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  1. Hi guys, Just wanted to present to you a new Windows' software tool that we prepared for monitoring of PIP/Axpert inverters and Pylontech batteries. It supports many compatible inverter models. It can work with parallel configurations as well. This was actually the main reason to write the software because a few months ago I upgraded my system from single to 3x inverters and the "pi" solution did not work correct anymore. The software can control switching between battery/grid mode based on Pylontech SOC, and also can control Pylontech max charge current based on the request coming from its BMS. The software can also upload data to emoncms server. Currently the software has only basic reporting, but all inverter/pylon data is stored in local database and we intend to add more reporting options in future. We also added a "console" screen where users can manually send commands to Inverters and Pylontech. The communication with inverters is by USB or RS232 connection. In parallel setups each inverter should be connected with separate cable. I chose this method because reading parallel data from a single inverter is highly inaccurate and slow (at least in the setups where we tested). The Pylontech batteries can be connected by RS232 (console port) or RS485 (to the dedicated RS485 port). You can download the software at http://www.multisibcontrol.net . It is absolutely free now.
    12 points
  2. PierreJ

    Victron DIY Install

    Got the sign-off from CoCT about a month ago, so my DIY solar project is finally done and dusted. Thanks to everyone on the forum that provided advice - I probably would have stuffed it up if it wasn't for you. The whole project took about three months of evenings and weekends to finish, and was a welcome distraction from the current state of the world. 4 strings of 4 Canadian Solar 400Wp poly panels in series, facing NNE. Another string of 4 Canadian Solar 400Wp panels in series, facing WNW. All five strings are paralleled together for a combined 8kWp. This is my main DB. CoCT installed a new split prepaid meter. According to the technician that installed it it has built-in reverse power blocking. I have tested it to see what it does when I try to feed in power in to the grid, and it charges me in both directions. That is perfectly fine in my opinion - much preferable to it tripping when there is momentary feed-in. Grid power is measured by an ET112. There is a breaker that connects the main DB to the solar installation in the scullery: Top-left is the AC DB. Top-right is the DC combiner box. Bottom left is the Multiplus II 5kVA inverter, and bottom middle the SmartSolar 250/100 MPPT. The SmartSolar was initially running a bit hot for my liking, so I mounted it on a 6mm thick aluminium plate which brought down peak temperatures from 82C to 65C. Bottom-right is the Victron Cerbo. The battery cabinet on the floor contains 5 PylonTech US2000 batteries for a total nominal capacity of 12kWh. I've set it to 80% DoD: Close-up of the DC buses. Close-up of the AC DB, with and without cover. Close-up of the DC combiner box, with and without cover. The geyser and oven, as well as the swimming pool DB are connected to the main DB, so those are unpowered when there is loadshedding. The AC DB in the scullery is connected to the output of the Multiplus, so all the essential loads stay powered when grid power goes down.
    11 points
  3. Good day All, Over the past couple of months I have received numerous requests to share my NodeRed flows used for monitoring the status of the SunSynk inverter. My initial idea was to package all of the flows into an easy to use package and user interface, however my work loads have not provided me the luxury of time to play around and make it a fool proof system. Please note that the use of these flows are at your own discretion with no liability to either myself, this site nor any members of this site. Do not attempt implement these flows if you are unfamiliar with the working of the ModBus protocol or basic programming. Brief overview of the flows: LoadShedStatus - This flow determines the loadshedding status through a webscraper. I use this information to trigger a secondary set of settings to the inverter in case of load shedding. ModBusRead - This flow is responsible for reading information from the Inverter via the Modbus Flex getter ModBusWrite - This flow is responsible for writing settings back to the inverter via the Modbus flex getter Inverter Monitoring - This flow is responsible for obtaining all of the inverter monitoring values. The values are then send to Home Asssistant via MQTT as well as logged to an InfluxDB for monitoring via Grafana SSFormRead - This flow reads the current system settings from the inverter and display it via the NodeRed UI SSFormWrite - This flow writes any changes made to the system settings via the NodeRed UI back to inverter SSDSRead - This flow reads the "Default Settings" from storage and displays it via the NodeRed UI. I use the "Default Settings" to store my optimal system settings when there is no Load Shedding. SSDSWrite - This flow writes the "Default Settings" from the storage to the Inverter. The flow is also triggered automatically from the LoadShedding status flow SSLSRead - This flow reads the "Load Shedding Settings" from storage and displays it via the NodeRed UI. I use the "Default Settings" to store my optimal system settings when there is no Load Shedding. SSLSWrite - This flow writes the "Load Shedding Settings" from the storage to the Inverter. The flow is also triggered automatically from the LoadShedding status flow TimeMode - This flow triggers different settings on different days of the week. My PV Solar is currently not big enough to carry my whole house, I utilize this flow to feed electricity back into the non-essential loads on the days which my domestic worker is not working. This helps me to optimize my savings on certain days of the week while maintaining healthy battery levels. NodeRed Palettes required for the flows: node-red-contrib-actionflows node-red-contrib-influxdb node-red-contrib-modbus node-red-contrib-queue-gate node-red-contrib-schedex node-red-contrib-simple-gate node-red-dashboard The next couple of posts have been reserved to further expand on the hardware requirements and basic set up of the monitoring. The idea of sharing my flows is to contribute to the community, let us keep this going as a community project by assisting and contributing to project. flows (5).json sunsynk_modbus.docx
    10 points
  4. In this video we asked Keith several questions about Sunsynk and its role in South Africa. Keith is based in China and sent us an excellent and informative video to our request. This video interview offers you a strong insight into Keith’s thinking, design philosophy and the journey he took to create Sunsynk and its development. Key Takeaways Kieth is a certified Electrical Engineer Sunsynk started in marine outfitting mainstream shipping and yachts. South Africa is marked as a major market Sunsynk is over 10 years old Sunsynk is developing large scale inverters up to 100kw with imbalance modes Parallel up to 15 Sunsynks together
    10 points
  5. Energy-Jason

    Powerforum Give Away

    Congratulations to @hoohloc you have been randomly selected and the winner of a RIOT. Pdf attached. Well done!!! We will be having more give aways very soon! Please PM us your delivery details. Jay riot_cloudlink__a4_pamphlet_electronic_fa.pdf
    9 points
  6. YellowTapemeasure

    Oh No!

    Yes, you are. Firstly, I'm no leftist libertarian, and I am not going to apologise for it, or for thinking the way that I do. In my own case, I have, at my own expense, and using my own (after taxation) money, purchased, installed and paid VAT on infrastructure that will relieve Eskom from their mandate (and until recently monopoly as a sole supplier) to supplying the daily 10kWh that it used to supply me with, sporadically and whenever whenever they felt like it. Their power supply was so erratic and unreliable and I wasn't able to generate any form of reliable income stream working from home. Their inability to fulfill their legislative mandate, I might add, is no fault of my own. The outcome is that as of today, I am able to provide a far more reliable power supply than Eskom, and I do it both day AND night, so Eskom's argument that I am "...forcing them to ramp up power at a faster rate at night" is total rubbish at best and completely economical with the truth . The truth is exactly the other way around. It is because of their inability (for whatever reasons, there are many which I will not go into here) to run a decent utility, (which BTW was at one stage considered the most efficient in the world, notwithstanding the fact that they had a monopoly on supply), that I have had to dig into my own pocket to provide energy for myself. I have incurred personal capital expenditure, and I am faced with current and future maintenance costs for infrastructure which I have, at my own volition, installed in order to meet my needs (to be a productive citizen!?). I am the one taking the risk of a long-term investment (15+ years just to break even) in something that I doubt that I will ever see a return on. In doing so, however, I have relieved them of their duty to supply my home with that 10kWh per day, which, due to their (self-inflicted) shortage, they can distribute and supply to the many in need. For that, I think that at the very least, I (and all the other home solar power users) actually deserve a big "thank you". In fact, Eskom should actually go on its hands and knees to thank home and business solar power owners, for their fortitude, their investment, their long-term commitment to this country, and their ability and bravery to get involved in something which is not their core competency, and which actually helps Eskom deliver (whatever) service (is left) to those less fortunate. Instead, Eskom decides that we are the enemy, and punishes us with additional taxation An interesting strategy
    9 points
  7. I'm really sorry @Luminous , but there's not much interesting to share. Just everyday's boring stuff. For example, I had to clearly label the bays in my space-shuttle landing dock, as some (female) family members were not able to clearly understand where they should (NOT) park: Based on the current situation in the world, I upgraded to the AirLock. You know, just in case something goes wrong: And yes, I bought another rack cabinet, so if I will accidentally become a billionaire one day, I will not have a problem with storing some additional lithium for my LAB:
    9 points
  8. Tim

