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Hi all

I spent some time reading through the different posts & topics on the forum and it so great to see, from installers to solar newbies interacting. That also made me realize that not everyone knows the full range of products in the SMA basket. And I do think it's maybe a good place to start with. 

SMA definitely has the largest range of solar & battery inverters available. All their inverters are modular and most of them can work together. For instance, you can start with a 1.5kW Sunnyboy on a single-phase grid, and eventually add so many inverters that you end up with a 360kWp off-grid three-phase island setup, as an example. Also remember that SMA does AC-coupling, which means they don’t offer DC charge controllers, only inverters, even in an off-grid setup. 

Please see the attached picture of the products SMA currently has to offer in our region. 

Lets start with the single phase grid-tie inverters:

        Name: SMA Sunny Boy

        Products range:1.5kW & 2.5kW VL-40 (single MPPT)

                                 3kW - 6kW AV-41 (note the 41, that is the latest versions) (Dual MPPT)

Notes: these inverters are single phase and can be used as grid-tie or in an off-grid setup. They can also be used on a three-phase grid for individual phase control.

Three-phase grid-tie inverters:

                Name: SMA Sunny Tripower (all Dual MPPT)

                Product range:3kW – 6kW 3AV-40

                                          8kW – 10kW 3AV-40

                                          15kW, 20kW & 25kW TL-30

                                           50kW Core 1

Notes: the 3AV-40 is the new range that has just been released, all with WiFi capabilities. The TL-20 has been discontinued. The TL-30 is the commercial range which are the ones everyone is familiar with. The Core 1 is our newest addition for rooftop & ground applications. As above, these inverters can be used in a grid-tied application or three-phase off-grid.

Three-phase Grid-tie inverters ( HighPower Peak)

These inverters are used for commercial and utility scale projects. They are setup and commissioned differently than the SMA Sunny Tripower that most of you are used to, and they are not compatible with them in the same system.

Sunny Highpower Peak 1 (SHP 75)

Sunny Highpower Peak 2 (SHP 100) – to be released towards end of Q2 2018

Sunny Highpower Peak 3 (SHP 150) – to be released beginning of Q2 2018

Notes: These inverters are single MPPT units and require solar combiner boxes. These inverters are also not compatible with the SMA Datamanager or Clustercontroller and therefor need a SMA Inverter Manager.

 

Battery/ Off-grid Inverters.

Name: SMA Sunny Island

DC Voltage: 48V

Product Range: SI 4.4/6/8kW -12

These inverters are battery inverters that have two AC connections. There are 3 currently in the new range.

Notes: The new Sunny Island -12 has built-in WiFi, which means no more Sunny Remote Control and they also now have built in Webconnect. Which allows you to remotely monitor them without the need for additional modules.

 

High Voltage Battery  Inverters.

Name: SMA Sunny Boy Storage

DC Voltage: 100v -550V

Product Range: SBS 2.5kW, 3.7kW, 5kW & 6kW -10

These inverters are high voltage battery inverters that have a single AC connection. These inverters are designed for increased self-consumption.

Notes: There is only one compatible battery that can be used with the SBS, BYD High Voltage. These inverters also have WiFi and Webconnect. There is an additional product that can be bought to use the Sunny Boy Storage as a backup inverter.

On the next blog I will start explaining how AC coupling works with SMA products.

Bis zum nächsten Mal

www.rensol.co.za

[email protected] 

 

SMA Portfolio 2018.png

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9 hours ago, Stefan S said:

Name: SMA Sunny Island

I'm only curious as to how this one will fare in relation to the issue we discussed elsewhere, about what is required if you form an island. I wonder if the SunnyIsland has a similar topology to the others, that is to say that it remains on to power the essential loads, and only disconnects the grid to form an island.

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13 hours ago, plonkster said:

I'm only curious as to how this one will fare in relation to the issue we discussed elsewhere, about what is required if you form an island. I wonder if the SunnyIsland has a similar topology to the others, that is to say that it remains on to power the essential loads, and only disconnects the grid to form an island.

There are various ways to setup a Sunny Island (SI). 

Firstly we have an Off-grid setup. This is for the standard off-grid, but also for UPS mode. This allows you to have an uninterrupted power supply should there be a power failure or the grid is not suitable for normal operation, like we are currently experiencing in SA. the grid will be on AC2 and the loads on AC1. In UPS setup, the inverter will supply power within 15ms and disconnect from the grid. should you have the Sunnyboy inverter within this 'Island', it will continue working and supply power to your loads and also to the SI to charge the batteries (should there be enough PV to do so). then there is the NRS that doesn't accept the SI capability to do so (or they dont believe us) and therefor you still need a 'ISLAND BOX' that disconnects the grid and keeps this setup completely separate from the grid. There is suppliers selling these complete boxes that work with the Sunny Island and are NRS approved. In an real off-grid setup you will have your loads on AC1 and your generator on AC2, which you can call in with one of the relays. you can use the relay to do loadshedding, put on battery room fan/aircon, give an alarm when batteries are to low or whatever you desire. 

