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Growatt SPF 5000 ES vs SunSynk 5kVA inverter


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I'm planning a new system and I'm torn between the Growatt SPF 5000 ES or SunSynk 5kVA inverters. I would like to get some opinion and views on those 2 options. I have a prepaid meter, so cannot feed back to the grid. I was very much inclined towards the SunSynk option, because if it's ability to push excess PV power through the AUX port and feed the geyser, until I read on another thread, that AUX uses the batteries, which was a bit of a put off. In the beginning, I planning to use a small battery system - 4 lead acid/calcium Royal batteries with the setup and replace with Lithium batteries later. However, looking at the prices, the Growatt with a 2.4kwh lithium is very close to the Sunsynk cost alone.

What would the forum wisdom advise me in this case? Thanks a lot!

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18 minutes ago, PowerUser said:

I'm planning a new system and I'm torn between the Growatt SPF 5000 ES or SunSynk 5kVA inverters. I would like to get some opinion and views on those 2 options. I have a prepaid meter, so cannot feed back to the grid. I was very much inclined towards the SunSynk option, because if it's ability to push excess PV power through the AUX port and feed the geyser, until I read on another thread, that AUX uses the batteries, which was a bit of a put off. In the beginning, I planning to use a small battery system - 4 lead acid/calcium Royal batteries with the setup and replace with Lithium batteries later. However, looking at the prices, the Growatt with a 2.4kwh lithium is very close to the Sunsynk cost alone.

What would the forum wisdom advise me in this case? Thanks a lot!

There is your answer right there 😆

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41 minutes ago, PowerUser said:

I'm planning a new system and I'm torn between the Growatt SPF 5000 ES or SunSynk 5kVA inverters. I would like to get some opinion and views on those 2 options. I have a prepaid meter, so cannot feed back to the grid. I was very much inclined towards the SunSynk option, because if it's ability to push excess PV power through the AUX port and feed the geyser, until I read on another thread, that AUX uses the batteries, which was a bit of a put off. In the beginning, I planning to use a small battery system - 4 lead acid/calcium Royal batteries with the setup and replace with Lithium batteries later. However, looking at the prices, the Growatt with a 2.4kwh lithium is very close to the Sunsynk cost alone.

What would the forum wisdom advise me in this case? Thanks a lot!

The aux is most usefull when used with a small battery system, as you can set it to supply power when the grid is down and the batteries are for instance above 90%. As long as solar production is more than usage the batterries should stay above 90% and the aux will always supply your load. When there is little to no solar and the grid is off and running off your batteries and the batteries get to 90% the aux will switch off. Another advantage of the sunsynk is you could have minimal load powered from the sunsynk with a small battery and it can still push back power to help power everything else in your house from the solar, this would reduce your electricity bill

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42 minutes ago, De0n19 said:

The aux is most usefull when used with a small battery system, as you can set it to supply power when the grid is down and the batteries are for instance above 90%. As long as solar production is more than usage the batterries should stay above 90% and the aux will always supply your load. When there is little to no solar and the grid is off and running off your batteries and the batteries get to 90% the aux will switch off. Another advantage of the sunsynk is you could have minimal load powered from the sunsynk with a small battery and it can still push back power to help power everything else in your house from the solar, this would reduce your electricity bill

How would you do that? Through the AUX port or some other way?

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3 minutes ago, PowerUser said:

Why do you say that? What shortcomings did you find with the 5000ES?

If you are connecting the entire load of the house to the inverter then the growatt is as good as the sunsynk, if not the sunsynk can still send back power to the house to feed your loads not connected to the inverter.

 

9 minutes ago, PowerUser said:

How would you do that? Through the AUX port or some other way?

It uses current clamp which should be connected before your main db. It measures the power being drawn from the grid and will push back a max of just enough power or how ever much the solar can supply so that no power is drawn from the grid

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18 minutes ago, PowerUser said:

Why do you say that? What shortcomings did you find with the 5000ES?

We shouldn't even be comparing the spf range to the sunsynk. The spf range are offgrid inverters with SUB mode thrown in on top to help you while building your offgrid system. 

Compare the sph 6000 to the sunsynk/deye 5kw and you will see why.

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7 hours ago, De0n19 said:

The aux is most usefull when used with a small battery system, as you can set it to supply power when the grid is down and the batteries are for instance above 90%. As long as solar production is more than usage the batterries should stay above 90% and the aux will always supply your load. When there is little to no solar and the grid is off and running off your batteries and the batteries get to 90% the aux will switch off. Another advantage of the sunsynk is you could have minimal load powered from the sunsynk with a small battery and it can still push back power to help power everything else in your house from the solar, this would reduce your electricity bill

The Growatt also has an AUX port. Though it is limited to 3A/250V = around 700W.

Easy way to get around this limit is to connect all your gear to the main output of the inverter and connect a solenoid switch to the aux output which will power on your excess non-essential loads when the batteries are charged.

Edited by tetrasection
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7 hours ago, PowerUser said:

I'm planning a new system and I'm torn between the Growatt SPF 5000 ES or SunSynk 5kVA inverters. I would like to get some opinion and views on those 2 options. I have a prepaid meter, so cannot feed back to the grid. I was very much inclined towards the SunSynk option, because if it's ability to push excess PV power through the AUX port and feed the geyser, until I read on another thread, that AUX uses the batteries, which was a bit of a put off. In the beginning, I planning to use a small battery system - 4 lead acid/calcium Royal batteries with the setup and replace with Lithium batteries later. However, looking at the prices, the Growatt with a 2.4kwh lithium is very close to the Sunsynk cost alone.

What would the forum wisdom advise me in this case? Thanks a lot!

