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Inverter Frenzy


Willie123

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There are some many different inverters marketed today. It confuses me what to choose. I have 600 watt requirement. I'm being told that u need to triple it to have enough headroom. Is this correct ? Hence I'm looking at a 3Kw inverter, apparently 24V 200Ah lithium battery  (hubble apparently best?)  PV Input.? All these factors to consider vs Axpert Kodak, Voltron, kodak , mecer etc. The list goes on! Sunsynk is too expensive. How do you choose? 

The choice of Inverter is the problem. Pure sinewave? Parallel operation? Etc Help!!

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2 hours ago, Willie123 said:

There are some many different inverters marketed today. It confuses me what to choose. I have 600 watt requirement. I'm being told that u need to triple it to have enough headroom. Is this correct ? Hence I'm looking at a 3Kw inverter, apparently 24V 200Ah lithium battery  (hubble apparently best?)  PV Input.? All these factors to consider vs Axpert Kodak, Voltron, kodak , mecer etc. The list goes on! Sunsynk is too expensive. How do you choose? 

The choice of Inverter is the problem. Pure sinewave? Parallel operation? Etc Help!!

Hi Willie, with Sunsynk and Kodak you not only have local product support in SA, but you will also enjoy support here on forum.  Unfortunately there are Axpert clones in the market for cheaper but you will be on your own. 

If you have done your homework and calculated that 600w is good, then its good. But it probably would be better to go for 24 v battery atleast, and inverter 2,2.4 or even 3 kw. Make sure if you are interested in pv, that the pv input voltage range is in line with solar panel configuration that you want. Lots of members here that would be able to assist you. 

Also make sure that your battery is compatible with choice of inverter. 

So choose your inverter and size your battery an pv accordingly. 

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2 hours ago, Willie123 said:

Pure sinewave?

At least that one is fairly easy today. All but the cheapest junk is pure sine wave these days; it only adds a few dollars to make it pure sine wave. There are plenty of complaints about "modified sine wave" (really a very crude square wave) inverters posing problems, so unless your budget constraints are severe, I would stick to pure sine wave.

Most of the brands that you mentioned are made in the same factory by Voltronic Power: Meter, Kodak (though not all Kodak branded inverters are Voltronic, most are), RCT. But the hazard is: there are many clones out there, and to the untrained eye (such as yours, I suspect), they look the same, and have much the same specifications. But the quality can be vastly different! If you're interested, I wrote a post years ago about how to spot the clones: Do I Own a Clone?

Voltronic Power make inverters that I regard as "just barely adequate". I own two of them myself, and have had little trouble other than when lightning struck nearby, but I did pre-emptively replace some parts (MOSFETs and capacitors) at the start. They're pretty good value for what you pay for them. Clone are usually cheaper, but the quality is usually poor.

Another thing going for the Voltronic models is that there are traced schematic diagrams, some firmware updates are available, including patched firmware to fix various glitches, and service manuals. Service from resellers is patchy at best, but there is some support from readers of this forum.

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The best option is to go for a 5kw or even a 8kw unit with lithium batteries that can be paralleled. Feedback to the grid is not so critical. Remote monitoring of the system is something that sunsync seems to do well at.

There is ICC software and one or two others for the voltronic types as well. Also make sure the lithium battery communications is compatible with the choice of inverter.

The problem with solar is it’s a bit like buying a car, which is expensive. However if you are only going to use the car 3 times a month it’s very expensive. It’s better to use it everyday while the sun shines and get a great return on investment. Free power.
 

Use prepaid at night and have the system for backup at night, with a lite load when on battery. Soon you will probably want to add more panels and batteries as you see how well solar works and how much it saves you.
 

also until Eskom adds more capacity to the grid load shedding is here to stay and get worse. Also with all the cable theft and vandalism often power fails to restore after load shedding due to cable theft or infrastructure failing when being powered up, as it is old, and not well maintained.

Make sure to get a Good installer to show you installations they have done and chat to their installed customers, what they like about the systems, problems they had etc.. Be sure to get a COC as well. Withhold payment in full until this is received.

Have fun with the research :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you to those who responded! Fortunately I geld back on a final decision. Instead I Googled a lot, asked around, spoke to technicians, etc. And gained a lot of understanding as well as sorting out my current requirement and how it may change going forward. Currently I'm considering a solution, 5kw Luxpower(support in CT) and 3.5kw lithium battery. This fits my budget comfortably.  Parallel operation supported(inverter and battery) and enough umph to add Panels later. Thanks to all and this Forum, who assisted to make an informed decision.

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