    Another Blue Install

    Sorry about the title - seems to be a forum rib of sorts ? Anyway here is my install - was quite challenging doing it all myself with little solar experience. Silly things like just getting inverter on the wall (thing ways a ton) , thank goodness for climbing gear and pulleys, made it a steep learning curve. Hopefully the forum wolves will be kind though . System :Victron Inverter - Quattro 10000va / Victron 250/100 SmartSolar MPPT / 20 x 330 Watt Canadian Solar / Victron BMV702 / Revov 10 kWh / Venus GX running ESS / ET112 Grid Meter / Home Assistant Integration. In case you wondering system is limited that it can’t feed more than 4.6kW into grid. Things I would have done differently: - Bigger fuse boxes & bit more spacing - 35mm2 wire is difficult to bend - Wider trucking - same reason as above My average use is 30-35 kWh per day - system is producing 18kWh on average (mid winter) per day - looking forward to summer. The Battery is on paper too small as most use is in evening, however in Port Elizabeth we can Grid tie one to one and we are on Eskom time of use tariffs, so battery only needs to get me through the 2 peak periods, then use the grid as a cheap battery for balance of time. With the home automation (Home Assistant) tie-in, I manipulate a few things on system via Modibus to optimise the return: System makes sure batteries are charged for morning and evening peak using grid if needed - (buys cheaper power or uses credit generated during day). I do this by changing the Grid set point higher for this period. If there is loadshedding (it reads the loadshedding status form Eskom website) - it changes min SOC from 20% to 50% - that way there is enough capacity in batteries to get through any loadshedding episodes regardless of time of day. Also notifies me of grid failure over google home and on phone Pic 1 - Christmas - trying to figure everything out Pic 2 - figuring out cable routes - old inverter/ups in green looking sad Pic 3 - Old Main Db Board (nice excuse to tidy up) Pic 4 - Honey will we have lights tonight ? - no pressure - all stripped out Pic 5 - Main Db Looking bit more tidy - split into 2 - Db1 non critical AC loads - Oven and Geyser on Left ELU - Db3 - Critical Loads - balance of house - plugs and lights (Note Inverter feeds back up to DB1 if grid present so DB1 is on Inverter / solar /battery until there is a grid failure) Pic 6 - Revov Batteries 10 KWh- server rack box adapted with some additional home made welded brackets (its a 50kg load) - but nicely off the floor Pic 7 - DC Buss-bar - cramped DC shunt and fuse box - will know for next time - give yourself more room Pic 8 - AC DB 2 - feeds to and from Db 1/D b3 with 3 way change over switch (can bypass inverter if its faulty) - MPPT on left - Solar DC DB & fuses on right Pic 9 - Solar DB - only partly my work that''s why is so neat - 4 strings of 5 panels - bottom 2 cables have subsequently been increased to 10mm2 from 6mm2 shown here - MPPT was kicking errors - seems happier now Pic 10 - Overview of installation - Inverter quite noisy (I am noise sensitive) - so nice to be in the garage vs in house Pic 11 - Colour GX and BMV installed round corner (more accessible) Pic 12 - Panels - 20 x 330W - 4 strings of 5 - 5 deg - facing NE - raised back 5 because of shading Pic 13 - Home Assistant Home Automation Tie in - Note loadshedding sensor (still working on overall layout but its 100% customisable) Pic 14 - Municipal Grid-tie meter with ET112 Grid Meter on right
    9 points
  9. Version 3.10

    244 downloads

    Reading live data from Goodwe ES Power Inverters from Local Area Network for Windows XP, 7, 8.1 and 10. Shows data sent by UDP packets. Installation instructions inside the .zip file. Please comment on any errors found. Any suggestion is welcome. Version 1.0: November 7, 2020 Version 2.0: January 22, 2021 Version 3.0: May 16, 2021 Youtube short video In Operation: Version 1.0.
    8 points
  10. In December 2020, I unfortunately fell victim to a lightning surge from the grid. Various items in my house was impacted. Thankfully my Axpert inverters(x2) survived with no issues, although the Raspberry Pi that runs ICC was effected, Pi booted but USB and network ports dead. My Pylontech bank(5 x US2000 Plus) was impacted as well. The communication ports(console, RS485, CAN etc) was impacted on all 5 Pylontech modules. Fortunately they were still charging and discharging normally but i could not get any info from them. I sent them back to the supplier to get a full report. The report stated that the CMU boards in all 5 modules had to be replaced and Pylontech warranty does not cover surges, so I had to claim from insurance. Got all approvals and all boards were replaced. I commissioned the entire bank after the repairs was done. After a few days I was noticing that 2 modules cell voltages was going over 3.65v during charge and these units were throwing High Voltage and Over voltage errors in the logs. When this happens, it stopped accepting any current and waits for those effected cells voltages to drop below 3.5v before accepting a charge again. This happened over a few days and the SOH counts were increasing for these 2 modules. I decided to pull them out of the bank and to my surprise they were swollen! I was actually was shocked(no pun) when I saw this. I returned those 2 modules back to the supplier and there new report concluded that the cells are damaged from the surge and irrepairable. Their recommendation was to replace those 2 modules, which i did with a US3000C and a US2000. I collected the damaged modules and in the spirit of science, being inquisitive and sharing knowledge I decided to salvage some parts before disposing the cells. I took the following pics: Bottom cover off, we can see 3 x 16v battery packs(notice them being swollen), connected in series. Power Management Unit(PMU) board on the bottom left and Communication Management Unit(CMU) on the bottom right. PMU Top: PMU Bottom, notice all the MOSFETS here.... this side of the board is attached to a heatsink situated on the front right top side of an installed module: CMU Top: CMU Bottom: LED Strip: Internal power cable size 8AWG - 10mm2: Battery Packs: If you counted, there are 10 pouches per pack. A total of 30 pouches in a single US2000 Plus module, equates to 1.6v per pouch. BatteryView software shows 15 cells, so i am guessing that 2 pouches make up a cell of 3.2v. Enjoy the pics.
    8 points
  11. Seeing as the 'smart' home bug has bitten me in a bad way, I've been working on integrating all the various bits of electronics in the house. One of the obvious things to get integrated is the power monitoring side and in my case, a Goodwe 5048ES inverter. I'm using Home Assistant as my automation system and there is integration for this available, but only to the SEMS portal. This won't do, as the SEMS portal isn't great, it sits in the cloud and it only updates every 5 minutes or so. Ideally you want to integrate directly to the inverter and get much more frequent updates, but I couldn't find anything that is integrated directly. Looking at the inverter there's a few RS485 ports available, so it might be possible to get some data off this. But it's also possible that these are only for battery integration or otherwise unused. So, I figured a more elegant way would be to try and talk to the inverter through the network seeing as it's sitting there already. Again, there's pretty much no information available on achieving this but I figured it was worth a try. Running PV master on a mobile device and a packet sniffer running in the background, I managed to log some interesting data in order to allow me to talk to the inverter through it's network interface. I've made some progress, but this is very much a work in progress; decoding the data is a bit of a challenge but I think I'm about halfway identifying all the data. I'm posting this here as hopefully someone else has a bit more insight and can help filling in the missing blanks, or at the very least, it might help someone with a bit more smarts to crack it properly. Basically, the communication between PV Master and the inverter is in the form of UDP packets with the inverter listening on port 8899. Because it's UDP, it's connectionless. There's no need to explicitly connect to the inverter (as would be the case for a TCP connection), it simply sits and listens for the relevant requests and then broadcasts back with the results. Nice and simple, although (because of the inherent handicap of the UDP protocol) there's no guarantee that there will be a response. In testing I've had responses from the inverter in most cases, but it did happen where the response went missing. So, you'll have to make sure your implementation is robust enough for this case and for ensuring that all the data packets do arrive and that they are complete. There is a checksum in the inverter's protocol in order to validate the data, but it's something to take note of. There's a few requests you can send the inverter, and based on that the inverter can respond with things like it's model/serial, it's status or confirmations whens you change settings. For the most part I'm only interested in getting the inverter status. Interestingly, there's no authentication mechanism. You fire off the request, and the inverter will answer - provided your request makes sense. I've attached a document outlining the information I was able to decode from the information request response from the inverter. Still a few blanks there but the results are encouraging. In order to get the response below, you need to issue the following bytes to inverter IP on port 8899: 0xaa, 0x55, 0xc0, 0x7f, 0x01, 0x06, 0x00, 0x02, 0x45. The 6th byte is the request type and the 9th byte is the checksum. For the purposes of this exercise I won't go to deep into the various requests you can send to the inverter.
    8 points
  12. Hello All. To celebrate passing the 10k user mark we will be having a give away to the value of R4900 to a randomly selected active forum member. This will happen on Monday. Stay Tuned! Sincerely Jay
    7 points
  13. Leshen

