going together, leaving space for the future MPPTs...
    3 points
  9. This is definitely not true. A normal timer does not control geyser temperature like you can with geyserwise. The trick is to set up the temps and time it comes on according to how many people need to shower . Follow the usage of water/temps for a while and set the controller parameters accordingly. I have saved atleast 30% on my usage after installing a geyserwise. I was using a normal timer before and its a huge difference.
    3 points
  10. Power suppliers (Eskom or municipalities) have a legitimate interest in what is connected to the grid, so in principle I don't mind them have mechanisms in place to find out who has something connected to the grid and whether or not it's properly connected. I know of people who have built their own solar systems. It's easy and cheap! That's what the tell you. It might be dangerous to them - which is one thing - but it might also be dangerous to a sparkie who believes the juice to be off. Same as people with generators. Sure they should be allowed to run a genny, but they shouldn't be allowed to connect it to their house any old how they please. There has to be some regulations (for the safety of the grid and of people) and some enforcement of those regulations. But that's what it should be about: good operation of the infrastructure and protecting the public.
    2 points
  11. This project is finally finished. I had an inspection done and received the CoC today. Apart from two additional warning labels, there was not a single compliance issue found with my installation, which I'm quite chuffed about. As a side note, I resolved the nuisance tripping of the essential db EL by swapping the crappy ACDC branded EL with a Schneider EL. I hope to add solar panels in future, but being in Cape Town, I will probably have to swap the inverter too as InfiniSolar is no longer on the approved list (it was in 2019). Edit: typo
    2 points
  12. Shoot the drones down, this is and invasion of privacy.
    2 points
  13. TimCam

    My Standby Power System

    Once you're complete with your install, Eskom won't load-shed for months to come.
    2 points
  14. I watched one of the Synsynk You Tube videos recently. I think the max PV input was 10,000W, want to aim for 450V or lower and the max amperage was around 18A. It's got two sting inputs. Why not go for smaller sub 500W panels & not fly so close to the sun? Careful, Icarus...
    2 points
  15. 0012

