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  1. Version 3.10

    365 downloads

    Reading live data from Goodwe ES Power Inverters from Local Area Network for Windows XP, 7, 8.1 and 10. Shows data sent by UDP packets. Installation instructions inside the .zip file. Please comment on any errors found. Any suggestion is welcome. Version 1.0: November 7, 2020 Version 2.0: January 22, 2021 Version 3.0: May 16, 2021 Youtube short video In Operation: Version 1.0.
    26 points
  2. Good day All, Over the past couple of months I have received numerous requests to share my NodeRed flows used for monitoring the status of the SunSynk inverter. My initial idea was to package all of the flows into an easy to use package and user interface, however my work loads have not provided me the luxury of time to play around and make it a fool proof system. Please note that the use of these flows are at your own discretion with no liability to either myself, this site nor any members of this site. Do not attempt implement these flows if you are unfamiliar with the working of the ModBus protocol or basic programming. Brief overview of the flows: LoadShedStatus - This flow determines the loadshedding status through a webscraper. I use this information to trigger a secondary set of settings to the inverter in case of load shedding. ModBusRead - This flow is responsible for reading information from the Inverter via the Modbus Flex getter ModBusWrite - This flow is responsible for writing settings back to the inverter via the Modbus flex getter Inverter Monitoring - This flow is responsible for obtaining all of the inverter monitoring values. The values are then send to Home Asssistant via MQTT as well as logged to an InfluxDB for monitoring via Grafana SSFormRead - This flow reads the current system settings from the inverter and display it via the NodeRed UI SSFormWrite - This flow writes any changes made to the system settings via the NodeRed UI back to inverter SSDSRead - This flow reads the "Default Settings" from storage and displays it via the NodeRed UI. I use the "Default Settings" to store my optimal system settings when there is no Load Shedding. SSDSWrite - This flow writes the "Default Settings" from the storage to the Inverter. The flow is also triggered automatically from the LoadShedding status flow SSLSRead - This flow reads the "Load Shedding Settings" from storage and displays it via the NodeRed UI. I use the "Default Settings" to store my optimal system settings when there is no Load Shedding. SSLSWrite - This flow writes the "Load Shedding Settings" from the storage to the Inverter. The flow is also triggered automatically from the LoadShedding status flow TimeMode - This flow triggers different settings on different days of the week. My PV Solar is currently not big enough to carry my whole house, I utilize this flow to feed electricity back into the non-essential loads on the days which my domestic worker is not working. This helps me to optimize my savings on certain days of the week while maintaining healthy battery levels. NodeRed Palettes required for the flows: node-red-contrib-actionflows node-red-contrib-influxdb node-red-contrib-modbus node-red-contrib-queue-gate node-red-contrib-schedex node-red-contrib-simple-gate node-red-dashboard The next couple of posts have been reserved to further expand on the hardware requirements and basic set up of the monitoring. The idea of sharing my flows is to contribute to the community, let us keep this going as a community project by assisting and contributing to project. flows (5).json sunsynk_modbus.docx
    12 points
  3. Energy-Jason

    Powerforum Give Away

    Congratulations to @hoohloc you have been randomly selected and the winner of a RIOT. Pdf attached. Well done!!! We will be having more give aways very soon! Please PM us your delivery details. Jay riot_cloudlink__a4_pamphlet_electronic_fa.pdf
    11 points
  4. PierreJ

    Victron DIY Install

    Got the sign-off from CoCT about a month ago, so my DIY solar project is finally done and dusted. Thanks to everyone on the forum that provided advice - I probably would have stuffed it up if it wasn't for you. The whole project took about three months of evenings and weekends to finish, and was a welcome distraction from the current state of the world. 4 strings of 4 Canadian Solar 400Wp poly panels in series, facing NNE. Another string of 4 Canadian Solar 400Wp panels in series, facing WNW. All five strings are paralleled together for a combined 8kWp. This is my main DB. CoCT installed a new split prepaid meter. According to the technician that installed it it has built-in reverse power blocking. I have tested it to see what it does when I try to feed in power in to the grid, and it charges me in both directions. That is perfectly fine in my opinion - much preferable to it tripping when there is momentary feed-in. Grid power is measured by an ET112. There is a breaker that connects the main DB to the solar installation in the scullery: Top-left is the AC DB. Top-right is the DC combiner box. Bottom left is the Multiplus II 5kVA inverter, and bottom middle the SmartSolar 250/100 MPPT. The SmartSolar was initially running a bit hot for my liking, so I mounted it on a 6mm thick aluminium plate which brought down peak temperatures from 82C to 65C. Bottom-right is the Victron Cerbo. The battery cabinet on the floor contains 5 PylonTech US2000 batteries for a total nominal capacity of 12kWh. I've set it to 80% DoD: Close-up of the DC buses. Close-up of the AC DB, with and without cover. Close-up of the DC combiner box, with and without cover. The geyser and oven, as well as the swimming pool DB are connected to the main DB, so those are unpowered when there is loadshedding. The AC DB in the scullery is connected to the output of the Multiplus, so all the essential loads stay powered when grid power goes down.
    11 points
  5. In this video we asked Keith several questions about Sunsynk and its role in South Africa. Keith is based in China and sent us an excellent and informative video to our request. This video interview offers you a strong insight into Keith’s thinking, design philosophy and the journey he took to create Sunsynk and its development. Key Takeaways Kieth is a certified Electrical Engineer Sunsynk started in marine outfitting mainstream shipping and yachts. South Africa is marked as a major market Sunsynk is over 10 years old Sunsynk is developing large scale inverters up to 100kw with imbalance modes Parallel up to 15 Sunsynks together
    10 points
  6. used to have a Fronius 20 kw 3 phase inverter with 26 x 305 watt panels upgrade = 3 x 5kw Sunsync with extra 9 x 390 watt panels (total of 35 panels = 11 440 watt) and 3 x Hubble 5.5 kw batteries work in progress thank you Leshen, Steve and team
    9 points
  7. Leshen