    Sunsynk 8kw Inverter

    Hi Guys. My new installation. 24 x 390w JA Mono solar panels with an 8kw Sunsynk inverter and 2 x 5kwh Bull Lithium batteries. More pics to follow soon...
    7 points
  14. Faced with the costs of "Wonder Gadgets" to heat water from excess solar availability, I have come up with a different way of doing it.... I have already had, for some time now, a raspberry pi hooked to my inverter monitoring and controlling various bits and bobs around the place... One of my greatest frustrations is the "lost solar" power that is often available during the average day.... This hot water system but one small addition I have made to try and utilize this unused power. I put in an order to a local (EL) company for a triple 220V geyser element. It wasn't as pricey as I expected. The 3 elements are 500W/750W/1000W respectively, all on a single screw in, standard fitting (with an extra long thermostat pocket as well, which reaches well beyond the ends of the elements.). The long and the short of it is, using my pi/mqtt/fabricobbled system, I can get a pretty close estimate of what inverter/solar power is available beyond the immediate consumption at any given point in time... Using a small "Sonoff" wifi switch, hot wired to a quad 10A relay board, a bit of Node-Red and some head scratching, the net result is, well fantastic! If there's 500W excess available, turn on the 500W element... Same for 750/1kw.... Need more? Turn them on in combination, to step in 8 steps, 0W to 2.25Kw as needed... The extra deep pocket for the thermostat got a Sonoff with a DS18B20 temp sensor to feed info back into the mqtt as well.... (Yep, you can series the elements as well with a bit more head scratching to lower the wattages still further, but lower than 500W is a waste of time as I have found out...) Safety? Sure... Using the existing Thermostat pocket in the geyser, there's a good old fashioned clicky-clicky rod slotted in... Hooked up to the common neutral of the 3 elements... If he's unhappily hot, everybody shuts down... And... It works... Well! Total cost of the additional bits was less than ZAR1K, its been running for about 6 months now and barring some really crappy weather, the household of 4 has used very little gas in the geyser system over the period... Cheerz... E
    7 points
  15. HubbleLithium

    Pylontech vs Hubble

    Hi Community, Seems the forum is decending into just degrading brands and negative commenting which is very unfortunate, as the powerforum is a great wealth of knowledge for power backup and solar enthusiasts. We're not dodging questions, we dont live on this forum, and we are not affiliated to powerforum. Seems if we dont answer questions immediately then there are negative views. We only check this forum once a week if that. If you have questions please contact us through our official channels or on our website contact form. For support and technical questions please contact us direct through our official channels, we will be more than happy to assist our clients.
    7 points
  16. Hi Dreaming about solar... not because of Escom, but because it's cool stuff. Never got so far to make the jump. The >100K always found another place where it was spend (sometimes on very big white elephants). Today, I made the dive and transferred the payment of my first solar system. (With luck on my side, I will be dead before the panels read their end of life) Sunsynk 8 6.4 BSL Bull JA Solar 405 Mono's and all the other related goodiest A very big thank you to the guys from Power Forum Store for the good prices, good courier costs and excellent service. I will start a post on my build so that other can see how a newbie tries to figure out all this nice goodies.
    7 points
  17. So, for years I’ve been planning on going solar but I never really spent the time to investigate it properly. Both the missus and I work from home and with the latest spate of load shedding I just had enough and bit the bullet. After much research (and poaching ideas from here), I had a solution in mind. I knew my budget wouldn’t be enough, but I had to start somewhere and get a semi decent system installed, get an idea how it works and then decide where to upgrade once the system has been running for a while. In terms of the components, I had a lot of help from the guy that supplied the kit (he ultimately needs to do the CoC when complete) and I really wanted the result to be correct. For a start, I got the Goodwe 5048ES inverter, 2 * Pylon US2000’s and 8 * 405w JA Mono’s. My plan is to add another 2 * US2000’s and 8 more panels; I’m still undecided what to get first. Anyway... I knew my current DB board wasn’t ideal for this process, so I tackled that first. As you can see, the breakers were old and there was simply just not enough space to fit everything. Luckily, this is inside one of the kitchen cupboards, so I can fit a bigger, surface mount DB board and it won’t be an eye sore being behind cupboard doors. First up, I had to figure out what went were and with what. I had to figure out which lives go with which neutrals as these had to be split into essentials and non-essentials. Yeah, eina. Clearly the wiring wasn’t going to be long enough, so this had to be extended using crimp ferrules and heat shrink. At least I now know where all the circuits go and how to split them properly (lives and neutrals together) And so the fun begins. This took a while... Almost done... Tadaaa... This is where I’m at. I still need to split some circuits (like garage and aircon circuits), but that’ll be soon. As for mounting the inverter, I was really lucky (for once) that the broom cupboard is right next to the DB board. My dear wife had to go find another place to go park her broom... Aaaaand, done! The door for that cupboard still needs to be modified. I’m going to get some nice punched and brushed alu grid that’ll replace the wood panels in the door. Obviously I don’t want to just close it up as that inverter is fanless and needs to breathe. That being said, it hardly got warm over the last two weeks, but I’d rather be safe, keep said wife less upset and to keep curious fingers at bay.
    7 points
  18. Sooo, I decided to get two more batteries and 8 more panels. Now I’m pretty much done spending money going down this rabbit hole... Anyway, I got the two additional batteries installed and managed to find a ventilation solution that’ll work while retaining the cupboard door. I’m just waiting for more panel hardware then I can get the additional panels installed on the roof. As I mentioned elsewhere, the battery stack is still running in backup mode (only charging/float mode, no discharging) in order for the packs to balance out with each other. After a day or so, all lights started flashing/displaying in sync. I’ll let it go for another day or so to make sure they settled nicely. In other news, I’ve been having a ball with getting the home integration going as well. Just basic for now, running Home Assistant, but I’ve got all the nice Sonoff light switches here, waiting for the electrician to pull in Neutrals to all the light switches in the house. In testing, I already have all outside lights, gates and garage door integrated. My wife thinks I’m a nerd...
    7 points
  19. ___