    Introduction

    Checking in... I work in the renewable energy field, mostly mini-hydro (1-20MW) with a touch of solar on the side... Currently getting ready to install a home solar at my place, 10kVA victron quattro, cerbo GX, 4x pylontech US3000 operating as a UPS at first then adding PV modules and MPPT in about 6 months' time when my pocket has recovered!
    2 points
  16. That was from https://www.sestore.co.za/ https://www.livecopper.co.za/ https://www.em.co.za/ All of this was online, simply because it seems that every retail shop has got some sales people with an attitude problem. Then there is the issue of stock and then one of quality, don't get me started here. If you are looking for a specific product, and the sales person are too lazy ignorant arrogant or have some moronic comment, and they say it does not exist when I have the product code in my hand, they never see me again. Normally ordering online, is cheaper and delivered faster with almost always a return policy, so win win for me.
    2 points
  17. Let me explain to you that I understand that a heat pump is "better" than geyser and let me take on the battery systems as well. Something you have to understand I agree there is a place for heat pumps and there is a place for batteries I am not arguing that. What I am saying not in my home I do not like expensive white elephants that keeps on demanding attention. A frien of mine installed a power wall and all. Over the R200K and they all ready have fancy battery issues.... These systems ask more money and attention than "skelmpie.". The cost of a heat pump: R 15 000 AND HOW LONG DES IT LAST and what is the cost to fix it? In my case my electricity bill was more than R3K not sure how much it will be today and my water bill was > R 2000. Today my water is 0 and my electricity is < R 0.00 That is a tax free savings of more than R5500 per month. Some facts: My computer is on 24/7 I have a 60 000l koi pond/reservoir I have +/- 17 000l swimming pool. 4 fridges 3 large size TV's A geyser and ... In this winter I was building stuff and used only +/- 50% of my solar system . Let me also mention this that for all practical purposes its two families and the most my electricity was R884 for July. Two families each pays R440 if you wish. And I give my neighbor free water. All from my solar system You must understand I do not do this "digging" I will die of boredom. So I dig and scratch my hobby is my work and my work is my hobby. So I play. I listen what people say do a test bed and then see what is the most "COST EFFECTIVE" solution. Therefor my statement if you can afford R 100 000 for batteries then obviously don't listen to me. The question is how many live in A > R 6M house and wants to save on a few Rand's of electricity. Some one very dear and close to me install one of these fancy products and by luck his geyser was set correctly and there was no change. This person listen to a salesman and at the end there was no savings. Trust me it was far more than R1000 the cost. Therefore my main aim for these debates are to show people you can start small expand and then start using the councils money to build your system. You do not have to spend R 40 000 to start saving. Therefore it would be far better for a person to install a solar geyser with some sort of collector than to buy a heat pump at a huge cost. The reality is for +/- R 2000 and a bit of labor you can convert your own geyser and have an immediate impact. Or even better take the R 900 as payment towards a gas hob and immediate you will see the difference. Telling people you need R 50 K batteries, R 30 K heat pump and then R15 K fancy electronics to sound and look smart put it out of reach of +/- 90% in SA. But a gas hob of R 2000 is in reach and its an immediate saving. That is then the first brick of the power saving lego blocks. The next is to do the geyser and will cost +/- R3000 and all of a sudden for R5000 and no fancy electronics the savings are noticeable. I saw a advert on gumtree for R1000 as the person wanted to upgrade. It is a vacuum tube system ... It is this what I thought this article is about. Not to spend money that a lot of people can never reach. But once you spend it on the right stuff then for sure in 4/5 years you will be able to afford batteries and what ever and then you get either the council or the sun to pay. I am sure that this person who asked the question is looking at a better priced system or solutions rather than spending R150K on equipment that you will never have a ROI with an account of R 1500. Therefore my "aggression" towards fancy electronics and gimmicks that makes sale people look smart. Remember I live and eat electronics so I am not anti that stuff. We should be realistic and help people to start get out of the grip of those that steel from us and that is my aim. Do I have anything against a heat pump no. I just can't see how on earth am I going to get R20K back in 3 years on R 1500 electricity account. I assure you this person if he installs a gas hob he will immediately see the difference then he will be exited for the next step and then before long he will have his own solar and ... Once people realize you can by a starter and expand more will go this way. But how on earth do you tell some one start by spending R20K on a heat pump, R 50K on batteries and you have not saved a single penny? There is absolutely no logic in it. Does this mean I am anti some of these devices no not at all. Therefore what I am trying to achieve is to have a path from where a person can see the end goal and achieve step by step success with out hurting monthly expenses. PLEASE I DO NOT THINK YOU CAN'T AFFORD FANCY STUFF. I am only trying to lay out a basic plan from where the most money get wasted and then you can build on with other blocks and pieces and listen to those and then waste money on geyser wize, batteries and heat pumps. But first get the basics in place that you waste council money and not your own. Yes batteries has it place, heat pumps to but only for those who can afford it and who wants to waste their hard earned money.
    2 points