    Sunsynk 8kw Inverter

    Hi Guys. My new installation. 24 x 390w JA Mono solar panels with an 8kw Sunsynk inverter and 2 x 5kwh Bull Lithium batteries. More pics to follow soon...
    8 points
  8. Leshen

    Hubble AM2

    Good day. For those Hubble owners who are keen to know what the AM2 looks like on the inside. BYD cells are laser welded together. See attached picture. PS, please don’t open your batteries for any reason as the warranty will be void.
    8 points
  9. Busy with a 3 phase installation with 3 x 5kw Sunsynk and 3 Hubble’s. Will post pictures when it’s complete.
    8 points
  10. Hello All. To celebrate passing the 10k user mark we will be having a give away to the value of R4900 to a randomly selected active forum member. This will happen on Monday. Stay Tuned! Sincerely Jay
    8 points
  11. In December 2020, I unfortunately fell victim to a lightning surge from the grid. Various items in my house was impacted. Thankfully my Axpert inverters(x2) survived with no issues, although the Raspberry Pi that runs ICC was effected, Pi booted but USB and network ports dead. My Pylontech bank(5 x US2000 Plus) was impacted as well. The communication ports(console, RS485, CAN etc) was impacted on all 5 Pylontech modules. Fortunately they were still charging and discharging normally but i could not get any info from them. I sent them back to the supplier to get a full report. The report stated that the CMU boards in all 5 modules had to be replaced and Pylontech warranty does not cover surges, so I had to claim from insurance. Got all approvals and all boards were replaced. I commissioned the entire bank after the repairs was done. After a few days I was noticing that 2 modules cell voltages was going over 3.65v during charge and these units were throwing High Voltage and Over voltage errors in the logs. When this happens, it stopped accepting any current and waits for those effected cells voltages to drop below 3.5v before accepting a charge again. This happened over a few days and the SOH counts were increasing for these 2 modules. I decided to pull them out of the bank and to my surprise they were swollen! I was actually was shocked(no pun) when I saw this. I returned those 2 modules back to the supplier and there new report concluded that the cells are damaged from the surge and irrepairable. Their recommendation was to replace those 2 modules, which i did with a US3000C and a US2000. I collected the damaged modules and in the spirit of science, being inquisitive and sharing knowledge I decided to salvage some parts before disposing the cells. I took the following pics: Bottom cover off, we can see 3 x 16v battery packs(notice them being swollen), connected in series. Power Management Unit(PMU) board on the bottom left and Communication Management Unit(CMU) on the bottom right. PMU Top: PMU Bottom, notice all the MOSFETS here.... this side of the board is attached to a heatsink situated on the front right top side of an installed module: CMU Top: CMU Bottom: LED Strip: Internal power cable size 8AWG - 10mm2: Battery Packs: If you counted, there are 10 pouches per pack. A total of 30 pouches in a single US2000 Plus module, equates to 1.6v per pouch. BatteryView software shows 15 cells, so i am guessing that 2 pouches make up a cell of 3.2v. Enjoy the pics.
    8 points
  12. Hi Community, Seems the forum is decending into just degrading brands and negative commenting which is very unfortunate, as the powerforum is a great wealth of knowledge for power backup and solar enthusiasts. We're not dodging questions, we dont live on this forum, and we are not affiliated to powerforum. Seems if we dont answer questions immediately then there are negative views. We only check this forum once a week if that. If you have questions please contact us through our official channels or on our website contact form. For support and technical questions please contact us direct through our official channels, we will be more than happy to assist our clients.
    8 points
  13. Thank you @Leshen for the time and effort put into my installation. It may be entry level but I'm really excited. Excellent workmanship from your team and so knowledgeable. I am staring down the rabbit hole now.. thanks lol! Even got my generator to work with the system.. outstanding! I would never hesitate to recommend Leshen if you are looking into going the inverter/solar route. There are just too many companies/people out there who claim to know what they are doing but just want to make a quick buck and not have the required knowledge or expertise to put an efficient system together nor listen to what their client needs. Next step.. another AM-2 and then solar panels
    7 points
  14. Faced with the costs of "Wonder Gadgets" to heat water from excess solar availability, I have come up with a different way of doing it.... I have already had, for some time now, a raspberry pi hooked to my inverter monitoring and controlling various bits and bobs around the place... One of my greatest frustrations is the "lost solar" power that is often available during the average day.... This hot water system but one small addition I have made to try and utilize this unused power. I put in an order to a local (EL) company for a triple 220V geyser element. It wasn't as pricey as I expected. The 3 elements are 500W/750W/1000W respectively, all on a single screw in, standard fitting (with an extra long thermostat pocket as well, which reaches well beyond the ends of the elements.). The long and the short of it is, using my pi/mqtt/fabricobbled system, I can get a pretty close estimate of what inverter/solar power is available beyond the immediate consumption at any given point in time... Using a small "Sonoff" wifi switch, hot wired to a quad 10A relay board, a bit of Node-Red and some head scratching, the net result is, well fantastic! If there's 500W excess available, turn on the 500W element... Same for 750/1kw.... Need more? Turn them on in combination, to step in 8 steps, 0W to 2.25Kw as needed... The extra deep pocket for the thermostat got a Sonoff with a DS18B20 temp sensor to feed info back into the mqtt as well.... (Yep, you can series the elements as well with a bit more head scratching to lower the wattages still further, but lower than 500W is a waste of time as I have found out...) Safety? Sure... Using the existing Thermostat pocket in the geyser, there's a good old fashioned clicky-clicky rod slotted in... Hooked up to the common neutral of the 3 elements... If he's unhappily hot, everybody shuts down... And... It works... Well! Total cost of the additional bits was less than ZAR1K, its been running for about 6 months now and barring some really crappy weather, the household of 4 has used very little gas in the geyser system over the period... Cheerz... E
    7 points
  15. Installation completed.
    7 points
  16. YellowTapemeasure

