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Thank you for the great forum, Safe Driving over the weekend. Sincerely Jason

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  1. 5 points
    plonkster

    Solar quote

    Maybe it's an old quote that was adapted and some things slipped through? Maybe the spec was 19.5kWh and the hour bit got left off.... who knows. Me... I cannot imagine spending 70k on batteries and then going with the cheap Axpert inverter. That's like fitting a PVC bullbar to your Hilux...
  2. 3 points
    plonkster

    New Installation advice required?

    Man... I would say let sleeping dogs dogs lie. The official reason for the 25% limit is that they want to limit the "pick up". When an embedded generator trips, whatever it was powering needs to be picked up by the grid. When some anomaly on the grid (low voltage event for example) causes the entire neighbourhood's embedded generators to disconnect, the grid has to pick up all of that. So they are not at all concerned about how much is being fed in, they are concerned about the spike that results of all those feeders go away. So while one would think you can build a system that generates 10kW, but you carefully control it so no more than 3.5kw goes into the grid... that would not be allowed, because that has a potential pick-up of 10kw... not just 3.5. Now one would also think that if you put a 5kVA hybrid inverter (eg a Multiplus-II) on the grid, with 3.5kW of PV modules... that inverter can supply the difference from the batteries, so it could potentially push as much as 4kW from the combined DC sources, and therefore the pickup for that combo is in actual fact 4kw (and not just 3.5). But CoCT looks only at the PV modules (the PV module is the generator, not the inverter)... and so you can get it approved if the PV array or the inverter is small enough... disregarding the battery component completely.
  3. 3 points
    Youda

    Youda's off-grid LAB

    An update from my solar Lab: As some of you might remember, I'm currently running 3x InfiniSolar 5K combined into a single-phase AC source of 15kW. Most of the year, it's okay, since there's plenty of sunlight and the idle consumption of the three running inverters does not matter. But during winter, it's a completely different story and every watthour, that I'm able to save, is crucial. Therefore, I decided to code a feature that will allow me to run just a single inverter 24x7 and once there's need for a more power, start two other inverters automatically. So, here's the result: I created a short LUA script in Fibaro, that's constantly checking the AC load. Normally, just one 5kW inverter is running. Once the AC load goes above 4000W, the script starts other 2 inverters. It takes just a couple of seconds, and 15kW of power is ready to serve the loads. I've added a safety function, that will turn-off all three inverters once the SOC of the Pylontech stack falls bellow 25%. Once this happens, there's an ATS that will automatically switch all the house circuits to "ESKOM". Later, if all the inverters are OFF and SOC goes above 70%, then the script starts 1st InfiniSolar and the ATS will switch all the circuits back to the PV. Here's the GUI: Here's the main part of the LUA script: Since I have an EV charging wallbox installed too, I've also added a second script, that works like this: Normally, just one 5kW inverter is running. If there's no EV connected, the wallbox advertises 10A AC charging (2300W). Once the EV starts to draw power from the wallbox, the script will start another two inverters. Once all three inverters are running, the script will instruct wallbox to advertise 32A charging (7300W). GUI: I was too lazy to implement a function that will automatically turn-off two of the inverters once their power is not needed. But since I can turn them off via the mobile app, I'm okay with that. But I will add such power-off function later....maybe
  4. 3 points
    Carl

    New Installation advice required?

    Technically this is called "Current Level Discrimination" and is a technique linked to the staging of the Long Time (LT) tripping curves of two serial-connected circuit-breakers. (Quoted from the Schneider Electrical installation guide) An interesting point is that overload protection of a cable can be implemented either at the source or at the load side but short circuit protection has to be implimented at the source. @plonksteris spot on.
  5. 2 points
    admiral

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    Out of curiousity... the 25 % rule is for the breaker connecting your property to the grid? In a complex, we have a 600A breaker - so I can merrily have 33 kilowatt of generation going on here?
  6. 2 points
    plonkster

