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Nersa approves 9.4% electricity price hike


viper_za
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Not sure what a T105RE goes for now. But assuming it goes for R2800 a piece, we're tied for cost at cape town upper domestic rates, ignoring efficiency. That is to say, we're about 30 cents away... thumbsuck back of the envelope.

Sent from my GT-I9195 using Tapatalk

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Nope, that is just CoC charges for Bellville area, top rate

All ex VAT, bands are:
(1) 137.7050 kWh @ R 1.5430
(2) 183.6060 kWh @ R 1.5430
(3) 229.5090 kWh @ R 1.5430
(4) 191.1800 kWh @ R 1.8763 =  R2.14 incl VAT

And now the increase is coming. Lekker tye!!! :D

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yikes, you guys need to make a plan, and thats before any increase.......how do the folks survive each month, do people have spare change after paying bonds, cars and the normal stuff? i feel for you.

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Some more motivation
http://mybroadband.co.za/news/energy/157123-risk-of-load-shedding-may-increase-because-full-price-hike-not-granted-eskom.html.

Glad I'm finally up and running :)

 

Edit

Eskom CEO Brian Molefe said the decision to only approve a 9.4% electricity price increase doesn’t help Eskom’s financial sustainability and “will have operational consequences”.

“We will do our best to minimise the risk of load shedding, striking a balance with Eskom’s already depleted balance sheet,” he said in a statement.

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You know, if I think about it very hard and very long (thinking ... done) grid problems are a international saga due to population urbanization, not enough funds to build new due to escalating costs as well as funds needed elsewhere. We all are patching as best we can.

Our problem here in SA is not going to go away unless there is a massive change in thinking with the political willpower to back AND drive it.

But electricity is a very cruel and EXPENSIVE mistress to generate in bulk with wot 50% (add you own %) of the country not having electricity / cannot afford it for they are on welfare grants, have no jobs or too little income left after food accommodation not forgetting the costs someone must pay to get electricity to their houses due to infrastructure costs and all that.

And op top of all this, you need to balance the countries books ... man, someone is going to be in a wee bit of a pickle.

But, you need to grown the jobs, for that you need electricity ... (facepalm).

If you voted me as president, I would ask every homeowner and business who can, to generated their own power and as a token of my appreciation of donating X amount of kWh for free, that goes to the poor, no connection fees. Deal!?

Okay okay ... I will make SARS declare all solar equipment and batteries exempt from VAT and import duties, and if you can manufacture and buy locally, no VAT. ;)

Ag tog, dream over ... my coffee is cold.

Seriously though, there is no quick fix in the pipeline and there is no political will to push solar hard in SA. Do what you can.

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yep unfortunately you have to think of yourself and reduce your energy dependency from the state and become more self reliant. there is absolutely no chance of a short term solution to Eskoms woes & the countries in my opinion. I keep hearing a rumour that we are going to be faced with a form of water load shedding shortly as well.....

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Water, now that one is easy, and rather complicated, if it must be used for human consumption.

Why our beloved Cape Town has not made it so that seawater is used for toilets in all new areas with solar desalination plants all over installed for potable water, I do not know.

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18 hours ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

T105RE's are +- R 2 620 if I recall correctly.

I am on R 2.14 incl VAT per kWh.

In Somerset West, and I believe most of Cape Town, if you use more than 450kwh a month on average or you stay in a nice house (valued at more than R350 000) you will be on the domestic tariff. You pay more for electricity, but the step is less severe. The other tariff (for people who use less than 450kwh on average) has a very severe step once you go over 350kwh, it more than doubles.

I did the math though. Up to 600kwh, you pay about the same on both tariffs. After 600kwh, that's when it becomes significantly better to be on the "higher" domestic tariff. People think that lifeline is kind to the poor. In winter it is decidedly cruel to them: You hit month end, and suddenly electricity jumps to over R2.30 per kwh...