    Oh No!

    Yes, you are. Firstly, I'm no leftist libertarian, and I am not going to apologise for it, or for thinking the way that I do. In my own case, I have, at my own expense, and using my own (after taxation) money, purchased, installed and paid VAT on infrastructure that will relieve Eskom from their mandate (and until recently monopoly as a sole supplier) to supplying the daily 10kWh that it used to supply me with, sporadically and whenever whenever they felt like it. Their power supply was so erratic and unreliable and I wasn't able to generate any form of reliable income stream working from home. Their inability to fulfill their legislative mandate, I might add, is no fault of my own. The outcome is that as of today, I am able to provide a far more reliable power supply than Eskom, and I do it both day AND night, so Eskom's argument that I am "...forcing them to ramp up power at a faster rate at night" is total rubbish at best and completely economical with the truth . The truth is exactly the other way around. It is because of their inability (for whatever reasons, there are many which I will not go into here) to run a decent utility, (which BTW was at one stage considered the most efficient in the world, notwithstanding the fact that they had a monopoly on supply), that I have had to dig into my own pocket to provide energy for myself. I have incurred personal capital expenditure, and I am faced with current and future maintenance costs for infrastructure which I have, at my own volition, installed in order to meet my needs (to be a productive citizen!?). I am the one taking the risk of a long-term investment (15+ years just to break even) in something that I doubt that I will ever see a return on. In doing so, however, I have relieved them of their duty to supply my home with that 10kWh per day, which, due to their (self-inflicted) shortage, they can distribute and supply to the many in need. For that, I think that at the very least, I (and all the other home solar power users) actually deserve a big "thank you". In fact, Eskom should actually go on its hands and knees to thank home and business solar power owners, for their fortitude, their investment, their long-term commitment to this country, and their ability and bravery to get involved in something which is not their core competency, and which actually helps Eskom deliver (whatever) service (is left) to those less fortunate. Instead, Eskom decides that we are the enemy, and punishes us with additional taxation An interesting strategy
    7 points
  17. Just installed a Sunsynk 8kw inverter DIY and want to share some info. We use about 1000kwh (units) per month in our house so about 33 per day with about half in the day and half after PV hours. This is about average for a family home I recon in SA. Already have 2 Solar geysers, gas plates and all lights LED. I wanted to be independent from the grid as much as possible which weighed heavier than economics although my return is still acceptable and higher after tax than any risk free investment. The whole house runs through the inverter including oven, the solar geyser AC elements, all plugs etc. Only the 4 Aircons is supplied before the inverter but with the Sunsynk CT which fit over the supply line the inverter will push electricity to them too if sufficient PV and battery power are available. I have one normal plug before inverter for if I have to weld or use heavy machinery. I Installed: Sunsynk 8kw Brilliant inverter easy to do DIY and with help from Powerforum posts. Jinko Mono Cheetah 400w panels * 18 - Connected in 2 series - 9 each. 9 panels in series match perfectly, max voltage around 410V real life in October (Sunsynk specs max 450V) and producing 97% of rated panel watts (3500w per string) max. Fitted on aluminium rails on tile roof. Fitting the brackets under tiles is quite a job got my son to do that. 6mm PV cable running in PVC conduit from panels to inverter. One set is facing West and the other facing North. I think if you can get East and west facing panels that is ideal, as you need PV power early in the morning to charge low batteries and then you want to produce as late as possible in the afternoon to have full batteries going into evening. Although not the ideal orientation PV panels are cheaper than additional batteries. Pylontech US3000 * 5 These batteries when 100% charged at 5pm run the whole house through the night (have about 20 outside lights 3 pc's etc) and start to charge at 6am from west panels on around 30% SOC in October. By 11:30 am the batteries are normally 100% charged, then I boost the geysers through Geyserwise on free electricity to increase their temperature so that they are still warm in the morning. PV protection DB with fuses, surge arrestors and DC isolators. Fuse and isolator between Batteries and Inverter Grounding ROD and all earth wiring. AC CB and change over switch etc in AC DB with relay for earth neutral bond Total cost about R 210 000 (ex own labour) except for heavy overcast days I am not using any power from Tshwane, bill was about R1800-R2000 per month. The feeling when the kettle and iron etc are on during the day and you know that it is not costing you anything (yes i know it is kinda) is priceless.
    7 points
  18. Hi Dreaming about solar... not because of Escom, but because it's cool stuff. Never got so far to make the jump. The >100K always found another place where it was spend (sometimes on very big white elephants). Today, I made the dive and transferred the payment of my first solar system. (With luck on my side, I will be dead before the panels read their end of life) Sunsynk 8 6.4 BSL Bull JA Solar 405 Mono's and all the other related goodiest A very big thank you to the guys from Power Forum Store for the good prices, good courier costs and excellent service. I will start a post on my build so that other can see how a newbie tries to figure out all this nice goodies.
    7 points
  19. JayBee