  18. Back to the partial commissioning, and no smoke escaped and nothing tripped on the DBs. But alas, the Quattro inverter kept tripping as soon as the BYD battery bank reached 100% SoC. One of two alarms, battery voltage exceeded or the other one was on the Fronius. Then both inverters would trip. So the software updates started. One item I postponed the configuration of was the ESS install. After software updates were mostly all done, we switched on again with no Utility grid input and no Fronius string inverter, only the MPPT charge controller. So I let the MPPT charge the battery bank to 100% with no issues. As expected, the ESS or rather lack thereof, was the issue. But it was getting dark and we were tired, so next day tasks were left. First time switched on, no Fronius Feeding the beast DC, Battery banks x 3 feeds to busbars done Starting to wire Quattro DC from busbars DC done Mostly wrapped up, I am happy
    2 points
  19. Roughly calculated 600 X R2.72 = R1632. Important geyser wise is a fancy timer does not truly save electricity. One can achieve the same with a R350 timer ... Thus: The very first step is to install a gas hob. Oven is not that important as from an hour you might use 35/45 power Gas will cost +/- R100 per month electricity much more. For geyser you might want to add another collector/tank but that one can only see with more information. Make sure all you lights are LED/ low power. Plan your meals a head microwave take a lot of power. Not exact science but a microwave of 1.5Kw uses +/- 1unit per hour. Do a defrost and check it on your meter. They DO not SAVE electricity. If your power is still high use gas kettle These steps should drop the KWHr below 600 units as a step. If you are on prepaid do supply me with 1 weeks meter readings please or your electricity bill you can in box me with it. Below is my solar graph: The green line is what I put back into the grid during the day. In Cape Town we had a lot of rain this year and still it was worth it. The red line is what costly. You never mentioned you want to fight outages. Therefore if it was me I would 1st do the above. Once the above is done I would install a grid tie invert.. Depending the way your house faces and other stuff will depend the amount of solar panels. If you install a5Kw grid tie you will see that your account will drop to less than R300 per month. These figures are values based on those who I helped and not exact. One can only do more accurate calculations once one understands: What other equipment uses electricity pool? Grinding normally take more power than welding Fridges use +/- 300W when on depending on the size or .7 units per hour. Take the meter reading when it gets dark and then again when the sun is up then again when the sun sets. Take it for 1 week if possible. Then one can calculate your night usage and recommend a size of solar panels.. Mine is +/- 10 units per night or R600 per month. During the day if I push back 20 units more than my days usage I get a 0 balance. I tested a gas geyser yes it saves but it has its issues. If your geyser is totally off during the day and fully heated by the son then you can increase the size and have more water..... There are many options. The most important is to get rid of the hob that eats power. When you do take the readings on the meter take it at +/- the same time egg 7 at night and 9 in the morning. Hope this help you it a fairly accurate guesstimate. If you can provide those figures then I can assist more.
    2 points
  20. @curto, , I get your point . But you insist on a design philosophy that Python programmers and yours fans can see very well, but I am from another era and my philosophy is different. If I am going to make a program just for me, obviously I would do it in the simplest way that is the solution you propose and what I did in the first version: static address and immediate connection, expanding that simple concept in addition to knowing all the IP addresses to decide which one to connect with. But my intention is to share what I do with anyone who thinks they like and serve them like me, even if they don't have much notion of what a static or dynamic IP is delivered by a DHCP from a router, simply because an installer didn't just install your entire solar system and left your equipment set up on your LAN and you haven't taken any computer science courses, you don't understand or care. I do not live from programming, it is my hobby and in that line I look for 4 objectives: 1.) That the system provide me information in real time with the lowest refresh rate (polling rate) that Goodwe's hardware inverter technology allows, in this case, so that the energy sum equations have the highest possible precision and having the data available to be able to use the full power of a PC to add many more functionalities. 2.) Use a platform that allows me to save my data locally, not depend on the web cloud and is reasonably protected against read / write failures. 3.) That it is as visually attractive as possible within my own limitations of graphic design concepts, having a Micro PC and a Monitor next to the Inverter and that my whole family understand what is happening and show it to my friends and people who want to get into Solar Energy, without being so aware of the additional consumption of 10 Wh more, since for an industrial micro PC it is not much greater than a Blackberry PHI 4. 4.) That it is intuitive, easy to use and therefore does not require more than a minimum of knowledge to install the program as anyone does and that it works for anyone, such as PVMaster / EzManager. His intervention was useful when he told me that he has 3 (three) inverters connected to his LAN and that the PVMaster makes a kind of internal list for 10 seconds. I did not know that. To avoid what the PVMaster does wrong, we just need to improve the search algorithm. When I have time I will continue with this topic to automate the discovery of all Goodwe inverters automatically. Regards.
    2 points
  21. Hi Please excuse my terminology as I'm am not in the industry. I am paying close to R2000 a month on electricity in winter and R1500 in summer. Currently I have a 150l Kwikhot geyser + Geyserwise + Flat plate collector/solar panel. I am staying in a 3-bedroom house, just me and the wife but the might be a baby on the way soon and I am also looking at building or buying a bigger place where my parents can come and stay with us, two or three years from now. Not sure if it will be in the house or in a garden flat yet. We both take a 5 to 8 minute shower in the evening and a slightly shorter one in the morning to wake us up before the caffeine has fully kicked in. I've done some minor research and it appears to me that a gas geyser might be the best option for heating water especially with current electricity tariffs. I'm paying between R2.72/kWh and R3.14/kWh at the moment in my area depending on monthly consumption. Has anyone done a ROI or savings calculation on the below to options assuming it is a newbuild and everything would have to done from scratch or is there any existing posts or articles on this that anyone can recommend. I am also considering installing gas geyser on current house for nest 2 to 3 years if the ROI justifies it. Electric Geyser VS Gas Geyser VS Electric Geyser + Gesyerwise + Flat plate collector VS Gas Geyser + Flat plate Collector, where the gas only needs heats up the shortfall to +-50 deg C Thanks
