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MultiPlus-II vs MultiGrid vs MultiPlus comparison


Corné
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Good day Everyone

I found this link:  https://www.victronenergy.com/upload/documents/MultiPlus-II-to-MultiGrid-and-MultiPlus-comparison-EN.pdf

Can someone maybe explain the differences to me in a very basic way?

For example:

 

image.thumb.png.4d127f43b35ae52a27b26e7260d4de01.png

When would one choose the one type over the other apart from the power differences.

Which one should you choose for a back-up and lower Eskom bill situation?

Kind regards,

Corné

 

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3 hours ago, Corné said:

When would one choose the one type over the other apart from the power differences.

Which one should you choose for a back-up and lower Eskom bill situation?

I will take a stab at this...

PMP482305000 is the multiplus II 48V/3kW/35Amp charger/32 Amp rated transfer switch "1st edition".

PMP482305010 is the multiplus II 48V/3kW/35Amp charger/32 Amp rated transfer switch new revised "2nd edition" 

... I think the differences have more to do with meeting the long list of varying grid codes in Victron's markets than one model/revision being better/worse at their core function as inverter/charger. So from what I can tell for instance the UK grid code has new(er) requirements that the original muliplus likely no longer meet and they had to make actual hardware changes to make the MPii compliant. I think much of this is around the requirements to adequately disconnect when the grid fails (anti-islanding requirements).

I doubt there will be any difference between the hardware revisions as far as "lowering eskom bill" type scenarios. But the multigrid (even the 12/3000) and multiplus ii both appear on the COCT list of approved equipment, the normal multiplus does not - so from a legal grid-tie scenario the multi-grid and multiplus ii will likely be a safer choice than the multiplus.

(looking at the spec sheets there are some smaller "cosmetic" differences like bat/temp sense between the two versions)

3 hours ago, Corné said:

Can someone maybe explain the differences to me in a very basic way?

As far as the diagrams go.... 1st one has 6 triangles, second one has 5, and third one has 4.... 😉. I say this in jest and is waaayyyy above my knowledge level but am pretty sure the "triangles" will point to how they are setup internally in terms of relays/switches, which should make more sense when you look at what input/output you might want to have connected to which other input/output while the gird is connected and when it's not.

The clever okes will hopefully pop in with corrections and more useful info... 

Edited by introverter
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11 minutes ago, introverter said:

But the multigrid (even the 12/3000) and multiplus ii both appear on the COCT list of approved equipment, the normal multiplus does not - so from a legal grid-tie scenario the multi-grid and multiplus ii will likely be a safer choice than the multiplus.

Going to take a stab at this, also under correction from the blue experts. I understand the the multi-plus as more of an off-grid inverter/UPS, while the Multigrid and MultiPlusII are designed to manage a mini-grid in the absence of utility power. I'm guessing the MultiPlusII is the more modern version, complying to more recent standards, having current sensors on the utility AC inputs, to control possible feedback to the utility. In any event the advertising says the MultiplusII combines the functions of the Multigrid and the Multiplus, and it is suited to a variety of setups, whether it's combined with PV inverters or MPPT's, either AC coupling or DC coupling.

I see they changed from an aluminium body to a steel body, which may or may not affect longevity depending on the installation environment.

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4 hours ago, GreenFields said:

aluminium body to a steel body

That was mostly for cost reasons. The steel case is still a pretty decent case, but it is significantly cheaper to manufacture. When the MP-II was introduced there was also a clear difference in price, while the old Multiplus 3kVA always sold around the 20k mark, the MP-II came in around 13.5k at the time... and even now is still below the former price of the aluminium one despite major slippage of the exchange rate.

4 hours ago, GreenFields said:

multi-plus as more of an off-grid inverter/UPS, while the Multigrid and MultiPlusII are designed to manage a mini-grid in the absence of utility power

Not really. It is basically the same design, and both the older Multiplus and the newer Multiplus-II have exactly the same capabilities (except for the built-in anti-islanding stuff of course). The differences are that the older Multiplus had two toroids -- one on either side -- while the newer MP-II has a larger single toroid in the middle. This makes the MP-II's no-load consumption much lower. Other than that, there is no difference between the two. The steel-cased version is merely made from more affordable materials.

Moving on then. Let me first point out the main difference. In the pictures above, you will see the MP-II models have two switches in series, while the Multiplus has just one. That's the built-in anti-islanding I already mentioned. Regulations require that you must have two. So that's the first main difference.

There were a total of 9 hardware revisions (maybe more by the time you read this), but there's basically just two main ones, which can be seen in the two left-most pictures. The one had AC-out-2 wired directly to the input side (the picture in the middle). There was no relay to disconnect it, and the only reason to use AC-out-2 is that you could put your non-essential loads on it and have ESS/power assist work without a grid meter.

Then there is the current revision, which returns to the way the older Multiplus did it: Ac-out-2 is on the inverter output, with a relay that drops it when the grid fails.

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8 hours ago, plonkster said:

except for the built-in anti-islanding stuff

I have to add, for clarity, just because these units don't have the double-relay islanding setup, it does not mean they don't island properly. All Victron inverters have LOM detection (loss of mains), and isolate themselves from the grid. The older multiplus however had only one relay, and the regulations (not in all countries, but in many) require two. The regulations also require belt-and-suspender setups, the two relays are controlled by two separate control units that also monitor each other, ie it implements redundancy.

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