    Y.A.S.H.I.

    Yet Another Sunsynk Hubble Install. Consisting of: 12 * 535W JA solar panels 1 * 8kW Sunsynk 2 * Hubble AM-2 and lots and lots of wiring and installation work. Panels are on a smallish section of roof on the 2nd story and inverter is in a detached garage. Old house with lots of challenges... and the dark shot: Installation by @Leshen and I'm super happy. I've been constantly checking my solarman app and attempting to adjust my usage to daytime as much as possible which has actually been quite fun. It's great seeing the panels getting used instead of the grid
    6 points
  20. Hi @Joe Moer, Here is the main info screen I use on the cell phone, a little truncated, but its just status lights that are cut off at the bottom of the page: And a similar content, but different layout when viewed on PC: The setup has got quite involved, with parameters specifically written for each "main" piece of kit on the system: Certain pieces of kit are SOC controlled, others are controlled by availability of sunlight power, others are solar timed and more often than not, a combination the available options is used to get the best/most out of what energy is available at any given moment - There are also a couple of cute little things I have incorporated to keep the loads below the nominal 3kw mark - This isn't out of necessity, but I am not wild about inverter wear and tear mounting up (It can handle 5kw with a 10kw surge, plus I have a 2nd that I can parallel it with if I need to, but why should I, if I can keep loads in tow automatically?).. One of these tricks is that when a heavy load turns on by available power, other loads are turned off... ie when the dishwasher hits the 2kw heating cycle, deep freeze, air compressor etc are barred from starting and if they are running, they are shut down immediately until the high demand is over.... Here below is a fairly complex parameter screen, namely for the DeepFreeze - It has 3 temperature bands based on day/night and excess power availability, with the option of offsetting day and night times depending on your needs, it also takes care of power failures, checking the SOC and economising power usage when there is no mains power to fall back onto by shifting to the "night temperature" bandwidth... (Oh yes, the system is both Lead Acid and LiFe friendly, with control being selectable from either SOC or Battery Voltage governing...): Amongst other features (beyond just turning on fridges, pumps, compressors and washing machines etc) that I have written into the system are: Luminescence detection (used for determining maximum solar power availability on the fly) SOC control based on reported SOC from inverter OR direct SOC from the Pylon batteries(with 4x Pylons in the system, SOC switching can be fine tuned to within .25%) Monitoring of Inverter Output and the ability to warn users of heavy usage Switching of Inverter modes, be it charger source or inverter mode proper remotely Setting of utility charge current remotely Automatic security lighting based on SOC and solar timers Water preheating based on excess power availability, this heated water is then fed into gas geysers for final heating if required - 8 stage multi load purely resistive element, temperature and power availability controlled... System messaging and control via Telegram alerts to control remotely as well as be notified of urgent system items. Telegram control of external Lighting Control of auto start diesel generator - This only starts when there is a mains failure and batteries are nearing depletion - The system then puts the inverter into eco mode, switches to utility and solar charging, sets the charge current, then monitors SOC until it is within bounds... It then shuts the gennie down, switches to battery, sets charge/inverter/everything back to "normal" mode... (All modes, currents, SOC's etc are user configurable) 433mhz(keeloq) remote key fob control for security lighting or whatever grabs my fancy (currently only controlling lighting but can be easily expanded to turn on equipment as I need) - this is specific to remote control fob user, per button or combination of remote buttons pressed.... Timer controlled "smart charger" - if load shedding is scheduled, and SOC is a bit low to carry through due to inclement weather, there is a "smart charger mode" that can be timer enabled to charge the batteries prior to the shed happening - Modes etc are similar to the auto start gennie enviro, but take advantage of the lower cost of mains charging rather than diesel charging if possible (automatically going back to preset running inverter defaults once the event is past)... Along with probably a hell of a lot more that doesn't spring to mind at the moment! @lupasha - All of this is ostensibly wifi based, running on either Tasmotized Sonoffs or custom written 8266 wifi units... As to Home Assistant, I am clueless - this is all running running on a pi4-4gb with a 16gb mem card that is hooked to my inverter, running Node Red as a controller enviro with all the dangly bits reporting in via MQTT(Mosquitto) - CPU usage on the Pi4 hovers around 20 to 30%, so it is far from stressed... Data collection and trending is done with EmonCMS, only because I started with it a few years back and haven't had a chance to redo the front end under an Influx/Grafana environment... Cheers Ed
    6 points
  21. hoohloc

    Powerforum Giveaway

    Just received my gift today and so excited to give it a try. Thank you powerforum
    6 points
  22. Ian

    Oh No!