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    Exactly. The AC-input limit that Multis and Quattros have for the last decade or so, mostly used by people in boats and yachts who have limited shore supplies. You can use that for this purpose. The limit works in both directions, both for current drawn but also for current fed back. The reason is simple: For its intended use, the point of the feature is to prevent the breaker on the other end from tripping. That breaker works in both directions, so you have to apply the limit in both directions too. This limit can be used to limit your feed-in to 3.5kw, simply by setting an AC-input limit of 15A. The problem is that it also limits your draw from the grid to 3.5kw. The rest has to come from the batteries. If you can live with that, then you can use this feature very effectively to have more power available for your own loads, without feeding it into the grid. The other option is the Maximum Inverter Power setting in the ESS menu. You could install a 5kVA Multi, and limit it to 3.5kw. In theory this gains you 1.1kw, since the 3kVA unit is limited to 2.4kw grid-tied. And again, if the grid fails, you have the full 5kw available for backup loads.
  7. 2 points
    Hi guys I grew up with an interest in electronics, playing with peg boards and electronics kits. I was heading towards a technical career, until the world of finance called. I still do the odd DIY project with DC and AC and get my hands dirty, but nothing hectic. Electrickery can kill you, so there's a healthy respect there. I, like many, am becoming increasingly frustrated with the loadshedding situation. I have managed fine by just being prepared and dealing with the inconvenience. However, I have a little one on the way (due late April) which changes things. I cannot leave my wife and newborn at home with no electricity, especially due to the fact that I have no cell signal (I live in a cell signal dead spot). So it’s time to make a plan. I have an efergy power monitor so I know what my average daily consumption and peak consumption is. I have reduced my consumption pretty much as far as I can, by decreasing geyser temp, changing to LED lights etc. I use about 4.5kwh per day (excluding geyser and stove) and apparently that’s pretty low. Based on my interest in electronics and gadgets, together with the consumption and backup requirements, I have started looking around at various solutions. This forum was mentioned on another forum that I am on, so I came to check it out and am amazed at the amount of knowledge that is here. I have A LOT of reading to do! Originally, I started off thinking small. I need to keep the internet going for about 3 hours at a time. I checked my “box of random cables” and found that an old nokia 3310 charger fits the router and an old printer power supply fits the optical unit. I thought of cutting these cables and attaching to a decent 12v battery. Charge the battery when AC available. I could probably do this under R1k, as well as get some extra batteries and cheap Chinese DC lights/LED strips dotted around the house. Bit of a hassle and manual intervention required. But ticks a box and is cheap. OR….I looked at the long use UPS options. A basic inverter with 2 lead acid batteries in a trolley format, plug relevant appliances into trolley. Lots of cheapies around and most have high voltage variances (only the 5kVa Axpert was ±5%, others were 10% or more). This option, with 200ah, was about R11k. More capacity, can run more appliances, still a bit of hassle, requiring extension cords etc. But ticks more boxes. OR….If I am going the inverter route, do it properly and wire into DB. Run all light and plug circuits. Don’t feel loadshedding. Happy days. Extra $$$. Then I think to myself, if I go this route I must add panels, and if I add panels, I might as well get a hybrid inverter and feed back into the grid (I have a rotational meter). Here I was looking at a Goodwe 4ES 4.6kva with 2.4 - 4.8kwh and add some panels. And then I got a quote from an installer with a Schneider 4kw, Pylontech 4kwh system at R150k. At this point, I get despondent and take a long walk to forget about it. The slippery slope catches me and by the time I stop to look up, I have a system that way exceeds my budget and requirements. I am going to read up more on this forum and hope that the slope isn’t so slippery this time round. I am open to any and all advice, I really appreciate it. Cheers Craig
  8. 2 points
    pvdw22

    Indicator Light

    VisN I would prefer to do that and I do think that SANS will agree. My way of reasoning is that even when you trip the isolator/CB between your inverter and backup loads the lights on the inverter will stay on. This for me is not a correct indication of what is going on in the DB. I do my installs with 2 lights, 1 for mains and 1 for alternative power, and goes for both solar and generator installs. Here is the SANS regulation. a) supplies power only to certain circuits in a distribution board, a power-on indicator (visible or audible) shall be provided on each such distribution board as well as a notice indicating that the standby power main switch shall also be switched off in an emergency, b) only supplies a part of the electrical installation, the notice shall also be displayed on each distribution board in that part of the installation (see 6.6.1.1(d)).
  9. 2 points
    plonkster

    New Installation advice required?