    1 point
  22. There is something else to consider as well, you might find a great BMS for your setup and order from China. Wait 3 or more months to arrive and get everything working. But if the BMS fails down the line after few months or a year - then what? Your whole system will be down for several months, while waiting for another shipment from China. Not having good options available locally is really a big issue.
    1 point
  23. He already has a video out about the use of an active balancer & the results are really positive. In my opinion having goofed around long enough with this type of kit, an active balancer or Smart active balancer as Andy has reviewed is a very necessary piece of kit used in conjunction together. But it's horses for courses here. Each needs to do what they need to do. But the Smart Daly for a paralleled setup is a failure. In other words, you can parallel 2 cells together to make a big cell, then add the smart Daly in this arrangement. However, you cannot add 2 Smart Daly's running two individual 51.2V battery packs together. Been there done that, it is just dangerous. QUCC has sent me a 500A 16s version to play with & I am awaiting the pigeon to arrive. Yes they can be Paralleled with out issues. So this means you start with a BMS that can expand your capacity from the beginning. Will definitely post feedback when it arrives. They have also been very kind enough to provide the Comms protocols also. Let me also just advocate, that I believe that the Smart Daly is not a bad BMS & for a single battery pack arrangement works pretty well. The passive balancing is however, a pipe dream. I have now added Active balancers in all the packs I have build & zero issues to date. However, without the active balancer the BMS just does not balance enough even top balanced cells. But as a good gate keeper it does what it needs to do. 87
    1 point
  24. A very nice question that came from this discussion is how effective is a solar collector and the ROI of it. I have the following array of vacuum gas tubes. +/- 98% during this cold and rainy ( 1 in more than 10years) winter we had our hot water generated during the day was more than 80C. There are 11 x 1meter tubes: So I got a new circulation pump: I will now interconnect it with a 200l geyser no element and monitor the temp during the day. A small micro computer will control it. I will remove the old style bi metal temp controller and move a stainless temp sensor that will control the temp. I will also install a T valve : From this I will see the efficiency and potential of the vacuum tubes as well as do a "smarter" "geyserwize" implementation that will do the control. I am pretty sure that I will get 300l water @ 85C from those tubes. Will paste the results and graphs as soon as I get my T valve.
    1 point
  25. So the issue that landed me in this mess was the fact that the inverter would switch off my panels once the batteries are fully charged. I thought that must be a mistake and obviously updated the firmware. (I used the wrong firmware which made the inverter unresponsive. Then got the proper firmware from Growatt which fixed the unresponsive inverter.) As mentioned by hoohloc, it turns out this is just the way these SPF XXXX TL HVM inverters operate. So I Googled and Googled to get more info about how the inverter decides when to power up the panels again. All I could find were mentions of SOL and SBU for option 1 and 95% of State of Charge. But experimenting with those settings didn't convince me that they're particularly relevant. For my first experiment this morning I waited for the PV panels to top up the batteries. Then I hooked up my laptop and screen (140W) as a "base" load. Then I added my 1.7kw heat gun and started running it for 2 or 3mins at a time. Watching the voltage drop as I go. At this point my Option 13 was set to 26.5V. After a couple of runs with the heat gun the voltage dropped below 26.5V, but would recover back to 26.8V once I turned the gun off. I even got the voltage to drop down to 26.1V while running the heat gun, but again, after switching it off the batteries recovered to 26.6V... So I got fed up playing with the heat gun and fetched our dehumidifier. I plugged in the dehumidifier with laptop load. The battery voltage dropped to 26.5V and viola! The panels powered up. For the second experiment I recognised that my Option 13 was set to 26.5V so I changed that to 26.7V and waited for the batteries to charge back up. Once full I switched the dehumidifier back on to have about 470W load and waited for the battery voltage to drop again. Low and behold, at 26.7V the PV panels started to charge the batteries. I also tried setting option 13 to 27V, but the panels came on at 26.7V. So my theory about how the SPF 3000 TL HVM 24 decides when to use PV panels is: Use Option 13 if it's less than 95% SoC (26.7V) else use 26.7V Consider Load % from some kind of lookup table. Like the one used to display battery capacity remaining. I'm a little disappointed that this behavior isn't documented somewhere official. Had I known I would have looked further than what seemed like the obvious choice for an "off grid solar inverter". I think that calling this thing an inverter is a little misleading. Maybe calling it a "multi-source battery charger with built in inverter" is more accurate.
    1 point
  26. Thanks H, I'll shoot them an email. Fingers crossed.
    1 point
  27. It can become and expensive hobby when you get sucked in. For example the panel are like a car you will benefit from them the inverter and batteries they like fuel you need it to make the car move. I think the only time it's really effective when you totally off grid , that when you can safely says the system pays for itself but a costly affair for that part. Just my thoughts.
    1 point
  28. I thought registering was required. I am in Cape Town.
    1 point
  29. It is a dangerous money pit
    1 point
  30. Piper