    Backup ups

    Dude... I once saw a motorcycle advertised on gumtree. Beautiful machine, almost brand new. The seller explained that his reason for selling is that apparently "Do whatever the f... you want" doesn't mean what he thinks it does.
    7 points
  20. Maybe the admins must put a pin/sticky somewhere...? The MO is generally the same. Batteries with 10 year warranties, at 50% discount as "end of year" (or "end of yeah" when they get sloppy with copy/paste), black friday, christmas, load shedding special, stock clearance sale. .... often with a nice big count down timer reminding you how close you are to losing out on the amazing special (or there are only 2 units left...). The scam likely has 2 components. Some people eventually get (clearly used/abused, identifying info removed, no manual etc.) batteries (? stolen cell tower leochs etc.?). The second component is probably letting people pay via EFT/cash deposit and just not supplying any goods. (gumtree/olx/facebook etc will have a number of these ads). They seem to do some homework and likely also take note of this particular forum since the newer site/s specifiy the "online only shop" part (too many people started asking about addresses and google street view?) so maybe the 50% discount will change to 45%....and the warehouse move to Askham... They also appear to have people posting positive reviews on hellopeter to counter negative comments. Many of the web addresses seem chosen to look like existing companies but with a strategic hyphen or variance of spelling that one will easily gloss over. Also they do not seem to bother to setup a mail account on the domain so fancy web domain only operates via gmail... From info in the public domain here is a sample with some unifying themes and some info that is useful to cross reference with google when the next add/site pops up.. solarenergyrsa.co.za/?product=12kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-last-chance-yeah-end-stock-clearance-sale-50-off +27 84-302-7691 +27-65-952-7634 +27 62-456-0626 Offices: East LondonDistribution warehouse: Johannesburg(Please Note that We are fully a Online Store) thewattsstore.co.za/product/12kwh-lithium-ion-package-discount-on-special-price-sale/ +27 62 456 0626 Beaconsfield Rd, Braelyn, East London, 5201Warehouses in Port Elizabeth, Cape Town, Durban & Johannesburg thesolarwarehouse.co.za/index.php/product/6-0kwh-tesvolt-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-with-8000-cycles-days-life-now-month-end-50-off-clearance-sale/ +27 67 791 9959 +27 67 809 0979 Shipments from JHB/CPT Warehouse li-iontech.co.za/index.php/product/12kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-last-year-stock-clearance-sale-50-off/ +27 64 489 1208 Head office: Moffett Retail Park, Port Elizabeth, RSA Distribution Warehouses: JHB & PE solarcityrsa.co.za/index.php/product/6kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warranty-last-chance-holiday-stock-clearance-sale-50-off/ +27 65 346 6447 +27 64 489 1208 JHB Wearhouse address: Items are Drop-shipped from suppliers in JHB, CPT & Germiston RSA thesolar-shop.co.za/index.php/product-category/lithium-ion-battery/ +27-65 952 7634 +27 68 011 2309 +27 61 363 4125 +27 79 763 3694 gooffthegrid.co.za +27 65 346 6447 +27 68 233 2924 +27 83 998 1589 Shipments from JHB/CPT sethsolar.co.za +27 83 854 5027 Wearhouse Address: Port Elizerberth thesolar-experts.co.za +27 64 489 1208 Head Office: Moffett Retail Park. Warehouse in JHB & PE solarstorage-experts.co.za/index.php/product/today-only-get-a-24kwh-lithium-ion-batteries-with-10yrs-warrant +27 64 489 1208 solarguru-rsa.co.za +27 83 854 5027 solarmarket.co.za
    7 points
  21. FransSmith

    My upgrade installation

    used to have a Fronius 20 kw 3 phase inverter with 26 x 305 watt panels upgrade = 3 x 5kw Sunsync with extra 9 x 390 watt panels (total of 35 panels = 11 440 watt) and 3 x Hubble 5.5 kw batteries work in progress thank you Leshen, Steve and team
    6 points
  22. I have been trying to make sense of this post. Please help. I assume that the 5M you refer to is 5MW (megawatt). I assume that 40M is in fact 40m (metres), and 8M is 8m. I further assume that the 605W you refer to is a 605W panel. The only one I can find is a Jinko RS600M-120HC - they measure 2172mm x 1303mm. You could fit a theoretical maximum of 113 into an area 40m x 8m if you packed them without gaps to avoid shading, more like 40% of that in practice. "Easily 120" would be a stretch - perhaps I have misunderstood you? By 7.2 KWhr I assume that you mean 7.2kWh. I do not understand that - 120 x 605W would be about 72kW. (Expressing power output in kWh makes no sense unless you attach a time dimension to it.) Did you mean to say 7.2kW? If so it should have been 72kW. So, (making many assumptions) is this what you were trying to say? "I have a space of 40m x 8m where I could fit in 72kW of PV using 120 x 605W panels". It would not be quite true, but OK. Forgive me if I am being too pedantic, but there are many people who read these forums who are not technically educated - the conversation will be more easily understood by all if we so not each invent our own abbreviations.
    6 points
  23. Ian

    Oh No!