    No, for two reasons. The breaker is there to protect the cable. Without the breaker, the cable could get hot and set something on fire. If the cable is not rated for 80A, you cannot just upgrade the breaker. Even if the cable can handle 80A, you have to remember there is usually also a breaker on the other end of the cable, one you don't have easy access to. This one is usually larger than the one on your end, because that adds specificity to the system: The one on your end will trip before the one on that end. If you upgrade it, then you may need to call the municipality each time it trips on the wrong end (plus, they will probably start to look for the reason too). You have to apply to have the breaker upgraded. CoCT has already indicated they will not upgrade it if your sole reason is that you want to install a larger SSEG.
  10. 2 points
    isimobile

    Retrieve VenusGX Data

    You can get the raw data from dbus Or can also download the data that is send to Vrm from the Vrm portal under advanced menu option. There is a little download icon top right hand side to download data in csv format. Start here to get access to your Venus device https://www.victronenergy.com/live/ccgx:root_access. Follow the links in the post. Also once you have access use this little tool, it will help you a lot. https://github.com/victronenergy/dbus-spy Hope it helps, Enjoy!
  11. 1 point
    ebrsa

    ICC-Solar

    @P1000 I have now been using ICC since it became available, I guess about 3 years or so and AICC, its predecessor before that. I have 2 x 4KW Axpert (Proline rebrand) inverters in parallel and have never bothered to use emonCMS. ICC runs on a Raspberry Pi, the dashboard which I access from my PC, mobile phone or tablet with RealVNC, works worldwide. I use a router which I flashed with Gargoyle firmware which has a VPN server via which I connect to my LAN with the portable devices. I also have the MQTT remote dashboard on a Win10 PC but have managed to run it with Wine on my main PC which has Ubuntu18.04LTS as operating system. There is in addition a BMV700 (I still regret not having bought the BMV702 or 712) connected to the RPi. ICC does all all the switching between solar/batteries and grid based on time and state of charge. Amost all settings on the inverters can be changed on the dashboard, such as times it switches, minimum and maximum SOC for switching, charge rates for grid and solar etc. Better take a look at the dashboard photos on the ICC website, iccsoftware.co.za.The only setting that I have to do on the inverters is the time the chargers, MPPT and grid, will maintain the bulk charging voltage. I use this only because the I have not managed te set the BMV700 to fully charge the batteries. But there may be afundemental problem because my Trojan T105 batteries requires a bulk charging voltage of 59.3V and the Axpert maximum is 58.4V. So I just keep the chargers at 58.4V for 120 minutes. Right now, it being summer and mostly sunny on the West Coast where I live, ICC switches to grid at 17h00 and back to solar/battery at 23h00. My battery bank is 450AH and minimum voltage is set to 77% SOC, so if that is ever reached ICC will switch to grid until the batteries reach 82% SOC with input priorities set to solar then batteries then grid. My batteries are usually at around 80% SOC in the mornings when the panels start charging them. This with a base load of around 400-450W during the night. I guess emonCMS is great to add additional guages and displays as some members have published on the forum. So far the ones offered on the ICC dashboard hav met my requirements for me. @Krokkedil on the advice of Jaco, the original developer of AICC, I set Axpert parameter 12 to 44V and parameter 13 to 48V, both the lowest values offered. Higher values confuses ICC but that presupposes that one has a Victron BMV7xx connected to the Raspberry Pi to ensure that ICC is fed accurate data which the Axpert is not good at. Parameter 46, the low cut-off voltage is set to 46V but your battery type, parameter 5, has to be set to USR for that to be available. Also both my inverters have been flashed with the Coulomb/Weber firmware version 73.00e which works great. I hope this improves the readings you are getting as it did for me.
  12. 1 point
    I measured the 240watts ...
  13. 1 point
    Chris Louw

    Axpert Solar Watt Question

    The different specifications is because there is 2 different solar chargers available with these 1000 w inverters , a MPPT charger or a PWM charger . Look like you have the PWM charger . The example with the 85 watt panels seems the best for inverter with the PWM .This will keep voltage best working range 15 v - 18 v . Just make sure witch tipe of solar charger you have .The expert Coulomb will then be able to assist you better .
  14. 1 point
    Fazil

    Solar quote

    I am sure you just gave the Hilux guys an idea lol But the Solar MD team seem to be doing some impressive stuff with the Axpert.
  15. 1 point
    Communication was a bit sketchy, but I did receive my order.
  16. 1 point
    @Eujean Hugo normally, your reseller/distributor should be able to assist with diagnostics, or getting the BatteryView software to you. Since distributors generally don't care, just check my LAB for the donwload. The link is in the description bellow. PS: Download, the guide on creating a serial cable, and how to use the software is in the middle of the page2
  17. 1 point
    Bobster