By my reckoning though, I pay R1.76 per kwh below 600kwh, and R2.13 above that. Rounded/truncated, there are fractions of a cent involved. Assuming your battery price there is VAT inclusive, then

225Ah, 6V, 1800 cycles to 50% iirc, so 225 * 6 * 0.5 * 1800 = 1215kwh over its lifetime. R2620/1215 = R2.15 a unit. Add in peukert inefficiency, probably closer to R2.35 a unit (add another 20 cents or so). Not sure if it makes sense to add in peukert here, that's only a factor when you recharge, so it should probably be added on to the efficiency figure of the PV side. Either way, we're there. Grid parity.

Now the 105RE is just my "reference battery". There are more expensive batteries with better cycle lifes that can do storage for under R2/kwh...

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About a year ago, I was looking at Opzs batteries from these guys:

http://www.eternity-technologies.eu/

I cannot for the life of me find links to the product anymore. In any case, they were rated 500Ah at C5 (because they are used for forklifts), and it would have cost me R26 460 ex vat for 12 of them. They are rated for 1500 cycles to 80% DoD, something like 3000 cycles to 50% if I recall. So...

24 * 500 * 0.5 * 3000 = 18 000kwh over its lifetime.

(R26460 * 1.14)/18000 = R1.68 per kwh.

This was at a time when >=600kwh on domestic cost R1.86 in Cape Town. Sadly I just didn't have 30k lying around.

So it should cost about 20% more now after the currency tanked, which is around R2 per kwh.

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Jip, THAT penny dropped this morning  for me too thanks to Plonkster - Give that man a BELLS!!!

BUTt: If you have 1270ah battery bank, make very sure you have the panels installed that can charge them. ;)

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58 minutes ago, superdiy said:

Ahhh, I should have taken the IND23's instead of the T-105REs - KWh cost is much less. :D:D:D

But that's like a 20k battery, and you need more than one... I would need 6. 120k worth of batteries. Ain't no chance in hell...

That's why the T105RE is my benchmark battery. This is the kind of thing the "average man" can actually afford. When the average man can afford a battery that is at or below grid cost, that is an important milestone. That's when "average home owners" get into the game much as those same home owners started installing solar geysers a decade ago...

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Let me see if I got the logic of this right

48V system * 450Ah (C20) * 50% DOD * 1700 Cycles = 18 360kWh

R43 000 / 18 360kWh = R2.34/kWh

However I originally paid R21 000 for the batteries which fried themselves, and another R13 000 (in conjunction with the insurance payout) so my current battery bank cost R34 000, and divided by 18 360kWh = R1.85/kWh. This is obviously excluding the new monitor and stand and other bits and pieces.

Pretty chuffed with that then, assuming of course my understanding of the calculation is correct.

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27 minutes ago, viceroy said:

Pretty chuffed with that then, assuming of course my understanding of the calculation is correct.

Just remember that this is storage cost only. Generation cost has to be added, and that's not exactly zero. What I'm thinking of is the hypothetical situation that's roughly as follows:

1. Home owner installed a large GTI and made an agreement with the supplier to feed back electricity

2. Supplier decides this arrangement no longer suits him, and lowers/cancels the FIT (feed in tariff).

3. Home owner now has oodles of power he can't use or sell.

4. Home owner decides to install battery bank and self-consume his surplus at night.

Until recently, this picture didn't make sense because storage was more than grid power. That ship is rapidly leaving the harbour :-)

(And I'm standing on the docks cheering...)

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30 minutes ago, The Terrible Triplett said:

Plonster, are these maths correct?

It is. Remember also this is a crude approximation. When a battery discharges it doesn't do so at the nominal voltage, eg a 12V battery will probably start at 12.8V and end up around 10.8V when it is empty. Mathematically speaking, you need the P(t) function (power at time t) and integrate that over the entire discharge period, and THAT will give you the total... but I suspect you're probably not going to be too far off. At 50% DoD, I would expect that your figure is going to be conservative rather than optimistic.

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On 2016/03/02 at 4:38 PM, plonkster said:

4. Home owner decides to install battery bank and self-consume his surplus at night.

Of course, this is followed by:

5. Supplier decides Home owner really ought to pay a connection fee to pay for the upkeep of the grid...

And in due time, as renewable becomes cheaper, that might lead to:

6. Home Owner goes completely off grid.

But we're a long way away from that :-)

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