    All I can see is this accelerating migration to off-grid, which will just make their situation worse. They are in such a mess:(
    6 points
  24. Just installed a Sunsynk 8kw inverter DIY and want to share some info. We use about 1000kwh (units) per month in our house so about 33 per day with about half in the day and half after PV hours. This is about average for a family home I recon in SA. Already have 2 Solar geysers, gas plates and all lights LED. I wanted to be independent from the grid as much as possible which weighed heavier than economics although my return is still acceptable and higher after tax than any risk free investment. The whole house runs through the inverter including oven, the solar geyser AC elements, all plugs etc. Only the 4 Aircons is supplied before the inverter but with the Sunsynk CT which fit over the supply line the inverter will push electricity to them too if sufficient PV and battery power are available. I have one normal plug before inverter for if I have to weld or use heavy machinery. I Installed: Sunsynk 8kw Brilliant inverter easy to do DIY and with help from Powerforum posts. Jinko Mono Cheetah 400w panels * 18 - Connected in 2 series - 9 each. 9 panels in series match perfectly, max voltage around 410V real life in October (Sunsynk specs max 450V) and producing 97% of rated panel watts (3500w per string) max. Fitted on aluminium rails on tile roof. Fitting the brackets under tiles is quite a job got my son to do that. 6mm PV cable running in PVC conduit from panels to inverter. One set is facing West and the other facing North. I think if you can get East and west facing panels that is ideal, as you need PV power early in the morning to charge low batteries and then you want to produce as late as possible in the afternoon to have full batteries going into evening. Although not the ideal orientation PV panels are cheaper than additional batteries. Pylontech US3000 * 5 These batteries when 100% charged at 5pm run the whole house through the night (have about 20 outside lights 3 pc's etc) and start to charge at 6am from west panels on around 30% SOC in October. By 11:30 am the batteries are normally 100% charged, then I boost the geysers through Geyserwise on free electricity to increase their temperature so that they are still warm in the morning. PV protection DB with fuses, surge arrestors and DC isolators. Fuse and isolator between Batteries and Inverter Grounding ROD and all earth wiring. AC CB and change over switch etc in AC DB with relay for earth neutral bond Total cost about R 210 000 (ex own labour) except for heavy overcast days I am not using any power from Tshwane, bill was about R1800-R2000 per month. The feeling when the kettle and iron etc are on during the day and you know that it is not costing you anything (yes i know it is kinda) is priceless.
    6 points
  25. Hi Guss Welcome to the world of solar power. A world where you can turn lights on at any time you choose. A world where nobody else dictates when you can do a washing load. A world where you never have to miss your favorite show..... This is the best decision you have ever made. We don’t worry about load shedding, we make our own power!! If you need any advice on anything, we are ALL here to help.
    6 points
  26. Thanks for all the advice guys, version 2 is done, tested and working as it should just need to wire it in, was a pretty tight fit in the box
    6 points
  27. We are very proud to showcase a Solar installation of Solar equipment Power Forum Store supplied to a Power Forum Member Equipment List 1 Sunsync 5kw True Hybrid Single phase with Duel MPPT 5 Year Warranty 3 Phylontech US 3000 3.5KW Lithium Battery 10 year warranty 1 Cable Pack for US2000B / US3000 / Phantom-S Solar Batteries 1 Pylon US3000B x3 Cabinet With Support Rails 12 JA Solar 380W Mono Percium 5BB Silver Frame 12 year warranty 12 Renusol End Clamp+ 30 - 50mm Silver 18 Renusol Middle Clamp+ 31 - 51mm Silver 30 Renusol MetaSole+ Sheet thickness: steel 0.50-1.50 mm, aluminium 0.5-2.00mm 1 PV Combiner 600V Protection Box 2 Inputs 2 Outputs 16A Isolator Type II SPD 1 Earth Neutral Bridge Box for AC Protection Box 1 KETO Battery Disconnector with 160A Fuses 2 Battery Cable 1m - Black 2 Battery Cable 1m - Red 1 Helukabel 6mm2 single-core DC cable 25m - Black 1 Helukabel 6mm2 single-core DC cable 25m - Red 8 MC4 Female Connector - Single 8 MC4 Male Connector - Single 4 Cable Terminal Lug M8 - Single Configuration 6 x 390 Watt Mono panels with a total rating of 2.340 KW per MPPT 2 x MPPT's On the Sunsynk 5.5 KW Euro Spec 3 x 3.5 KW Pylontech Batteries with a total Rating of 10.5 KW and Max sustained load of 5.4 KW The Installer was Werner From Elecdelite an he did a sterling job of installing the Solar system Power Forum Store assisted the Client with system design and spec. If you need assistance of any kind related to your solar power requirements do not hesitate to contact Power Forum Store. View the attached pictures
    6 points
  28. Last year, I added a wallbox to my solar, for charging electric vehicles. It's a single-phase 32A, so the max charging power is roughly 7.5kW. Some details are written in my previous post here: https://powerforum.co.za/topic/2322-youdas-off-grid-lab/page/2/?tab=comments#comment-58507 Personally, I don't own an EV, but for the nine months in a year the solar production is so excessive, that I have no use for all that power. Therefore, I offered EV charging for free and published the wallbox location on the PlugShare.com and on some other local charging maps too. Since then, curious EV drivers are stopping by, mostly just to check whether the charging a car from solar is really possible. And yes - it is Some of the cars that stopped for charging were Mitsubishi (hybrid), Citroen C-Zero, Hyundai Ioniq, Fiat 500e and the last one, just couple of days ago, was Hyundai Kona. Hyundai Ioniq: Fiat 500e: Hyundai Kona: Most of the drivers are charging just for 30 minutes or so, which equals to 3-4kWh and 15km of range. On the chart below, it's marked as "EVSE". If I do remember correctly, just one driver stayed longer than hour and took 8kWh. That equals to 30-40km, based on the model of the car. By the way - is there anybody else on the forum, charging his EV from the off-grid solar? If so, do you offer free charging to the other drivers or not?
    6 points
  29. Hi @Coulomb @weber I see that you've done a lot of work for the PV community, namely when comes to improving firmware of a numerous Voltronic Axpert inverters. I noticed, that you're giving your time for free and also do not posses a sample of Axpert King, which greatly limits your ability to continue with the firmware testing and development. Although I'm not personally using any Axpert, I am a big fan of self-sustainability and renewable energy sources. Therefore, I'd like to help you a bit: I am publicly offering you a one-time sponsorship of 1000 USD, so you will be able to obtain necessary Axpert King sample. There's just one condition: you will include me as a HW sponsor in the Readme.txt file of all the future releases of Axpert King patched firmware. If you do agree, just send me your PayPal address in a PM. This is not a joke. Youda
    6 points
  30. yes sure. this is the outside connection box at the firewood place where the PV panels are installed, with DC switch and overvoltage protection. In addition there is a 400V 3-phases vonnection (powered from inside house, not from the panels) for a wood splitter this is inside the house, the new Infinisolar E 5.5 kw inverter. Actual it's running just grid tied because the DIY battery isn't finished the battery will be made with 18650 lithium cells I get from defective ebike and laptop akkus (mostly ebike) most of the vendors of ebike akkus are using 18650 Li-Ion batteries inside, between 40 and 60 pieces after diassembling the akkupacks I test voltage, internal resistance and... ...and remaining capacity with some Liito kala Lii500 Engineer charger. Most of the ebike akkus I got have defective BMS electronics and the batteries are just finde with a remaining capacity between 80% and 99%. I write the capacity at the cells and ... ...now I have collected something about 3.000 or 4.000 Pieces, don't know exactly. Most of them are in the range between 2.500 and 3.500mAh actually I am sorting them by capacity in steps of 50mAh after this, I still have one test left, charging them up, waiting 4 weeks and after this testing the voltage. If voltage is down under 4,0V then the cell isn't good for use. The others can be used for the solar powerwall. I am planing a minimum of 10 KWh, better 15KWh in total. 14s240p which means 240 cells parallel per pack and then 14 identical packs in serial so I can use a toal of 48V. Normally you use only 13s for 48v but because I am using used batteries I will not stress them by charging them up to 4,2v each but a maximum of 4,0 or even 3,9 so they will last longer. To build 14 packs with 240 cells each will take lots of time and I have some other projects running so this will be something for autumn / winter. But I decided to start a smaller test-build with 14s40p out of the not-so-good laptop batteries with round about 2.100 - 2.200mAh If you have any questions please feel free to ask
    6 points
  31. Just received my gift today and so excited to give it a try. Thank you powerforum
    5 points
  32. Looked at it all, and not just the paperwork and stuff which is an overload for just a household consumer... At the end of the day I am not going to pay any new premium to the Municipality or Eskom. I have operated almost off-grid for almost 3 years without an issue, so my choice is to disconnect my Grid power. I am going to have to get some additional equipment (since my wifes business involves baking), but we have not used Grid power for 3 years even with her business, and so far no major issues as long as we keep our power draw within spec. I have applied to eThekwini to disconnect our power (this seems to confuse the few callers I have had), and had stupid people tell me about a R15k charge to disconnect - I just read the municipal bylaws straight back at them and they stop talking. After 4 weeks, I still can't get disconnected, even though I have switched off their mains. Tried to charge me for estimated usage of 11Kw last month which I refused. It is a fight to go off-grid, but if you are sure your system and backups can do it, then keep fighting and don't let a municipality or Eskom force you into a position, With eThekwini connection, my monthly cost is approx R1800. Without it should drop to R1200. I am also busy with Water costs as I have 2 Jojo's for seperate use and use less than 1kL from eThekwini. If I manage this right I may be able to cut this off too (especially since our usage is less than 200l/person/day) Some municipal bills I still have to pay (with "long teeth" in afrikaans)... Sewerage disposal, Garbage Disposal, and Rates. But everything other than Rates, can be reduced to almost nothing, and they aren't that expensive anyway. My end game here is just to tell you all that you can get out of Eskom/Municipal costs, but you have to do it when your house is ready... Don't blindly say "f*cuk Eskom". You need to work it all out like you would a business decision to get the best outcome for your own environment. You might be a small consumer, but it can't hut to ask your municipality for a better price... After all they offer that to many businesses, and if you get the right operator, they may do the same for you.
    5 points
  33. Ok, people, my vote is for no registration or licensing required, unless you feed into the grid, if all you are doing is supplementing commercial power with your own, or even run off the grid, it should have no requirements. As for being a producer of power... the problem is, that if you need to feed into the grid, the line voltage will rise and this, if everyone in your neighbourhood wants to do this, can end up with 300V on a 220V circuit, which some equipment may not be all that happy with, then a cloud comes over/the wind stops and all the power being produced disappears and the utility is up the creek and the 300V turns into 180V as all the consumers pull instead of push power... it is not as simple as some may try and make it sound, that we are being ripped off by Eskom and the grid tied municipalities goes without saying, but since they have run the infrastructure into bad shape & all, it probably is best to consider doing them the favour of lightening the load and disconnecting from the grid. At least until such time as they get their issues sorted and produce reliable power at a more reasonable rate and don't charge for everything else that is really included in the energy charge, separately, but is a great way of adding more fees and make it sound no too unreasonable. Service and Administration Charge Network Capacity Charge Network Demand Charge Anciliiary service charge Energy charge Wait, you forgot to add the drinks and hookers charge...
    5 points
  34. Busy with a 3 phase installation with 3 x 5kw Sunsynk and 3 Hubble’s. Will post pictures when it’s complete.
    5 points
  35. Leshen