    ICC-Solar

    The general idea is that it's free as in "open" not as in "free beer". Which, as @plonkster points out, means that the vendor doesn't have you over a barrel. Usually there's no license fees for the OS and DBMS, but nobody should begrudge a software vendor a reasonable per hour fee for development or support. If you think I'm ripping you off, you have the source code and unless there's a contract between us that stipulates otherwise you can get somebody else in to maintain your systems and see how good a job they do (and know that you can't hold me to any kind of guarantee for the work the other guy does).
  18. 1 point
    Bobster

    Basic load shedding solution

    Before I went to a solar hybrid system, I had a UPS and did what you describe - just kept a few essentials going during load shedding. It does make a difference. Now, this depends on the layout of the house, but I found that using two extension leads I was able to back up a fridge, two standard lamps and our entertainment systems. This left one outlet open on the UPS and I had a short lead from that to a double sided socket (OK... a very short extension lead) for charging phones and such. What made it all work is a property that all these systems have these days, that they cut over automatically. So the input side of the inverter was just plugged into a wall socket and the box was parked in a corner with the extension leads going around the edges of the sitting room so there was little danger of tripping over them. But eventually I decided that it wasn't that hard to look into the crystal ball and see that electricity supply was going to be a problem for 2 years at least. And not just load shedding but, in Johannesburg anyway, all the other outages due to aged and overloaded infrastructure. And the price would continue to go up and that made the economic proposition better or at least less bad. Plus I had twice had to restock the deep freeze after long outages (OK, in the short term the insurance pays, but the insurer giveth and the insurer taketh away or else the insurer would not be in business). So I cut to the chase. Solar isn't cheap, but you have to take a long term view of the costs and factor in the soft value as well - keeping the fridges going, keeping the security system on, being able to help out friends and family who are without electricity.
  19. 1 point
    With instrumentation it makes perfect sense. You would only connect one side of a Ground wire or Shield to get rid of any noise that might interfere with the signal or communication. By connecting the other side of said wire you stand the risk that you might create a Path back to the PLC or DCS for fault current to flow and you dont want that, so you only connect the earth/ground at the source side in most cases. Edit: In the event of connecting both you might create a Ground loop, this is when the instrument is not grounded on its own and you have a potential difference between "Real Ground" and the instrument ground. Should a fault occur and current flow back through the Ground wire to the source, it will create noise / hum in the line and that is exactly what you would guard against.
  20. 1 point
    PJJ

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    You should! You could also even cover the potential role we solar + storage folks can play in helping with grid services
  21. 1 point
    PJJ

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    Sorry if it wasn't clear in my post, but that is exactly what I tried to illustrate, its not the capacity of a single home that is the problem, its this added load that potentially thousands of inverters could all add to the grid following a loadshedding event, on top of the already big strain the system would face from just geysers/fridges etc all kicking in as well.
  22. 1 point
    PJJ

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    Well you could but you won't, because your demand would be whatever it was before. (predating your install) In the install that I mentioned earlier where the AC Input limit works so great, that house never had a event where the main breaker tripped due to drawing too much power. But after the install, maxing the 70A charger of the 5kVA Multi you will see that your grid power draw now goes up by a additional 3.7KW+- because of the AC Charger. Now multiply that by potentially thousands of homes and you will see that you might have a peak demand problem right after a loadshedding event.
  23. 1 point
    PaBz0r

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    This is now if they haven't forced you to install a 15A breaker.. as per some diagrams we have seen.
  24. 1 point
    plonkster

    Circumventing the COCT 3.5kVA limit

    There must be a misunderstanding here. What they want to avoid is the massive spike that results from charging batteries after an outage. Whether your loads are all on the output or not doesn't matter... after an outage they all pile back onto the grid anyway regardless of where they are connected. The one variable is the battery charging. But indeed, if you use the AC input limit as described earlier, then you wont be able to use the full 50A capacity of the transfer switch. It will never draw more than 15A from the grid, and never push more than 15A into the grid. For some houses this will work fine, but for some it won't.
  25. 1 point
    plonkster