    Another newbie.

    Hi yes. At this stage installed 2 AC/DC 5kv (4000 watt)inverters in par.Basicly its an axpert type Sako inverter. And planing to have about 30kw of storage but only 9kw bought so far.Still working on the solar panel side of things aswell.
    1 point
  31. Coulomb

    Introduction

    That should be a picnic to wire up . Just noticing the picnic tables in the background...
    1 point
  32. De0n19

    Barry8355

    Looks like the battery voltage is indeed 40v to 450v.
    1 point
  33. I think we are on two different pages, I was literally just talking about a heat pump vs evacuated tube solar water heating, not batteries, power walls or inverters.
    1 point
  34. I have to disagree on this one(At least in my situation). Unfortunately my geysers can never be heated to temperature on most days on just vacuum tubes. I am stuck using 8Kwh/day to heat water (family of 4. 2 geysers used for showers etc...). Even though I off set this with my abundance of PV Power during the day, it still means that in isolation my hot water heating requirements require 8Kwh of AC power. Now if I had a heat pump i would achieve that same 8Kwh of heating for 3Kwh of energy usage. My Solar Vacuum Tubes would have to work really well on my two geysers to make up for that savings(Which clearly they don't). Furthermore it means that if more hot water is required in the early mornings, I will be utilizing my heat pump (COP of +- 3) instead of being stuck using a traditional element (COP of 1). Basically my logic is that my heat pumps guarantee me a 65% savings regardless of weather while with a solar water heating system i am guarenteed a savings only when the Incoming Solar Radiation makes it viable. The rest of the time I will be stuck using an Element, or having cold water. I have no doubts that changing water use habits could significantly improve the energy consumption problems and i have started adapting how i use the element during the day to save on heating the next morning, but overall if I did not have solar power(PV), I am strongly convinced the heat pump would have been the better option. I found this article a few years ago, obviously to be taken lightly and critically as it is written by a company that manufactures heat pumps and solar heating systems. I thought it was an interesting read. PV vs Solar Thermal vs Gas vs Heat Pump Water Heating (itssolar.co.za)
    1 point
  35. Agree, get another technician to check it out. Regarding NRVs, do not use the spring valves, they only handle up to 60C after which the rubber washer start to warp. Install the swing valve at an angle, one without a washer as they can handle very high temps. Scroll down on this link to see an example http://www.tecron.co.za/?controller=pages&view=load&id=spares_parts_and_accessories. Also, if you install these with a ball valve on each side to close it off you can simply open the swing valve at the top and clean it out if dirty, close again and open ball valves for water to flow again. I did that, so whenever I notice syphoning possibly taking place I do a 5 min cleaning with no need to replace the valve. Very simple. Rian
    1 point
  36. Hi you might have seen my posts about growatt inverters. I was powering my 3kw geyser element with my 5kw growatt inverter and about 6kw pv panels which works on sunny days but sucks ass when it's not. So I invested in a heat pump got one installed by local guys here in the midlands. I'm very impressed. I never overload my inverter anymore, it takes 30 minutes to an hour to heat a 200l Geyser to 55celcius compared to 2 to 3 hours with a traditional element which was set to 60 Celsius. I can also power the tiny 1200 watts the heat pump uses with batteries without any issues. I have 10kw storage. I would recommend it to everyone.
    1 point
  37. i have all the lights and plugs plus one aircon (only run it when grid or pv is available )on the essential side , two geysers, washing machine,tumble dryer, dishwasher/pool pump on non-essential, works great.
    1 point
  38. Tariq

    Tripping my DB

    @Basil Katakuzinos, yes, that is the correct way
    1 point
  39. From what I have seen/read about, a majority of the solar installations around the world are grid tied only and feeding into the grid, so you are right, feeding in should not be an issue for the inverter. So that is why I am waiting for @Erastusto tell us how he makes feed in to the grid feasible.
    1 point
  40. Technically it won't run full tilt. When you throw a max load on the inverter while on batteries, then it will be running full tilt converting that 48v DC to 220v AC and at the max capacity. When running on Sun and feeding back, you should be closer to 480v most of the sunny part. However this time it just have to down convert from 480v DC to 220v AC and that takes less effort. Also, only at the max it get from the sun minus house load. Not specifically at the limit the inverter can do.
    1 point
  41. Tariq