    All I can see is this accelerating migration to off-grid, which will just make their situation worse. They are in such a mess:(
    6 points
  23. Hi Guss Welcome to the world of solar power. A world where you can turn lights on at any time you choose. A world where nobody else dictates when you can do a washing load. A world where you never have to miss your favorite show..... This is the best decision you have ever made. We don’t worry about load shedding, we make our own power!! If you need any advice on anything, we are ALL here to help.
    6 points
  24. Leshen

    Sunsynk/Hubble Install

    Two x 8kw Sunsynk Hybrid Inverters with 4 x Hubble AM2 with 36 x 535w JA Solar panels.
    5 points
  25. 5 points
  26. Justipoohs

    Real life Solar

    I recently restored an old farmhouse in the Kalahari just outside Upington NC. I rebuild the house with solar power in mind, but was a little scared of the assumed cost. I must point out that if I was going Solar I wanted to go 100% solar as just the standing charge on the Eskom pole is R850 per month. Anyway, earlier this year I decide to take the plunge. The house is three bed, dining room, living room, kitchen, large stoep and a granny flat. We also work from home full time. We have a gas geyser for hot water and a gas range and oven to cook. In the summer, and it's a hell of a summer in the Kalahari we use an evaporator cooler. I did the calculations over and over again for daily kW used but still it only came to 3kw. So on that basis I installed 4x305w panels, a 3kw inverter and two 200ah gel batteries. Cost R28000 So we run a fridge freezer, a chest freezer, 2 x TV, microwave (just for re heat max 5min) lighting, washing machine 1xload per day, charge phones, laptops and the internet modem, pressure pump for the house water and evaporator. We have not noticed the difference between Eskom and solar, the batteries seem to use 30% overnight. My takeaway is that if you are prepared to look at alternatives to Electric stoves/ovens, and electric geysers and foresake aircon for evaporation then off grid solar need not be an expensive proposition.
    5 points
  27. Sunsynk 5KW with hubble AM-2. 6 x 380w JA Solar panels, will add more at a later stage. Solar export to Grid function on the Sunsynk was tested and works beautifully.
    5 points
  28. Hi Powerforum Group, Herewith a short video of the new RIOT features coming in the next week. Remote Axpert control through the cloud. More features will be deployed soon. Next will be Sunsynk monitoring and control dashboard.
    5 points
  29. Sunsynk 8kw inverter user here for the last 11 months and I really can't fault it. It just works and there are constant upgrades and improvements. My inverter mppt was only 18A but they confirmed that it does support 22A and they upgraded my firmware overnight. Very happy with this inverter. The user interface is also very easy to understand but the settings does have a bit of a learning curve to it. There are many users here that can assist with the settings though. I don't think there's an inverter with a better user interface than the sunsynk with its touch screen display. There is a new logger that's currently in beta testing that allows for real time remote monitoring and changing of inverter settings. I'm not sure when it's going to be released.
    5 points
  30. I have just completed my solar setup, after several months of planning and purchasing, and I must say, I am very happy with the results! My system: 1x Axpert 7,2kW Inverter 14x Canadian Solar 435W panels 2x US3000C batteries 1x Raspberry Pi running ICC This includes all of the relevant protection boxes etc. I have spent the past week completing the installation, and now that all of the hardware is in, the tweaking of all of the settings and timing etc. can begin! A nice surprise being that the unit seems to work as a "semi-hybrid". While in grid mode, it is able to make use of PV to supplement loads, but it isn't a complete hybrid, in that it only makes use of batteries and solar when in "solar mode" I have been running off-grid since Saturday morning and couldn't be happier! I will need to add another battery at a later stage, as I'm presently not making full benefit of the available PV, despite running my pool pump and geysers during the course of the day. The current 2 batteries just gets me through the night, but we are being mindful of what equipment we are using after hours - an additional battery would really help here - will need to first wait for a few more pay days (don't want my wife to kill me!)
    5 points
  31. Battery backup solution for a client who wanted an 8kw Sunsynk with a Hubble AM2. Inverter is limited to 95A discharge which is below the 100A on the battery so the inverter will protect the battery before the BMS has to.
    5 points
  32. Looked at it all, and not just the paperwork and stuff which is an overload for just a household consumer... At the end of the day I am not going to pay any new premium to the Municipality or Eskom. I have operated almost off-grid for almost 3 years without an issue, so my choice is to disconnect my Grid power. I am going to have to get some additional equipment (since my wifes business involves baking), but we have not used Grid power for 3 years even with her business, and so far no major issues as long as we keep our power draw within spec. I have applied to eThekwini to disconnect our power (this seems to confuse the few callers I have had), and had stupid people tell me about a R15k charge to disconnect - I just read the municipal bylaws straight back at them and they stop talking. After 4 weeks, I still can't get disconnected, even though I have switched off their mains. Tried to charge me for estimated usage of 11Kw last month which I refused. It is a fight to go off-grid, but if you are sure your system and backups can do it, then keep fighting and don't let a municipality or Eskom force you into a position, With eThekwini connection, my monthly cost is approx R1800. Without it should drop to R1200. I am also busy with Water costs as I have 2 Jojo's for seperate use and use less than 1kL from eThekwini. If I manage this right I may be able to cut this off too (especially since our usage is less than 200l/person/day) Some municipal bills I still have to pay (with "long teeth" in afrikaans)... Sewerage disposal, Garbage Disposal, and Rates. But everything other than Rates, can be reduced to almost nothing, and they aren't that expensive anyway. My end game here is just to tell you all that you can get out of Eskom/Municipal costs, but you have to do it when your house is ready... Don't blindly say "f*cuk Eskom". You need to work it all out like you would a business decision to get the best outcome for your own environment. You might be a small consumer, but it can't hut to ask your municipality for a better price... After all they offer that to many businesses, and if you get the right operator, they may do the same for you.
    5 points
  33. Ok, people, my vote is for no registration or licensing required, unless you feed into the grid, if all you are doing is supplementing commercial power with your own, or even run off the grid, it should have no requirements. As for being a producer of power... the problem is, that if you need to feed into the grid, the line voltage will rise and this, if everyone in your neighbourhood wants to do this, can end up with 300V on a 220V circuit, which some equipment may not be all that happy with, then a cloud comes over/the wind stops and all the power being produced disappears and the utility is up the creek and the 300V turns into 180V as all the consumers pull instead of push power... it is not as simple as some may try and make it sound, that we are being ripped off by Eskom and the grid tied municipalities goes without saying, but since they have run the infrastructure into bad shape & all, it probably is best to consider doing them the favour of lightening the load and disconnecting from the grid. At least until such time as they get their issues sorted and produce reliable power at a more reasonable rate and don't charge for everything else that is really included in the energy charge, separately, but is a great way of adding more fees and make it sound no too unreasonable. Service and Administration Charge Network Capacity Charge Network Demand Charge Anciliiary service charge Energy charge Wait, you forgot to add the drinks and hookers charge...
    5 points
  34. I have been trying to make sense of this post. Please help. I assume that the 5M you refer to is 5MW (megawatt). I assume that 40M is in fact 40m (metres), and 8M is 8m. I further assume that the 605W you refer to is a 605W panel. The only one I can find is a Jinko RS600M-120HC - they measure 2172mm x 1303mm. You could fit a theoretical maximum of 113 into an area 40m x 8m if you packed them without gaps to avoid shading, more like 40% of that in practice. "Easily 120" would be a stretch - perhaps I have misunderstood you? By 7.2 KWhr I assume that you mean 7.2kWh. I do not understand that - 120 x 605W would be about 72kW. (Expressing power output in kWh makes no sense unless you attach a time dimension to it.) Did you mean to say 7.2kW? If so it should have been 72kW. So, (making many assumptions) is this what you were trying to say? "I have a space of 40m x 8m where I could fit in 72kW of PV using 120 x 605W panels". It would not be quite true, but OK. Forgive me if I am being too pedantic, but there are many people who read these forums who are not technically educated - the conversation will be more easily understood by all if we so not each invent our own abbreviations.
    5 points
  35. Leshen

