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Bobster

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Bobster last won the day on January 5

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  1. No, but those are annualised figures and some places get more cloud than others.
  2. You could always change plans and go live in Kuruman or Hotazel. Then you will have plenty of PV.
  3. How is this app set up? It can't know about cost, it knows about consumption. So there will be a parameter to see a kw/h costs X and the app/device will do a simple calculation. Also the tariff your municipality applies will escalate. IE for me the first 350 kw/h a month are the cheapest. Then for 351 to 500 I pay more and so on. The app probably isn't taking that into account either. And then there may be other fees like we have in Johannesburg where post-paying customers get hit with one flat fee for provision of a connection, a second for managing your account, plus a "demand management"
  4. Here's a map of PV power available across SA. Note that it increases as you move NW. Upington is PV heaven. Durban and the South Coast are not as good in this regard as Johannesburg. The Lowveld isn't Durban but it isn't Johannesburg either (let alone Upington). The mistake I made when I bought my system and did some calculations to see if it would pay for itself is to forget that sometimes we have overcast days and all this solar stuff doesn't work so well. When the sun shines in Jo'burg it is nice and bright, but we have our gloomy days as well and right now we're in a prolonge
  5. I did say I am doff, didn't I. So it can't just use PV? It has to have batteries and have them discharging through the inverter?
  6. I know this has come up on this forum before, but I am lekker doff and also forgetful. Are you saying that a proper hybrid inverter, installed without batteries, will continue to provide power during an outage?
  7. What do you do when there's a run of overcast weather? On bright days I could run my whole house off the grid, but in overcast weather (and we've had a lot in Gauteng lately) I fear I will run out of steam at some point.
  8. Remember that "on" doesn't mean the compressor is running. Mine is on from 6:15 to 9:00, but the compressor does not run for all of that time. I just checked data from June last year. Run time in the morning was 10 to 15 minutes longer.
  9. Here's the data from my system this morning Green line is SOC, maroon line is the load. You can see my heat pump turning on at 6:15. At that point the water is relatively cool and so the compressor kicks in immediately. Then it turns off about 7:20. For all this time we have no useful PV and you can see the SOC line drops more steeply when the compressor is running. Later on (after I showered) there is another quick burst from the compressor, looking higher because the kettle was on as well. By that time we have some PV coming in but still draw some juice from the battery. All through
  10. I run mine on the essential circuits and get away with it. The first run is at 6:15 in the AM when I am not getting much PV and so this runs off the battery. Circumstances will dictate. When I asked my installer about running the heat pump on the essential loads they said that we could try and we'd have to watch the data from the inverter and see if we got away with it or not. We do get away with it. Mine is "on" for about 2 hours in the morning, but the compressor doesn't run all that time. There is no yes or no answer here. See earlier advice from @Gerrie: You can try to back up t
  11. This depends on inverter and settings. Certainly my system runs the non-essential loads off of PV when it can. EG today with the pool pump running for 5 hours I have used a total of 0.5 kw/h from the grid. My pump is on the non-essential side of the DB. I would expect that most modern hybrid inverters are able to do the same. Well I'm not an expert (not any kind of electrician) but I think you have answered your own question: You'll be OK as long as you don't export.
  12. You would need to split your DB into essential (backed up) and non-essential loads. When there is an outage you will lose the non-essential loads. My favourite topic: Get an updated COC and notify your insurers. Troubles with your meter are going to depend on what brand of meter you have and whether or not you export any surplus PV. To make the most of any of this type of system you have to adjust your way of life to fit. Literally make hay whilst the sun is shining.
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