    Pylontech vs Hubble

    Good day guys. Just a quick post with some pictures on what the popular Pylontech batteries look like on the inside vs the latest Hubble battery. Big difference on the quality. Some corrosion already occuring on the Pylontech. Hubble has BYD NMC prismatic cells and its 1C.
    5 points
  36. calypso

    Pylontech vs Hubble

    If I were Hubble I would would pay Leshen to stop posting. Literally destroying the reputation of a up and coming brand talking smack. Unfortunately for now, the damage is already done.
    5 points
  37. A post yesterday reminded me to check the linked site for recent firmware files. I had not looked for over a year, and found 3 recent firmwares there. One of them is removable display firmware 02.60: https://www.ostrovni-elektrarny.cz/support/Axpert/FW/RemotePanel_Reflash_MCU(02.60).rar This is listed as an Axpert King firmware, but I'm guessing that it would also work with Axpert VM III main firmware version 91.20, also on that site: https://www.ostrovni-elektrarny.cz/support/Axpert/FW/VMIII_Ver91.20.7z The removable display firmware adds another BMS type, LIC. There was for a long time type LIB, which I thought might have stood for LIBrary, but now it looks like it stands for LIthium type B and LIthium type C. There is also an Axpert Max 7200 W main firmware version 90.11 there: https://www.ostrovni-elektrarny.cz/support/Axpert/FW/MAX7200_Main_CNTL_DSP_90.11.7z .
    5 points
  38. Bobster

    Happy New Year

    I don't think I know anybody who had a good 2020, but I do hope there are better things ahead for 2021. I have enjoyed this forum this year, and have learned from the helpful, knowledgeable members. I hope next year is better for y'all. At least you will be able to keep the lights on.
    5 points
  39. Beat

    Axpert radio interferences

    Success ! The radio interference is gone. I improved the inductance and added some capacitors. In order to run several turns trough the ferrite core I went to the motor and transformer winding shop to get some 6mm² winding wire. But they don’t have such. We finally agreed on 2mm² wire that I would use in 3 wire bundles. I bought 10m of it (R40). I also went to the electronic shop to buy 4 0.33µF 310V capacitors (R40). I first thought to have one core for each polarity. But then I realized that the 30A PV current could saturate the core and reduce the inductance. So I decided to run both polarities trough the same core. The two magnetic fields would then cancel each other and prevent saturation. I managed to run each polarity 3 times trough the core. Since the core can be opened it is easy to wind each half separately. I separated the polarities with a piece of card board. One challenge was to strip the 12 wire ends of the tough isolation varnish. The outgoing bundles are hold together with shrinking tubes. I tightened the two half cores together with a strong cable tie to prevent a gap between the core halves. The finished winding is shown in picture below. I had many thoughts how to connect capacitors to the 48V M6 terminals. I finally found the solution shown below. I soldered the capacitor leads to 6X22 washers with a 60W soldering iron. The washers are then installed under the M6 nuts of the terminals. The final installation of inductance and capacitors is shown in picture below. The outgoing leads of the inductance are directly wired to the PV input terminals together with the leads of the capacitors. I had to solder little pieces of installation wire to the capacitors leads because the terminals would not clamp the tiny wire of the capacitors. The other ends are crimped to the earth wire.
    5 points
  40. Web interface sorted. I can now remotely alter my inverter settings. Next I want to integrate the settings into my automation flows. This would essentially allow me to run two seperate sets of settings, Loadshedding vs No loadshedding. The load shedding settings can be triggered by a webhook and will ensure that the battery charging is prioritized when loadshedding is active.
    5 points
  41. Well, I finally twisted Jaco's arm into a non-blue install, and the results are beautiful... With the whole house as a dummy load, I also got a chance to properly test the battery and assorted bits. Load peaked at 11kW before the geyser controller managed to turn the geyser off, and then stabilised at around 8kW, with 195A draw from the batteries. After around 10 minutes, batteries, terminals and connecting plates were all still at room temperature. The wires connecting to the inverter were however a few degrees warmer. Glad I did not go smaller than the 70mm^2 I eventually settled on. (I have 2x 95mm^2 wires in parallel for joining the banks - and these wires also stayed cool.) All in all, it has turned out to be a successful experiment so far. Been off grid for 15 hours so far, and hope to stay that way pretty much indefinitely.
    5 points
  42. Mad Mike