    Why your BMS is not an optional extra

    Again, I disagree. At the higher end of the voltage range, preciously little energy is needed to raise the voltage, and conversely, preciously little extra energy is stored by pushing the voltage up. Once you go above 3.45V per cell, little extra energy is stored, and above 3.55V per cell the battery itself can be pushed overvoltage with as little as 50mA. The balancers in the Pylontech can't pass a lot of current either, so where other batteries can bleed off a couple hundred milliamps this one can't. There is a thread here on the forum where someone explains the guts of the Pylontech battery. The battery considers the cell full at 3.48V per cell. That's a total of 52.2V for a 15s battery. Adding an additional few hundred millivolts -- and again I tested and verified this myself -- gives the balancers something to work with and the SOC levels off at 100% instead of jittering between 99 and 100. My theory is that the 53.2V limit advertised by the Pylontech BMS is as high as marketing could push it without engineering complaining too much
  26. 1 point
    plonkster

    Why your BMS is not an optional extra

    There is a CAN-bms protocol, a simple thing based on simple CAN 2.0A (11 bit, 500kbaud), which was designed by a German company, then made it into the first LG batteries, got copied by others, and now it is used by almost any battery with a CAN-bms. This has become the defacto standard (aka in practice). I know Revov has interface hardware that talks to the BMS using RS485, then talks to the Victron stack using VE.Direct, thereby making the BMS look like a BMV-7xx. This way you can communicate SOC, voltage and current, but you cannot do voltage and current control (not implemented in VE.Direct). Technically all of this is just software, and if you're inverter has an RS485 port and the relevant software to talk to the battery, it will work just fine. The thing is that few inverters do it this way. On a Victron system we actually have the best chance at making it work natively. You could use the existing RS485 cable, and then develop a driver for it. See for example this driver, which is for IMT solar irradiation sensors, which also connect via RS485. So it doesn't really matter what interface you use. What matters is what the manufacturer requires for warranty purposes
  27. 1 point
    Richard Mackay

    48v PoE lighting

    I''m not saying that AC power doesn't have its place. Industry lives and dies by AC. My point is that for many applications it need not necessarily be AC power or nothing. Consider when you get up in the morning and start your day: Probably the first time you actually switch on an AC device is when you get to the kitchen. Wiring a house with different wiring reticulation for different electrical power standards might be expensive but that shouldn't stop us acknowledging what the most efficient prospect is. And in different situations different solutions will apply.
  28. 1 point
    By changeover I mean one of these: Because I need somewhere to put the changeover. Given that space is usually constrained in DB1, which is why people do this stuff in the first place, it just makes more sense Edit: Just to be clear, I do feed DB2 via the inverter. The changeover is left in the "inverter" position during normal operation, and the AC power from DB1 only makes a short "stop over" in DB2 in order to 1) connect to the grid side of the changeover switch and 2) to put in an additional breaker to protect the input cable of the inverter. The idea is that it should be possible to issolate the inverter completely without leaving DB2 without power.
  29. 1 point
    plonkster

    Load shedding

    It's actually not a completely nuts idea. Some really clever people think it might have some warrant: https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/227126-neil-degrasse-tyson-says-its-very-likely-the-universe-is-a-simulation Of course (just like with Panspermia), that just pushes things back another level, raising even more questions. It's fun thinking about it though.
  30. 1 point
    Bobster

    SEMS portal :'(

    Smack the cow and paint the barn red! I got this - the missing devices/energy flow tab - this morning. What I found was that it was a sizing issue. For some reason the page contents were too big for the browser window and so the tab was hidden. OK... having a brand new lap top and monitor might have something to do with it. Anyhoo... I zoomed out (ctrl -) and there they were.
  31. 1 point
    Bobster

    New Installation advice required?