The other setup is on-grid. Here you would need a contactor on the mains of the house or DB you want to supply power to. The sunnyisland is then connected only through AC2 to the DB/loads. Should the utility power fail, the Contacter will pull out, creating an 'Island' then the sunnyisland will power up and supply power to the loads through the AC2. This setup is not uninterrupted, and this changeover could takes a few minutes. The pro's of this setup is you can use the 'self consumption' mode on your SI and the sunnyisland will use batteries in conjunction with solar during normal running. and how do you then control feeding back to the grid?  through the home manager/ energy meter. This setup is used alot in countries example Europe where the customer only has an average of 3 hours of power failures per annum, and he would like to store energy in his batteries and use it tonight again (increased self consumption). 

On the other hand, there is smart ways to cycle your batteries also in off-grid mode....😉

Please see attached examples of various setups. We can create very big and complex setups with the sunnyisland/s. There's alot of whitepaper written on the various connections.

i have just written another post...in the comments. Maybe i can make this the next topic. with sketches. 

 

on grid.jpg

on grid2.png

off-grid

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On 2019/02/14 at 9:45 PM, phil.g00 said:

Is this the Ziehl UFR1001E solution?

In the context of the present SANS/islanding debate I often wonder what the point of the Ziehl is anyway. The islanding issue is this: That islanding has to be a two-step process of first disconnecting the grid, making sure it is disconnected, and then connecting the backup source. It cannot be a single step where you just disconnect the grid.

The Ziehl, however, simply disconnects the grid. It is therefore not a solution to the present problem that arises from this particular interpretation of the regulations.

For all hybrid/peak-shaving solutions, the battery backup is ALREADY connected at the time that the grid goes down. The question becomes whether you can simply disconnect the grid, or if you must disconnect both the grid and the backup, make sure the grid is really open (some kind of feedback), and then re-engage the battery backup.And all this in less than 20mS.

And then the question becomes whether perhaps some/all hybrids already does this and we just didn't know (for that kind of level of detail is very hard to get to... only the engineers building and testing the stuff will know that).

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26 minutes ago, plonkster said:

For all hybrid/peak-shaving solutions, the battery backup is ALREADY connected at the time that the grid goes down. The question becomes whether you can simply disconnect the grid, or if you must disconnect both the grid and the backup, make sure the grid is really open (some kind of feedback), and then re-engage the battery backup.And all this in less than 20mS.

Yes, there seems to be an interpretation that a PV inverter is allowable with PV, but a hybrid inverter is not permitted with a battery.

It would seem to make a distinction between a battery and a PV panel.

Which are both sources of DC power and arguably indistinguishable electrically.

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51 minutes ago, phil.g00 said:

It would seem to make a distinction between a battery and a PV panel.

No... the distinction is between continuing to power loads or not. Which is why I brought up the SMA feature called SPS (secure power supply). I've never seen one of those in this country, it seems to be primarily marketed in the US, but that does the4 same thing: It continues to power some of your loads when the grid goes down, using PV as the source. The next step up from SPS is to sell the customer a SunnyIsland 🙂

I believe SPS would (should!) run into the same issues. Except it is apparently not sold here...

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  • 11 months later...

Gents,

This is right up my recent memory and I am still sorting out minor issues.

I used to have a Axpert MPPT ver II running really nicely and servicing essentials in my DB.

Non essentials directly from grid.

I have VERY limited North facing roof, so I opted for 2 SunnyBoys to supplement electricity.

Downside: IF grid goes out, I was only running off the batteries.

Lets add a SunnyIsland to get around that.

Sunny Island ver 12 needs a backup box- Add that

Sunny Home Manager ver 2.0 was needed - add that.

I am in the lucky position that I can push 100% surplus power back into the grid and receive compensation for it.

Finally got the system running - BUT when grid goes out - there is a delay of about 2 seconds before the micro grid is established by the Sunny Island - VERY annoying.

SMA is adamant that the 2 seconds delay cannot be changed. (Internet is down, radios, server, PC's ........) really not acceptable for me 

 

There is though: a light in the tunnel: I am aware of a person (unfortunately not yet being able to get in touch with him) using the EXACT same SMA kit as me except has a Tripower with three phase and three Sunny Islands also feeding into the grid and after many calls and huge frustration on his end was able to get the correct settings to have a 20 Milliseconds switch-over time.

 

@Stefan S, would you perhaps have some insight in how this config should be done?

 

Any other takers in the know to do the settings on my equipment??

 

I would love to be able to run my SMA's as a UPS, with the ability to provide my DB with solar power when the grid goes out. so the ONLY time I would need to use batteries, would be when there is no sun and the grid goes out. (This is just for the time being until I replace the Vision Lead Acid Bats) 

When I have Lithium's I will start the "Rise in self-consumption switch"

 

 

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