    Newbie-ish

    Finally the last of 4 80P 14S packs is now done. I have posted a few pictures showing the individually fused cells. As done on the previously built packs I used 3Amp glass fuses soldered onto the positive side of each 18650 . The fuses come with long tails that have to be trimmed, so before soldering began I had to trim one side of each fuse to shorten it before attaching i to the 18650. The other side is then soldered onto the busbar. once I solder the fuse to the busbar I then trimmed the excess fuse tail to tidy uo the look. tomorrow is that day to get the 320P 14S setup in its temporary position and see out it behaves. This weekend I risk life and limb to try weld a frame together that will hold the whole pack up inside the server cabinet....
    5 points
  43. Hi guys, based on the fact that many forum users are trying to understand how to use Pylontech batteries efficiently, I've extracted some of the internal configuration values. It's from a stack of 8xUS3000. What instantly catched my eye are especially these values. So I added a couple of my comments and thougths: Total Num : 8 //Number of maximum daisy-chained bricks supported by the firmware. Present Num : 8 //Number of actually daisy-chained (RS485) bricks. Shut time : 72.0 H //If the brick is not charged/discharged for 3 days, it will auto-power off. Balance Volt : 30 mV Balance Start : 3360 mV //Looks like the BMS is able start balancing cells at this voltage it's not //a static top-balancing, as I know that the BMS chip is able to stop balancing //at a much higher voltage, if all the cells are at roughly the same voltage level. Recommend chg voltage : 53250 mV //This is what inverters like Axpert are reading //from the BMS and using as CC. Over VoltageR : 51000 mV //Strange, that this is triggered at 51V, given //the recommended CC=53.2V. High VoltageR : 52500 mV High Voltage : 53900 mV //Just 650mV of margin between recommended CC=53.2V and alarm. Over Voltage : 54000 mV //Just 750mV of margin between recommended CC=53.2V and panic. A complete list goes here. Please note that the column "Battery" means actually a CELL while the column "Power" means a single US3000 BRICK: Protect Attribution --------------------------------- Item Battery Power Over Voltage : 3700 54000 mV Over VoltageR : 3600 51000 mV High Voltage : 3650 53900 mV High VoltageR : 3500 52500 mV Low Voltage : 3050 46000 mV Low VoltageR : 3100 47000 mV Under Voltage : 2900 44500 mV Under VoltageR : 3250 49000 mV Sleep Voltage : 2500 38000 mV Charging OT : 61000 61000 mC Charging OTR : 55000 55000 mC Charging HT : 59000 59000 mC Charging HTR : 55000 55000 mC Charging LT : -9000 -9000 mC Charging LTR : -5000 -5000 mC Charging UT : -11000 -11000 mC Charging UTR : -5000 -5000 mC Discharging OT : 61000 61000 mC Discharging OTR : 55000 55000 mC Discharging HT : 59000 59000 mC Discharging HTR : 55000 55000 mC Discharging LT : -9000 -9000 mC Discharging LTR : -5000 -5000 mC Discharging UT : -11000 -11000 mC Discharging UTR : -5000 -5000 mC Charging OC : 102000 mA Charging OC Alarm : 50000 mA Charging OC AlarmR : 40000 mA Discharging OC : -100000 mA Discharging OC Alarm : -50000 mA Discharging OC AlarmR : -45000 mA OC Delay : 15000 mS OC Release : 60000 mS Charging OC2 : 200000 mA Discharging OC2 : -200000 mA OC2 Delay : 100 mS OC2 Release : 60000 mS Discharging SC : -400000 mA SC Delay : 0 mS SC Release : 60000 mS Charging Max Cur : 10000 mA Balance Start : 3360 mV Balance Volt : 30 mV Shut time : 72.0 H BUV/PUV time : 2400 S Sleep ctrl state : OFF Sleep every day StartTime : 20:00 EndTime : 08:00 HwSleepInfo HwSleepStatus : OFF HwSleepTime : 6 S HwWakeupTime : 60 S Data Save every day StartTime : 00:00 EndTime : 23:59 Save Interval : 1800 S Power System Information --------------------------------- System is idle Total Num : 8 Present Num : 8 Sleep Num : 0 System Volt : 49381 mV System Curr : -367 mA System RC : 352367 mAH System FCC : 585266 mAH System SOC : 60 % System SOH : 99 % Highest voltage : 3294 mV Average voltage : 3292 mV Lowest voltage : 3290 mV Highest temperature : 23000 mC Average temperature : 21875 mC Lowest temperature : 21000 mC Recommend chg voltage : 53250 mV Recommend dsg voltage : 47000 mV Recommend chg current : 296000 mA Recommend dsg current : -296000 mA Hope this helps all the young scientists that are developing their own monitoring and control solution for the batteries and inverters Youda
    5 points
  44. Best service from the Powerforum store. Steve gave great advice, knew his products well. I Placed an order for a Sunsynk inverter to replace my old Imeon inverter, it arrived the next day after completing the payment. All I can say is excellent service and I'm very happy, I had a few hiccups during the install and Steve was only to happy to assist. Thank you very much Steve.
    5 points
  45. It will happen every 48 or 72 hours (Cant remember ) if you dont discharge your batteries. It does happen in battery backup systems without PV panels and self consumption. The alarm is not serious, but it remains annoying. I found a site a while back explaining what in the firmware causes this, bu cant seem to find it now. EDIT: Wait here it is. its under the Victron Q&A section.
    5 points
  46. Luminous

    Youda's off-grid LAB

    Every time I see there is a new update on this thread I open it with the hope that there is a few new pics to check out the lab. But each time I am left with disappointment...
    5 points
  47. Bernardf

    sunsynk install

    These are the minimums that the inverter looks at in order for it to decide whether to use battery power or grid power to supplement available PV to power the loads (so during load shedding these minimums are not applicable as there is no grid power). In my example, from 09:00 to 12:00 the inverter will not use battery power if the actual SoC is less than 85%. So if actual SoC is 70% at 09:30, it will power loads with excess PV (whats left over from what the battery is pulling from PV to charge) + grid. If actual SoC is 90% at 11:00, it will use PV + battery, but it will stop discharging the battery when it is down to 85%. From 12:00 to 17:00 it will use PV + grid. After 17:00 it will start using the battery, but at 85% it will use grid power, etc. As for your question, please see the picture below. The value you enter at 06:00 will depend on your preferences. If you put 100%, you will just use PV + grid from 06:00 to 17:00, and only use your battery in the 23:00 to 06:00 period. If you put 30% at 06:00, your battery will still charge from PV up to 100%, but throughout the day it might be discharged and re-charged a little bit multiple times if your loads are higher than available PV. If the minimum is too low in the afternoon you have to consider that you might be caught out by loadshedding, for example if you have big loads in the late afternoon on a cloudy day, you could sit at 30% SoC at 16:55 (thinking that you'll grid charge after 17:00). Then Eskom might move up a stage and you have unplanned load shedding without sunlight and with only 30% battery. That's why my minimums are quite high for the early evening.
    5 points
  48. late to the party but brought my own drinks so will hang around in the parking lot...and in the spirit of "give a man a fish blah blah... but teach him to hot wire a car..." EDIT: @Darrenf noticed I bombarded you previously with my rambling, you are welcome to ask for more clarification/explanation Don't worry about total household consumption since you only want to power a couple of very specific things. Ideally get some form of power meter (about R500 from what ever your flavour of online shop)... .or less ideal check each "appliance" for the label that shows you the power rating (like a 2000W kettle).... or search online for general estimates since many appliances don't actually list the power rating (my TV does not... but I checked my 47" (OLD school, not OLED) TV, AV amplifier, android TV box thingi, and B315 router all combined average about 125W). Add all the various power requirements up and you will probably not even pass 500W (but if possible check your own numbers). So you could probably get by with a 500-800W inverter. Now multiply the total power requirement by hours you want to power it for. 4h * 500W =2000Wh - this is technically how much energy you will need from a battery to power these things. Because energy conversion is not perfect and to allow some extra room, add an efficiency factor of 80%.... devide the 2000Wh by 0.8... 2000Wh/0.8 = 2500Wh will be a safer number to work with. Here is where things can seem to become too technical but soldier on...., batteries will specify their voltage (12V, 24V, 48V most common) and their storage ability (in either Amp hour (Ah) or Watt hour (Wh)). Lithium batteries often specify the capacity in Wh and lead acid batteries in Ah. So how do you decide if a given battery will be "big" enough? Lithium just compare the Wh numbers. For lead acid (like the adds posted in this thread) take YOUR Wh number and devide it by the listed battery voltage. The first add has a single 12V 100Ah battery. So...2500Wh/12V = 208Ah. You will need a 208Ah 12V lead acid battery to power 500W for 4 hours - so a single battery like the one add will not be enough since it is a 100Ah battery. You can connect two 100Ah batteries in parallel then you will have a 200Ah but still 12V battery, so two of those batteries might be needed (or maybe two 60Ah batteries?....read on first). The second add says it comes with 2 batteries.... but if you check the specifications you will likely find that the inverter works on 24V (the two batteries are connected in series), so you have a 100Ah 24V battery (even though it is made with two 100Ah 12V batteries).... will the 2 batteries be big enough?... 2500Wh/24V = 104Ah... so this is closer. BUT lead acid batteries do not have a very long total life before they "break" if you tend to use more than 50% of their capacity. So if looking at lead acid battery systems you will make life simpler if you take your power requirement and double it from the start. 2500Wh * 2 = 5000Wh.... 5000Wh/12V~400Ah.... or 5000Wh/24V~200Ah. So whether you go with 12V or 24V you will need at least four 100Ah batteries (or eight 50Ah batteries or two 200Ah batteries). Lithium batteries will generally let you use about 90% of their capacity but lithium is heavy on the pocket (depending how you do your sums) I attached an excel sheet which can help you play around with some numbers. Change the battery voltage and time (in red font) as you need/want and add your appliances+watts in the yellow columns to the list. Since this is about load shedding you should also look at things lile time available to recharge the batteries (the sheet will show you how much time you need depending on the charger capacity to recharge the battery). Use at own risk (do not use it to make calculations to power grandma's iron lung) Any of the mentioned systems should meet your inverter requirement but I suspect you will end up with a flat battery often and/or have to buy new batteries after a couple of months. The "off-the-shelf" solutions can generally be made up cheaper by just combining everything yourself. I would personally not install the Axpert inverter laying flat though (like in the add)... pretty sure the unit thermal regulation was designed around a vertical install. If you can change a plug on a toaster you should be able to make up a system - especially for your listed needs. If not comfortable doing that - no shame in that (and stay out of the DB!). Another option to the miriad of "ready made" UPS type systems that you can look at in your budget is something like a DIY victron multiplus 12/800 inverter charger (R8500-9500) combined with a second life Mecer 200Ah/2500Wh 12V lithium battery (R6400-R7500). Add a victron Mk3 USB cable (R1200) so you can make some changes to the inverter settings from a laptop. Get a battery place to make you up some 25mm2 cable with properly crimped lugs, add a fuse between battery and inverter, put it on trolley in a box (make sure the battery terminals are at least covered) if you want and you should have the lightest, least intrusive system that should meet your power needs in terms of inverter power, fast enough charger for most load shedding scenarios, and with a bit of careful load management your total storage capacity should be enough. The axpert type systems definitely are lower cost and simpler (no extra cable/laptop needed for changing settings) and you have a screen to see what is happening. Especially the 3000W inverters give you more options to power something like a kettle if you really need to (not gonna do that with a 800W any inverter). The axpert type systems also generally add the option out of the box that you can add solar panels later without needing any other bits than solar panels, solar cable and solar fuse/disconnects. If you think/gamble that load shedding will only be around now-and-again for a day or two and you want to keep this grudge purchase as cheap as possible, then also consider just battery, a separate smallish inverter and a loose battery charger. (keep charger connected to battery, when load shedding comes around, hook up the inverter... when load shedding goes away again for 3 months... put inverter in cupboard). Here you will just lose out on the automatic/"seemless" switch over when load shedding happens that you get with the axpert/multiplus type systems. If going axpert type system - try and make sure it is an original voltronic produced inverter (quality and support on the clones seems somewhat iffy). last thing... Just a note on having any system next to the TV... all these systems contain fans that switch on at least when charging the battery at a high rate and possibly when powering the load... you could find that it bothers you if right next to the TV. whoop-whooop...that's the sound of the police... off I go.. LoadShed_Calc.xlsx
    5 points
  49. Doug