    Is the idea to go completely off grid? That's expensive. You need enough battery to contend with a period of sustained gloomy weather, enough solar panels to get them charged up in good time, and an inverter that can handle that. Plus probably a generator as a last resort. use the first two years for learning what your property draws and when, and how long your system can run the essential circuits. Also use the various apps to identify high loads on the property and decide what to do about them. Consider going to gas for cooking and solar or heat pump for water heating as they are two of the biggest loads in your house. A point I always make. Get a COC (or amendment to your existing COC) from a competent person and make sure your insurers get a copy and know that you have a solar system. Otherwise if the worst comes to the worst they will send out a loss adjuster who will very quickly notice that there are wiring changes that they weren't told about or is not described on your COC and so you have misdeclared the risk to them and so the policy is voided.
  32. 1 point
    Ahh yes, I did already have the architect specify double conduit to everywhere, and conduit from roof/ceiling to garage.
  33. 1 point
    I've recently purchased and installed the following: 1 x Growatt SPF 5000TL HVM 5kVA/5kW Hybrid Inverter. 2 x Pylontech US3000 batteries. 1 x Pylontech cable kit with RJ45 BMS comms cable included. I've just spent 5 days communicating with Growatt in China to figure out why I could not get the inverter to communicate with the BMS on the master battery properly. After many, many emails back and forward, and far too many hours of research online, I finally got it right today and I think it is worth sharing this information here, in case anybody else needs it, because I couldn't find the right information anywhere on the internet, all in one place, explained properly. It turns out that the Growatt SPF5000 has to be connected to the Pylontech batteries differently to the way Axpert inverters are connected to Pylontech batteries. Everything I was reading online was saying that you need to plug the RJ45 comms cable into the CAN port on the master battery and then into the BMS port on the inverter, and then you need to set the battery type to Li (setting 05 on Axpert and Growatt inverters) and then choose Li profile L02 (also apparently the same for Axpert and Growatt inverters). It turns out, the Growatt does NOT communicate via the CAN port. It communicates via the RS485 port that is positioned below the CAN port on the master battery. And in addition to that, it requires a 9600 baud rate, which you can set using the 4 small white dipswitches on the master battery. For the Growatt you must set those dipswitches to: 1 0 0 0 (ON OFF OFF OFF) When connected to the CAN port and put into Li (L02) mode, the Growatt inverter faults and gives an error 20 and an error 04 constantly. When connected to the RS485 port with the dipswitches set to 1000, comms is immediately established and it works as intended. I also installed 2 firmware updates on the inverter, that were sent to me by Growatt in China (who were very helpful through this entire process despite not actually giving me the information I actually needed to solve this), but in retrospect I actually wonder if those firmware updates even made a difference because I was able to put the inverter into Li (L02) mode before applying those firmware updates anyway, I just didn't know about the RS485 port and the dipswitches. Recommended configuration process 1. Turn inverter on but run off battery only. Disable A/C input and A/C output (use isolator switches if you have them). 2. Go to setting 5 and select battery type = Li. Then select profile L02 (This is specifically for Pylontech batteries). Push ESC to return to home screen. Go back to setting 5 and verify that it was saved as Li. 3. Now shutdown the inverter and batteries completely. Turn the batteries off using the on/off flip switch, not just the red button on the master battery. 4. Now make sure that the end of the comms cable on the battery side (it will probably have a little sticker on it that says BAT) is plugged into the RJ45 port labelled RS485 that is below the CAN port. And also make sure that the other end is plugged into the RJ45 port labelled BMS on the inverter and NOT into the other RJ45 port that is labelled RS485 (Yes, I know, it's weird, just go with it). 5. Now set the 4 little white dipswitches to: ON OFF OFF OFF (1000). 6. Now turn the batteries back on and then turn the inverter back on. You should no longer see any fault codes or the red fault light. How to tell that the inverter really is communicating with the BMS properly 1. You should now see a little Li symbol next to the battery icon on the home screen of the inverter, and that Li symbol should NOT be flashing. When it's not flashing and is solid it means comms is working. 2. If you go and look at most of the battery values on the status screens or in settings related to battery level (SOC) you should now see percentage values where there were voltage values before. Setting 21 is a good example of that. I hope this helps somebody else because the information available online with regards to the Growatt routers is of no help in this regard and most of the information available relates to Axpert inverters, which appear to be very similar to the Growatt at face value, but communicate with the Pylontech batteries differently from what I can see.
  34. 1 point
    mmacleod

    48v PoE lighting

    There are obviously limitations. However a happy thing has happened in recent years, the ever improving efficiency of LEDs and the ever increasing power delivery capabilities of various PoE standards have crossed over, such that for reasonable sized lighting the wattage delivered is enough. Some of the latest PoE standards available approach 90W, older ones around 30W, even 30W is quite ample power for a modern LED fixture. This does mean that a separate cable probably needs to be run for each fixture instead of daisy chaining, but I don't see this as a bad thing really as ethernet cable is not that expensive. One final thing worth noting is that these standards assume ethernet cables of up to 100m in length (as this is what ethernet standard allows for as well) - so for shorter runs the wattage capabilities are actually (in theory) a bit greater than what the standard suggests, even if one probably doesn't want to utilise this extra capability.
  35. 1 point
    Jaco de Jongh

    6kw Li-iron tech

    Guys there is a serious shortage of lithium's in the country, how on earth can anybody offer a special?? Normal supply and demand.....
  36. 1 point
    Fuenkli

