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COC's aren't worth poo these days!


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On 2020/02/07 at 7:57 PM, Gerrie said:

To solve that you can install a 63A single pole circuit breaker (white lever) just before or after that 63A isolator, than you are ok should you have a overload it will trip right there and easy to reset. 

I'm getting a replacement breaker for this tomorrow. Space is at a premium (as always), so an extra breaker is not really an option.

The sub-DBs have already been moved to the other side of the main breaker, once I replace the main breaker this will be compliant.

10 hours ago, KLEVA said:

If the thicker wire ties directly into the Mains (Municipal Supply) at this point then there still might not be a point for concern if there is a seperate Earth Leakage in the outside area. It is fairly common to NOT connect earth leakage from one DB board to another, since you have no idea what is going to be connected at that DB, and you don't want a earth leakage at that DB tripping a main DB earth leakage

The issue here is that there isn't sufficient overcurrent protection in this board. The individual circuits have overcurrent protection, but their individual values add up to far more than the 60A connection this house ostensibly has. There must therefore be an upstream 60A breaker somewhere... but 1) the main breaker doesn't have overcurrent protection (I missed this until Gerrie pointed it out), 2) the sub-DBs tie off BEFORE the main breaker, they should tie off after the main breaker but before the RCD (as you said), so even if the main breaker had overcurrent protection, it is still possible to overload the council line by running the sub-DBs at their full capacities (70A between the two breakers).

So yeah... that main breaker needs to be replaced. Unless there is overcurrent protection elsewhere on the premises, but I could not find it.

This DB had even more secrets. At some point the sparky that worked on it had only black wire in his toolkit. He taped up a black wire in red tape to "make" a red wire in one case, and then he wrapped another black wire in earth tape to make an earth wire. Not only that... it passed inspection (if it was inspected at all that is).

10 hours ago, isetech said:

Why would anyone in their right mind trust a seller of a property to provide a COC

Vra nou so 'n vraag! The buyer has little control. Well, I suppose you could write it into the contract. The estate agent I've used for years always use the same bug-and-electrical people, and they are very thorough. They also did my previous two houses. I made the mistake of assuming the same people did this one... I heard afterwards the seller had their own electrician.

But even that makes no sense, because the seller actually complained about the bill. The seller got their own electrician, got handed a huge bill... AND the job was not done properly. If the seller got their own sparky in order to save money... that would make sense. But not even that was the case here...

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As someone who is in the process of selling right now, I can explain this to some extent. It's not the R50 on that one item. It's the combination of R50s across everything that is suddenly inexplicabl

I fully understand and from there my opinion of rather fix your electrical installation while you live there and reap the fruit of your investment yourself rather than fix it up for the next owner.

I mean like fittings not earthed etc, those are things that should not be missed, i get there can be a mess where you can't see it,  in this case, no they weren't switching the neutral, they were

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1 minute ago, plonkster said:

This DB had even more secrets. At some point the sparky that worked on it had only black wire in his toolkit. He taped up a black wire in red tape to "make" a red wire in one case, and then he wrapped another black wire in earth tape to make an earth wire. Not only that... it passed inspection (if it was inspected at all that is).

Not standard but more common than you think, and in itself not a CoC fail, the wires just have to be clearly marked.

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Plonkster... I bought my house without a COC and had it done myself...got an inspection report done ...then got quotes to repair ...averaged out the repair cost and took it off the sale price... modified the sale agreement.

A very common thing i see ...cabtyre being used for day/night switches ...people use the earth wire as the return with a bit of red tape to indicate it is is a live wire... as kleva indicated so long as the wire is clearly marked...however there are much bigger issues in the electrical industry which need to be addressed... I will leave that for another day. 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

Dear Forum,

Slightly off topic, but a question of compliance (please move to more appropriate forum if required).

Is it compliant if the earth leakage unit is wired unconventionally with the LINE from below and the LOAD to the circuit breakers from the top?

The E / L is non-polar (does not stipulate a LOAD or LINE side) and is tripping as expected with earth faults. 
Browsing the internet, it appears not to be a problem (provided the unit does not stipulate a LINE / LOAD requirement); but would it be compliant and could a CoC be denied for this reason?

Thanks for a great forum.

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7 hours ago, RobN said:

would it be compliant and could a CoC be denied for this reason?

I have seen installations where the wires enter from the bottom, if there is no markings for line and load it might be ok, it is best to check the installation instruction on that brand of earth leakage. Most older electricians were taught the supply always on top and load always on bottom and they stick to that standard. I guess it depends on the guy that has to put his signature on the COC.

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Specific rcds are designed to be opposite. I got one like this from Livecopper. With mcbs it does not matter. Requirement is a notice on the dB outside indicating the position of live wires. 

I did it with my  3 level distribution board as it was easier with the control mcbs in the middle. 

The requirement is an isolator before the rcd unless you buy a very expensive rcd that incorporates it. 

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