    Introduction

    @0012, welcome to the group, that is a grand system you are installing
    1 point
  42. I've got some bad news for you on the PV production front. In summer, the panels get hot and reduce their output, but you do get longer sunshine hours which helps. I find that September is my best month for PV production because we get good sunshine and its cool! In summer in JHB we get rain, cloud etc so summer months are actually not that great, Spring is best.
    1 point
  43. The biggest advantage is making them work properly with the C version. We deal with a lot of the installers, suppliers and en users out there, and we have noticed a situation where B's and C's in a mixture ends up giving an error, which (thus far) seems to be resolved when all of them are on the latest firmware. If you don't have that situation, then the default principle applies: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it"
    1 point
  44. The OverFrequency 1 bar is specified above and in the manual as a default Hysteresis 1.45 when it is actually a default of 1.95, do not change this parameter, it is a "copyedit error/typo" in the manual and is not intended to be changed from the default value
    1 point
  45. Erastus

    My Standby Power System

    Switches mounted in the bookshelf:
    1 point
  46. Erastus

    My Standby Power System

    The most basic version can even be without the control relays. This version charges the batteries give me +/- 6 hours standby for 5 Lewd down lighters. The 220V switch over switches over as soon as there is no 220V. Nothing fancy but works like a dream. The control relays has 2 purposes. The on/off switches is made to look like a book in a bookshelf so I do not want any thick cables. The control cct with central control and wireless communications will follow soon. This version is an illustration of a Eskom light back up system for less than R900.
    1 point
  47. Just a few things to remember when installing a Ziehl You will need the following: AND One or two 63A contactors Install using the following connection diagram. Please remember to bridge L1 - L2 - L3 when single phase are used. Return wires (Feedback from Contactors) are not required in SA. I have used 48VDC to power the unit, but you can can chose to use the grid voltage. I have used grid voltage to switch the contactors. I have Chosen 63Amp Din rail mount DB contactors (Schneider) Putting the unit into programming mode: Switch the supply on. Look at the following picture. The unit comes with the seal not in place. If the Led between the 2 locks are Red, slightly lift the key cover and turn it 180 degree. While turning you will see a Small blue pin like switch behind the key cover. Use the key cover and press down firmly on the blue pin for 2 seconds. The Led should turn to Green now. Once the LED is Green you can continue with the configuration. Configuration: There are 2 Programs to chose from PRG5 is used for 230Volt Phase to Neutral, 1 or 3 Phase PRG6 is used for 400Volt phase to phase systems with no Neutral. Press the UP arrow 1 time to display "InFo." Press the RIGHT button 5 times to display "PR 1" Press the UP button till you reach "PR 5" or "PR 6" Press the RIGHT button 1 time to display "no" Press the DOWN button 1 time to display "YES" Press the Right button. The Device will reset and start with the new program. Every time a new program is selected, all the settings revert to the default settings. Changing Settings: ONLY after you selected the relevant program for your installation, you should continue to the settings. Press the UP button 2 times to get to the first Menu on the Settings LIst. Use the Right Button to Scroll through the 5 settings of each Parameter. Use the UP and Down buttons to change the setting to mach the settings on the list. Once done with all 5 settings, use the UP button to scroll to the next Parameter on the list. The settings for South Africa are as follows. Once you done, remove and re-apply the power, the unit will go through a 60 Second "self check" that might be followed by another count down. Once that is complete and all conditions are within spec, the Contactors should energize. Once you are satisfied with the settings, press the blue pin till the LED turns red. Apply the seal, but dont crimp it till you are sure no one wants to check your settings.
    1 point
  48. Version 3.10

    380 downloads

    Reading live data from Goodwe ES Power Inverters from Local Area Network for Windows XP, 7, 8.1 and 10. Shows data sent by UDP packets. Installation instructions inside the .zip file. Please comment on any errors found. Any suggestion is welcome. Version 1.0: November 7, 2020 Version 2.0: January 22, 2021 Version 3.0: May 16, 2021 Youtube short video In Operation: Version 1.0.
    1 point
  49. I had my faulty US3000C replaced under warranty and before I sent it back I took some pictures to share with everyone. I did not strip it down completely for obvious reasons. Would have been interested to see what microcontroller and mosfets were used in this model. Not my best pictures but some are better than none. Things to note; the battery packs which houses the cell pouches are now encased in some form of metal with a plastic top cover. The other distinct difference is the new board, now only one single board that handles Comms and Power management, probably costs less from a manufacturer perspective but this is the new V10R04 board revision. The same board is found in the US2000C models. Currently v1.9 firmware is available for them. The other notable difference is the orange cables joining each battery pack in series. I was happy to see the improvements made. So thumbs up to Pylontech!
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...