Jump to content

My Axpert 3000kVA is sick


drlizau

Recommended Posts

This has been switching to the mains at less than max current draw - maybe 1200W sent it into overload when I checked. We assumed that it was old and tired, because its been working all day almost every day for nearly 7 years.

Today it decided in the middle of a dull rainy afternoon to have a major complaint about the work health and safety conditions and just shut down about 1600hrs. There was a single green light flashing on the box, and no response to any of the buttons. Starting a fault finding procedure the load was independently switched to the mains, then the battery supply disconnected from the inverter. This jarred the recalcitrant inverter back to life and it started to complain about a fault. Reconnecting the batteries it appears to be OK but it has been left out of service rather than retest late on Sunday afternoon.

Questions

Is it worth trying to keep this inverter going?

Should I just buy another inverter? I was pricing a suitable Victron for a replacement, are there other suggestions?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, drlizau said:

Is it worth trying to keep this inverter going?

If you have the means financially to upgrade it will be a good choice to upgrade to 5kw or better 8kw

1 hour ago, drlizau said:

Should I just buy another inverter? I was pricing a suitable Victron for a replacement, are there other suggestions?

I would personally go for either Sunsynk or Deye nothing against Victron just expensive the Multiplus are good inverters but 35k for 5kw a bit steep then you need a suitable Mppt as well so for me 5kw or 8kw Sunsynk will be a  better choice. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might be the battery that is getting tired, not the inverter. Though very likely original non-upgraded capacitors would be getting dry about now.

If you're handy with electronics, BritishRacingGreen and I (and no doubt others) know the "usual suspects" to replace. You might be able to get a lot more life out of the inverter, IF that's the problem.

What I'm thinking is that perhaps the battery's internal resistance is getting high with age, and at moderate load a pulse load like a fridge starting might push the inverter into working harder to compensate for low battery voltage. As I type this, it seems somewhat far fetched.

But as a matter of interest, what battery are you using, and what is its age?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, drlizau said:

A bank of lead acid gel cels, now 5 years old, and they have been run very conservatively, only down to 80% charge, using a quality battery monitor. Attached is the one year graph from Cacti.

This graph doesn't tell much. What would be needed is an instant graph of battery voltage when applying a heavy load, i.e. a kettle. I suspect Coulomb is right that the battery is tired after 5 years of service.

Wow: "Axpert 3000kVA" !  that's 3MVA! (3 millions VA).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Beat said:

This graph doesn't tell much.

Well, it says that it was well looked after.

1 hour ago, Beat said:

What would be needed is an instant graph of battery voltage when applying a heavy load, e.g. a kettle.

Yes, that would be helpful. If only to eliminate that possibility. I'd hate for drlizau to buy a new inverter and find that it doesn't fix the problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Coulomb said:

Well, it says that it was well looked after.

Yes indeed. And since it is the inverter that takes that care, it tells that the inverter is working fine at least in charging mode. In my understanding inverters either work or don't, but not sometimes do and sometimes not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Beat said:

In my understanding inverters either work or don't, but not sometimes do and sometimes not.

Inverters like all electronic gadgets use 100s of components and any one could fail.  The symptoms can be extremely diverse and there are many failures that can go undetected for years.  For instance, there are many safety and protection circuits that can fail and the end-user would be blissfully unaware.  MOVs are an example of this.  As they are called upon to perform their duty (absorb over-voltage spikes) so they deteriorate over time and finally go open circuit.

One would expect that a certain model has a few weak spots and typical failures.  This is correct, but there are often out of the ordinary failures that surprise repair technicians who know the model inside-out.

Even firmware bugs can go unnoticed for years and then get ignored or the end-users accept to live with them.  Manufactures too keen to convince the user to pay for the new "improved" model with even more bugs and suspect design. Equipment forever chases more bling, specmanship and questionable functionality that often is not needed and just over-complicates the design.

There must be more manhours being placed in producing WiFi or Bluetooth enabled devices, with a seamless user interface, to allow an occasional voltage to be changed from the smart phone, than hours put into designing and qualifying the real hardware circuits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2023/04/30 at 10:00 PM, Beat said:

This graph doesn't tell much. What would be needed is an instant graph of battery voltage when applying a heavy load, i.e. a kettle. I suspect Coulomb is right that the battery is tired after 5 years of service.

Wow: "Axpert 3000kVA" !  that's 3MVA! (3 millions VA).

There might be time tomorrow to do some checks.

As the inverter wouldn't run the air fryer before at 1200W, I wouldn't expect it to run the kettle drawing 1800W.

and yea, it is a magic inverter, does more than the supply authority does ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2023/05/01 at 7:16 PM, Beat said:

Yes indeed. And since it is the inverter that takes that care, it tells that the inverter is working fine at least in charging mode. In my understanding inverters either work or don't, but not sometimes do and sometimes not.

The inverter is not used in charging mode, because it doesn't handle the amount of incoming power. It's a Victron system charging the batteries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, drlizau said:

because it doesn't handle the amount of incoming power.

What do you mean by that? Could you draw us a schematic of your system and indicate the inverter type and the size of the battery?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had similar issue with my inverter on gels . My gels were 4 years + also runing every day all day on solar and it got to the situation were the inverter would just shut down if an microwave was used in load shedding and in the day on rainy days the inverter would switch to utility if the kettle or micro was used but the gels under low loads could still run for hours

. After moving to lithium with 100amp discharge no more shut downs . 

So check for volt drops on the DC side when the inverter is under load 

Edited by GMAC
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2023/05/03 at 7:06 PM, Beat said:

What do you mean by that? Could you draw us a schematic of your system and indicate the inverter type and the size of the battery?

We don't need a schematic. The Axpert MPPT is old, not the mark 2 which can handle 80A incoming. Right now I can't find a reference for the old one, but we needed an 85A capable solar controller. So we have a Victron 150 85.

So when looking for a new inverter, I don't need one with charging abilities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2023/05/05 at 1:27 AM, GMAC said:

I had similar issue with my inverter on gels . My gels were 4 years + also runing every day all day on solar and it got to the situation were the inverter would just shut down if an microwave was used in load shedding and in the day on rainy days the inverter would switch to utility if the kettle or micro was used but the gels under low loads could still run for hours

. After moving to lithium with 100amp discharge no more shut downs . 

So check for volt drops on the DC side when the inverter is under load 

This morning we put the load back on the Axpert inverter and ran a load up to 900W for about 10 minutes. No concerns. The gel cells did not drop their voltage under load and each of the 12 individual cells was within range on testing. During the test period the freezer motor started up successfully.

Next job will be to inspect the inside of the inverter for signs of deterioration before making a decision on replacement or not.

Forum members have suggested some brands of inverters to look at, so I'll research those while waiting for the OM to decide to check the internals of the inverter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...