    Pylontech vs Hubble

    Good day guys. Just a quick post with some pictures on what the popular Pylontech batteries look like on the inside vs the latest Hubble battery. Big difference on the quality. Some corrosion already occuring on the Pylontech. Hubble has BYD NMC prismatic cells and its 1C.
    5 points
  36. A very good post. What I have been trying to create for the past 8 years is for installers to register that have their clients best interest at heart. A good installer should charge his fair share but for a fair price. Too long have I seen installers doing half jobs and more importantly not educating the client regarding maintenance and life time of battery's etc. Yes the forum has a store. It is not and will not ever be my intention to take over all business- we welcome all reputable suppliers. Since 2013 I have wanted to create a safe space for clients to make informed decisions and feel that the forum is helping them achieve that and has their back as we have done due diligence on all our registered manufacturers and installers. We are busy listing very reputable manufacturers and soon hope for installers to sign up. I want this forum to be a platform that members can trust and use any supplier of their choice knowing that they are reputable. I feel the time of dodgey installers taking clients hard earned money and providing poor service will come to an end very soon. I too have been victim to this treatment. The market is changing to that of informed clients! Sincerely Jay
    5 points
  37. calypso

    Pylontech vs Hubble

    If I were Hubble I would would pay Leshen to stop posting. Literally destroying the reputation of a up and coming brand talking smack. Unfortunately for now, the damage is already done.
    5 points
  38. A very interesting topic here and happy to put my two cents in. I have my own opinions of Pylontech batteries, this is not the platform to air them though. I prefer to make sure that people can get a better understanding of the products they purchase. We supply and I do the support for the BSL battery, what you have all come to know as the Bull Battery, and I am involved heavily behind the scenes with the battery and manufacture of it. A few of you I recognise as people I have actually dealt with and personally helped in setting up systems with the BSL's. We can guarantee the battery in our efforts to always improve and maintain a very high standard when it comes to the product. BSL has made sure that not only is the product of a high standard, but also that the after market service is always available, giving you peace of mind that there is always support when needed. The BSL's BMS is robust, heavily tested and our efforts to make sure of comms capabilities gives us a little edge over some of the others in the market. No battery is ever perfect and they all have their pros and cons, but those manufacturers who put in the effort to better their product continuously will always be a better option than companies who give you something they say works and don't offer anything further than that. Over the past six months that I have been involved with the BSL, I have seen the engineering and updating of the batteries first hand, watching them evolve and advance with the more we learn. Learning is a key aspect of the process and giving the best is always the goal. We always maintain the ability to replace any part of our batteries if the need so arises, so that aspect is taken care of. As for cycle life on batteries, please don't use this as a given on any battery. No manufacturer can tell you exactly what their battery will do over ten, fifteen or even twenty years, not in a market that is so new in comparison to other markets who have been around for far longer. The biggest problem is that people expect electrical engineers to tell you what chemical engineers actually know.... So there is still much learning and the future will be even more interesting. The BSL is rated to 5000 cycles at 80% DOD and comes with a ten year warranty as standard, but the design life is actually 20 years and the cells will obviously last accordingly to your usage and exertion on the battery, as with any battery. I will be doing some testing on other locally available batteries, I am very keen to see what the market has to offer and how they all compare, this is one of the goals we have for this year. As for Pylontech, they have their place in the market and they aren't going anywhere soon, just bare in mind that companies such as Hubble and BSL are always making advancements and they offer the local support which you won't get from some other big brand names. Hope you all walk away with something from this thread today
    5 points
  39. A post yesterday reminded me to check the linked site for recent firmware files. I had not looked for over a year, and found 3 recent firmwares there. One of them is removable display firmware 02.60: https://www.ostrovni-elektrarny.cz/support/Axpert/FW/RemotePanel_Reflash_MCU(02.60).rar This is listed as an Axpert King firmware, but I'm guessing that it would also work with Axpert VM III main firmware version 91.20, also on that site: https://www.ostrovni-elektrarny.cz/support/Axpert/FW/VMIII_Ver91.20.7z The removable display firmware adds another BMS type, LIC. There was for a long time type LIB, which I thought might have stood for LIBrary, but now it looks like it stands for LIthium type B and LIthium type C. There is also an Axpert Max 7200 W main firmware version 90.11 there: https://www.ostrovni-elektrarny.cz/support/Axpert/FW/MAX7200_Main_CNTL_DSP_90.11.7z .
    5 points
  40. Bobster

    Happy New Year

    I don't think I know anybody who had a good 2020, but I do hope there are better things ahead for 2021. I have enjoyed this forum this year, and have learned from the helpful, knowledgeable members. I hope next year is better for y'all. At least you will be able to keep the lights on.