    New Installation advice required?

    have a look here: https://powerforum.co.za/topic/5165-circumventing-the-coct-35kva-limit/
  37. 1 point
    plonkster

    Load shedding

    I think there are two things that are being managed. The first is the peak power use. Once you have power stations tripping, you get the domino effect that could trip the whole grid, so this one is arguably the most important one. The second one is the total energy use. You can only generate so much kWh in a day, and you need to keep some of it spare for 1) contractual obligations to SAPP, Southern African Power Pool, 2) replenishing pumped storage ahead of peak times, 3) saving on Diesel costs. This is why we have load shedding in the early hours of the morning and on weekends while one would expect plenty of spare capacity: that energy is needed for these things. When considered in order of priority, I suspect saving Diesel is the last item on the list, outdone by peak management, contractual obligations, and pumped storage. It's from this second set of parameters (the non-peak ones) where you will see the greatest amount of diminishing returns.
  38. 1 point
    You're quite correct; my bad. Here is my block diagram to cover most of the Axpert models: Ignore the red part (for Axpert King only) and the blue lettering and line (for 145 V max MPPT only). But since the max PV is say 4 kW and the inverter can handle 5 kW, the inverter isn't in a place where it will be the bottleneck. Let's say there is a 6 kW load, and 2 kW of PV. The inverter is rated at 5 kW, so it is forced into line mode, so the top switch is closed. So power can flow from the AC-in to the AC-out. But in SUB mode, the other switch would also be on, so that PV power can flow to the load as well. The inverter can't handle all the load, but it doesn't have to; the AC-in is there to supply part of the load. So 4 kW will come from AC-in, blending with 2 kW from the PV, to provide 6 kW to the load. The inverter only carries the PV-supplied portion of the load. It's possible for part of the PV power to charge the battery, via the bidirectional DC-DC converter (at right). In that case, less power supports the load, obviously.
  39. 1 point
    some times I drive past a very small plattelandse primary school (total of two buildings, 3 cars in the staff parking area, the shade of the big blue gums being more attractive to the children than the multi-coloured klim-en-klouter play area..) on the entrance gate from the tar road a sign that says "kom in om te leer" ... think a similar slogan is apt for a forum like this and the knowledge that people like yourself freely share... ..that boat has already left the harbour.. any case, as per original topic/question, answer is that ESS is unlikely to on any practical level reduce battery lifespan.
  40. 1 point
    If the little one arrives in winter, and you have to keep a room warm... that's the biggest consumer. Of course many people also buy a tumble dryer at this point. If you're looking at doing such a thing, definitely look at the more energy efficient options. I found that the Bosch condenser dryer is definitely more efficient than a normal Defy vented one, and I also discovered recently that the heat-pump units are no longer an arm and a leg... they are only an arm or half-a-leg now Of course you have to make sure the router actually has a 12V PSU, but I'm sure you did. You can buy small SMPS boards from hobbyist places for next to nothing, as little as R25. Just always remember to fuse it. What I would actually suggest is a bit of a middle-of-the-road approach. Go with the UPS trolley, but use a better inverter, one that can actually serve the whole house at some future point. @Jaco de Jongh built one for @Ironman, like this, but at this moment most solar installers are totally overworked, some even turn their phones off for a part of the day just to get the quotes done. Also, lead time on batteries is in the 1-2 months bracket. What I did in my house (with the help of a friend ), is I fitted two of these 32A generator/welding plugs to the wall. The entire solar system lives in an old network cabinet, and simply plugs in. It has the additional upside that if I need to use a backup generator, it will plug in really easily. Of course this is going to be quite a bit more than the 11k hardware store one, but it will be way less than the 150k full home one.
  41. 1 point
    I decided to knock the top plastic cover off the enertec maintenance free battery and have a look inside... as expected the water level is low ... the battery is still fully charged after all this time. I have been trying to find someone to look at the RCT inverter ...got hold of Rectron (RCT) they are not interested ....unless i have proof of purchase from them and the unit is still under warranty ...not interested as they do not do repairs. So i contacted Mustek who supply the meccer unit ...very helpful ...they also have technical people who do repairs to the units under warranty ...but because this unit is not a meccer the person gave me a number for a company who handles out of warranty repairs. This is certainly going to help make a decision on which unit to purchase in the future... i wouldnt even consider Rectron unless their price is half that of mustek. Meccer ...RCT same thing just a different name.
  42. 1 point
    Knew my gut was right but thanks so much for clarifying for my pea brain!
  43. 1 point
    plonkster