    Geyserwise PV conversion

    I was given a link to this forum by Richard Mackay who thought I would be interested in the topic. After reading through the posts it would appear that no one on this forum has used, or owns, the Geyserwise product. We lost our house in the 2017 Knysna fires but rebuilt on the same site in 2018. In the process, having always being interested in the solar topics, I decided to invest in the Geyserwise system for the new build. I have found, over the last two years, that the system does what it says on the box! The installed system is as follows: 1) Panel orientation, North East 2) Panels set flat on the roof with a pitch of 30 degrees. 3) Panels, Renesola standard 250 watt, 3off. 4) Geyser 150l Kwikhot mounted vertically on South wall. 5) Standard geyser blanket fitted. 6) Element Geyserwise dual AC2.2kW/DC(8-72volt) 7) DC element set to a maximum of 60 degrees. 8) I have installed a voltmeter and ammeter on the DC input to the geyser so that I can see what is going on. 9) Electricity availability charge roughly R4.00 per day. 10) Electricity charges are roughly R2.00 per kW. My personal details are: 1) Retired. 2) 2 persons in the house. 3) Hot water is used for showering(no bath in the house) , generally once a day in the evening. hand washing etc when necessary and sink duties 2 times a day. We have no dishwasher, never have had. 4) No domestic help. 5) Cooking is carried out using a combination of induction hob combined with two gas burners and a double oven. My wife does a fair amount of baking. 6) We have two cooked meals a day, full English breakfast and lunch. We do not eat out a lot. 7) There is one large fridge/freezer unit. 8) All lighting is LED. 9) We have no electric space heaters. I have tried to insulate the new house as well as possible and our climate is fairly mild. 10) I have a number of fair size machines in my workshop. I am sketching this all out as a previous poster has mentioned, quite correctly, your power consumption depends entirely on your lifestyle and without this information you cannot make an informed assessment! Also, as someone has posted the solar salesmen are salesmen…. Because of my interest in solar water heating I kept a detailed record of power consumption in the previous house. The long term average was 13kW per day. With the Geyserwise system installed our household power consumption is now between 7 and 8 kW per day during summer and 9 to 10kw per day in winter. From the above detail I am saving approximately R5.00 per day in winter and R9.00 in summer. In retrospect I would consider an additional panel to support the winter power generation. This power would however go to waste in summer?
    5 points
  50. Good afternoon Tsa As per SANS 10142:2006 the maximum allowable current for PVC insulated cables in a single phase installation when the cable is enclosed in conduit fixed to a wall or trunking fixed to a wall are as follows. For Multi-Phase the currents are lower. For GP cable - That is the individual Black, Red, Blue, White, Yellow, Yellow and Green cables which are not bundled together with a second insulation over the individual cores and with 1 solid core or multiple thick strands 1.5 mm2: 17.5A, 2.5 mm2: 24A, 4.0 mm2: 32A, 6.0 mm2: 41A, 10.0 mm2: 57A, 16.0 mm2: 76A, 25.0 mm2: 101A For Surfix and Twin and Earth - A cable with more than 1 cores with 1 solid core or multiple thick strands individually insulated with a second insulation over the individual cores 1.5 mm2: 16.5A, 2.5 mm2: 23A, 4.0 mm2: 30A, 6.0 mm2: 38A, 10.0 mm2: 52A, 16.0 mm2: 69A, 25.0 mm2: 90A The maximum cable operating temperature are not allowed to exceed 70 degree Celsius, if the temperature exceeds 70 degree Celsius a thicker cable must be used. Cabtyre -A flexible cable with thin strands used for appliances, power tools, extension leads etc are not allowed in a DB. The gap between the clamp of the MCB and the start of the insulation may not exceed 2mm. There is also a limit of the number of cables entering or leaving an MCB and that limit is 3. Another point that is misunderstood is that the MCB protects the cable and not the load supplied by the cable. If a cable leaving the DB is joined and the cable that is joined is thicker or thinner than the other cable then the MCB must be rated for the thinner cable, for example a gate motor is to be installed and the cable leaving the house is 2.5 mm2 but you cannot get a 2.5 mm2 cable only 1.5 mm2 is available then the MCB must be rated for the 1.5mm2 cable. Circuits are not allowed to be mixed on the MCB's eg Lights and Socket outlets on the same MCB. Open spaces in the cover of the DB must be closed off so that you are protected from a electric shock and to keep insects, bugs, spiders, bees and wasps out of the DB. MCB's must be marked with indelible ink or a proper label which is not easily removed. If a DB is supplied by another DB then the sub DB and the supplying DB must be properly marked the same way MCB's are marked. A Switch Dis-connector (isolator) must disconnect both L & N for single phase installations and all P's & N for multi-phase installations. A 2 pole or 4 pole MCB are not allowed to be used as a switch dis-connector (isolator). A MCB must trip all P's for multi-phase installations if there is a over current in any of the phases. An Earth leakage must disconnect both L & N for single phase installations and all P's & N for multi-phase installations PS CB is short for Miniature Circuit Breaker.
    5 points
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