    5 points
  41. Leshen

    Sunsynk 8kw Inverter

    For those of you who doubt the Sunsynk 8.8kw inverter, here are some figures of what I produced today. This outclasses Victron by far!
    5 points
  42. Beat

    Axpert radio interferences

    Success ! The radio interference is gone. I improved the inductance and added some capacitors. In order to run several turns trough the ferrite core I went to the motor and transformer winding shop to get some 6mm² winding wire. But they don’t have such. We finally agreed on 2mm² wire that I would use in 3 wire bundles. I bought 10m of it (R40). I also went to the electronic shop to buy 4 0.33µF 310V capacitors (R40). I first thought to have one core for each polarity. But then I realized that the 30A PV current could saturate the core and reduce the inductance. So I decided to run both polarities trough the same core. The two magnetic fields would then cancel each other and prevent saturation. I managed to run each polarity 3 times trough the core. Since the core can be opened it is easy to wind each half separately. I separated the polarities with a piece of card board. One challenge was to strip the 12 wire ends of the tough isolation varnish. The outgoing bundles are hold together with shrinking tubes. I tightened the two half cores together with a strong cable tie to prevent a gap between the core halves. The finished winding is shown in picture below. I had many thoughts how to connect capacitors to the 48V M6 terminals. I finally found the solution shown below. I soldered the capacitor leads to 6X22 washers with a 60W soldering iron. The washers are then installed under the M6 nuts of the terminals. The final installation of inductance and capacitors is shown in picture below. The outgoing leads of the inductance are directly wired to the PV input terminals together with the leads of the capacitors. I had to solder little pieces of installation wire to the capacitors leads because the terminals would not clamp the tiny wire of the capacitors. The other ends are crimped to the earth wire.
    5 points
  43. Web interface sorted. I can now remotely alter my inverter settings. Next I want to integrate the settings into my automation flows. This would essentially allow me to run two seperate sets of settings, Loadshedding vs No loadshedding. The load shedding settings can be triggered by a webhook and will ensure that the battery charging is prioritized when loadshedding is active.
    5 points
  44. Good afternoon Tsa As per SANS 10142:2006 the maximum allowable current for PVC insulated cables in a single phase installation when the cable is enclosed in conduit fixed to a wall or trunking fixed to a wall are as follows. For Multi-Phase the currents are lower. For GP cable - That is the individual Black, Red, Blue, White, Yellow, Yellow and Green cables which are not bundled together with a second insulation over the individual cores and with 1 solid core or multiple thick strands 1.5 mm2: 17.5A, 2.5 mm2: 24A, 4.0 mm2: 32A, 6.0 mm2: 41A, 10.0 mm2: 57A, 16.0 mm2: 76A, 25.0 mm2: 101A For Surfix and Twin and Earth - A cable with more than 1 cores with 1 solid core or multiple thick strands individually insulated with a second insulation over the individual cores 1.5 mm2: 16.5A, 2.5 mm2: 23A, 4.0 mm2: 30A, 6.0 mm2: 38A, 10.0 mm2: 52A, 16.0 mm2: 69A, 25.0 mm2: 90A The maximum cable operating temperature are not allowed to exceed 70 degree Celsius, if the temperature exceeds 70 degree Celsius a thicker cable must be used. Cabtyre -A flexible cable with thin strands used for appliances, power tools, extension leads etc are not allowed in a DB. The gap between the clamp of the MCB and the start of the insulation may not exceed 2mm. There is also a limit of the number of cables entering or leaving an MCB and that limit is 3. Another point that is misunderstood is that the MCB protects the cable and not the load supplied by the cable. If a cable leaving the DB is joined and the cable that is joined is thicker or thinner than the other cable then the MCB must be rated for the thinner cable, for example a gate motor is to be installed and the cable leaving the house is 2.5 mm2 but you cannot get a 2.5 mm2 cable only 1.5 mm2 is available then the MCB must be rated for the 1.5mm2 cable. Circuits are not allowed to be mixed on the MCB's eg Lights and Socket outlets on the same MCB. Open spaces in the cover of the DB must be closed off so that you are protected from a electric shock and to keep insects, bugs, spiders, bees and wasps out of the DB. MCB's must be marked with indelible ink or a proper label which is not easily removed. If a DB is supplied by another DB then the sub DB and the supplying DB must be properly marked the same way MCB's are marked. A Switch Dis-connector (isolator) must disconnect both L & N for single phase installations and all P's & N for multi-phase installations. A 2 pole or 4 pole MCB are not allowed to be used as a switch dis-connector (isolator). A MCB must trip all P's for multi-phase installations if there is a over current in any of the phases. An Earth leakage must disconnect both L & N for single phase installations and all P's & N for multi-phase installations PS CB is short for Miniature Circuit Breaker.
    5 points
  45. #Please use relevant template for your sale/wanted threads #Remove any part with a # tag in front before posting #For Sale Template Item: Age: Price: Payment Method Accepted: Warranty: Packaging: Condition: Location: Reason: Shipping: Collection: Link: #Wanted Template Item Wanted: Packaging Essential: Desired Age: Location: Willing to accept a shipped item: Ballpark/Budget Amount:
    4 points
  46. Chris Hobson