    Jinko Solar

    You can't. The spores arrive by wind and if anyone on the island has it, chances are tomorrow you will too. In some parts of the world it gets so bad that people use pressure washers to wash it off the roofs. But for solar panels, I suppose you just wash it and live with it.
  44. 1 point
    These seem to me cloned Axperts, that then evolved on their own in slightly different directions to the Axperts. Essentially, yes. But it depends on exactly when the Growatts copied the Axperts. Very early Axperts had an AC power supply, so that if the utility was present, the utility would run the inverter electronics (some 35 W in a 5 kVA model, if the inverter proper isn't running, so that's processor, lots of electronics, LEDs, display, etc.). [ Edit: from about 2014 or 2015, this power supply was deleted, leading to the behaviour that you are seeing. The first Must clones started appearing late in 2015, so my guess is that the Growatt was copied from a later design without the AC power supply. ] [ Edit: discharging like this is obviously not ideal. ] I believe that this is the reason for the 2 A utility charge option. The idle load is of the order of 1 A, so the 2 A of utility charging compensates for that, and even slightly chargers the battery. Of course, if you are utility charging at say 20 A, then the utility charger just pumps out say 21 A to make 20 A flow into the battery. Does your Growatt have a maxmum utility charge current setting of 2 A?
  45. 1 point
    @Cef Hi Really good work and a great effort you have put in the software.
  46. 1 point
    Your diagram shows a better but not perfectly balanced arrangement; modules B, C, F, and G will contribute less than the others since they have paths that carry higher current (I think; these things always confuse me). You could consider yet one more layer of "diagonal takeoff" to make it "perfect" sharing. But the modules will be at very different states of health now, so perhaps you don't want perfect sharing anyway. I'd first charge and test each module individually to see which if any have any life left in them. If they are flooded, check the water and specific gravity. Perhaps try a desulphator, but I'm rather sceptical of those things. I'm afraid I don't hold much help for them, though perhaps some that were far from the cables might not have had much hard work and might be usable. 12 V is such a low system voltage, even for small inverters; it's just asking for problems with cables and current sharing.
  47. 1 point
    Cef

    RTphoram

    Version 1.0.0

    44 downloads

    Youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqF4P1OCEb4 It makes no sense to download this software without the necessary hardware. Surely very few will use it. The screen images correspond to the last revision, adding certain functionalities to the one shown in the YouTube video, such as Registration in Database with duration of 7 days, auto start, auto rec and for those who do not have a temperature sensor, but if they control the midpoint voltage, I added the corresponding data extracted from the BMV. Relay Status and Alarms also added. On the Eastron connected to the GRID side, Reactive Energy is added, which is interesting to compare with the Active Energy values for certain circumstances. Free lifetime license for all forum users. Comment Thread: https://powerforum.co.za/topic/4112-energy-readings-in-real-time-from-any-power-inverter/
  48. 1 point
    Jaco de Jongh

    Victron ESS proposal

    Smart solar is more advanced with functions like Bluetooth connectivity. Yes Yes Yes Yes, but normally used for different applications. One as a Grid meter and a second measuring a PV inverter on the input or output of the Multi. It looks at what comes in from the grid, and what comes in from the PV, or battery and then Calculates the Loads on AC out for example. Its the most accurate measurement/Calculation systems I have work with so far on inverters. No need to install a second Carlo, all the info you need will be available. The first picture is combined pv values. The ac loads are loads connect before the inverter and the Critical is the loads connected on AC OUT 1 The next is showing all the components separately and clicking the right arrow will take you into its history and more in dept data.
  49. 1 point
    Mstott

    Starting advice needed

    DB is done , now to get going on the Inverter side
  50. 1 point
    plonkster

    Starting advice needed

    Yes. My board is also split into three. The bottom-most row has my heavy non-essential consumers that are directly on the grid. The middle row has almost nothing in it, it holds an extra neutral bar and an isolator/overcurrent for the inverter input. My top row has the essential circuits on the inverter output. There is no need for the middle "solar" distinction. You install an energy meter (the CT that comes with the MP-II) right after the main switch so that the inverter is aware of the high consumers and all loads that are not essential. It will then feed back via AC-1 to cancel out these loads. See the ESS webinar if you have't done so yet. It is on youtube.

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