    Starting again

    Hi All After a period of absence I am back without my much loved dual Axpert install. I now lived in (clears his throat) Gqeberha (Port Elizabeth for those of you without a throat infection). My new home has a 3 phase supply and a massive 30 kVA 3P generator for the regular power outages. Heaven help us once loadshedding starts. The roof is slate and probably singularly unsuitable for a PV install. Not to be defeated I do see there is space for a double carport which will then accommodate PV on the roof. At this stage I am looking at a Solis 3P GTI. Anyone have a system that they find superb? Chris
    4 points
  47. Hi P1000, First of all interesting post. We have been following it and not commenting as to stay neutral. Regarding spares. - BMS: Our BMS units are manufactured in the East and they are double coated to prevent corrosion. The BMS have been approved for Telecomms and datacentres and has CE approval etc. We have 2 service centres, JHB and CT. We order a 5% spare holding over the required minimum for BMS units per container. We currently have local spares of BMS units in JHB & CT. To date we have not had a BMS fail. We have had LCD display issues on 2 batteries but we swapped out the screen. We currently have over 60 spare full BMS boards available with more spares arriving monthly. The BMS we use can deliver 150Amps continuous output and input. Our AM-2 batteries are set to deliver up to 120Amp output per battery. The BMS is over specced for what we use, but we prefer this as the components run cooler, this is why we have not had a BMS failure in any unit so far. The problem with overspeccing the BMS is all the component prices increase and cables are bigger, so cost increase is a factor. - Cells: We have spare cells that we can swap out with our units, but you also have to condition the cells and give them a top up charge every 6-8 months so they do not undervoltage and get damaged. To date we have not replaced any cells. If there is a issue we swap the full battery pack out if its new or there is issues within a week after install etc. We also do not want to overcapatalise on older cells as the technology is moving very fast and cells get more energy dense every year. Hope that helps.
    4 points
  48. Hi Hagu13. I have been running Pylon us2000b(x4) + us3000b (x2) for around 20 months now and my battery bank currently reports a 98% state of health (SOH). If this rate of degradation remains linear then after 10 years, theoretically the battery bank should retain 80 to 90% SOH. For the 3 months of winter I drain my battery bank down to 30% state of charge (SOC). I stop at 30% as I cannot fully charge the battery bank from PV the next day if I go any lower. If I had more panel power I would be comfortable taking the battery bank down to 20% daily for the 3 months of winter. During summer the battery bank typically only drops to around 60% SOC by the time the sun rises and then is back at 100% by around 12h00 on a sunny day. Summer plot Winter plot (24% SOC on this day and just missed getting back to 100%) I run the entire house (2x geysers, pool pump, fish pond pump, cooking (no gas), air conditioning units for heating & cooling the home (30000BTU total)) off of the PV and battery storage.
    4 points
  49. Had some time today to add the battery charge/discharge info. Also moved things around a bit to make sense for me See updated Grafana JSON and new Solar Sketch with added battery charge discharge code. Power Monitor-1600266455741.json rev1_02_amps_volts_temp__hum_batdisscharge_charge.ino
    4 points
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