 

Growatt SPF5000ES + 2.4kwh lithium is the better option BY FAR!

Please don't get the Sunsynk + Royal batteries... Please... 😅

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1 hour ago, tetrasection said:

The Growatt also has an AUX port. Though it is limited to 3A/250V = around 700W.

Easy way to get around this limit is to connect all your gear to the main output of the inverter and connect a solenoid switch to the aux output which will power on your excess non-essential loads when the batteries are charged.

According to the manual, that is a Dry Contact port and not AUX. Are we talking about the same thing?

I have been trying to figure out how to have a setup, where I can use the Dry Contact to trigger such solenoid switch and be able to compliment the non-essential loads with the excess PV power then the batteries are full. So far, I was unable to find information on how to do that (maybe I'm not searching properly). Do you mind drawing a simple diagram for me, in order to explain how to do that? Or if possible someone directly to a link, where such setup is explained in mode details. That would make the Growatt very close to a bi-directional inverter.

1 hour ago, tetrasection said:

 

Growatt SPF5000ES + 2.4kwh lithium is the better option BY FAR!

Please don't get the Sunsynk + Royal batteries... Please... 😅

Why not? There is even a video from the SunSynk CEO, where he says, if you can use a small a battery. The only drawback of the Royals, if I'm not mistaken will be capacity. But anyway, I don't plan to stick with them forever, They are only a temporarily option. Eventually, I would like to build my own LiFePo4 from cells, when the funds are available. 

Edited by PowerUser
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4 hours ago, PowerUser said:

According to the manual, that is a Dry Contact port and not AUX. Are we talking about the same thing?

Same thing AFAIK.

 

4 hours ago, PowerUser said:

I have been trying to figure out how to have a setup, where I can use the Dry Contact to trigger such solenoid switch and be able to compliment the non-essential loads with the excess PV power then the batteries are full. So far, I was unable to find information on how to do that (maybe I'm not searching properly). Do you mind drawing a simple diagram for me, in order to explain how to do that? Or if possible someone directly to a link, where such setup is explained in mode details. That would make the Growatt very close to a bi-directional inverter.

You put your relay switch on the positive wire between your non-essential loads and the inverter's AC output and connect the Aux dry contact to the signal input.

relay.thumb.png.6a3e9dd33f9202888874162091747275.png

 

4 hours ago, PowerUser said:

Why not? There is even a video from the SunSynk CEO, where he says, if you can use a small a battery. The only drawback of the Royals, if I'm not mistaken will be capacity. But anyway, I don't plan to stick with them forever, They are only a temporarily option. Eventually, I would like to build my own LiFePo4 from cells, when the funds are available. 

 

I'm not saying the Sunsynk won't work, I'm saying if you want to get the most out of your money you should go with the Growatt and lithium.

Sunsynk with Royal batteries is like buying a petrol Hilux and using diesel fuel lol. Rather get the petrol Corolla and use petrol fuel.

 

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Off_Grid_Inverter.thumb.png.2eb14b7e6f74cebc8d1d05463b00d57e.png

 

Hi tetrasection, your diagram is oversimplified and won't work in a real world setup. Above, I have drawn to show what I have in mind. So, we need a SMART DEVICE on the output which should split the output in 2 parallel circuits. It should actively monitor the Essential Load and push the rest though the other circuit which goes back to the Main DB through a Relay. If the Dry Contact closes the Relay, that should allow the excess power to feed the Non Essential Load and compliment the power from the Grid. Not sure, if another mixing device is required at the Main DB, in addition to the above. At the same time, we need another device to prevent backfeed to the Grid.

So, can anyone tell me, what can be used as SMART DEVICE 1 to split the load and what can be used as a device to prevent feeding back to the Grid?

And also, if this setup is viable at all with an Off-Grid Inverter like the Growatt?

 

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14 hours ago, PowerUser said:

Off_Grid_Inverter.thumb.png.2eb14b7e6f74cebc8d1d05463b00d57e.png

 

Hi tetrasection, your diagram is oversimplified and won't work in a real world setup. Above, I have drawn to show what I have in mind. So, we need a SMART DEVICE on the output which should split the output in 2 parallel circuits. It should actively monitor the Essential Load and push the rest though the other circuit which goes back to the Main DB through a Relay. If the Dry Contact closes the Relay, that should allow the excess power to feed the Non Essential Load and compliment the power from the Grid. Not sure, if another mixing device is required at the Main DB, in addition to the above. At the same time, we need another device to prevent backfeed to the Grid.

So, can anyone tell me, what can be used as SMART DEVICE 1 to split the load and what can be used as a device to prevent feeding back to the Grid?

And also, if this setup is viable at all with an Off-Grid Inverter like the Growatt?

 

I see what you mean. I was assuming your base load + excess load was within the 5kw limit of the inverter.

For this kind of scenario I would go with the Sunsynk, as it can pass grid power through the inverter in addition to the 5kw that it produces (I think passthrough is 90A, which is almost 20kw).

I don't know much about the AUX limitations on the Sunsynk but you could possibly connect your excess loads to the AUX output so they only turn on when the batteries are full.

If the AUX port is not capable of grid passthrough (or there is a current limit) then you could use the AUX output to signal a relay on your excess loads (which would then be connected to the main output).

You can also connect a second relay to the excess loads with the signal inputs connected to the prepaid meter's output, so that if eskom goes down, your excess loads turn off and prevent inverter overload.

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15 minutes ago, tetrasection said:

I see what you mean. I was assuming your base load + excess load was within the 5kw limit of the inverter.

For this kind of scenario I would go with the Sunsynk, as it can pass grid power through the inverter in addition to the 5kw that it produces (I think passthrough is 90A, which is almost 20kw).

I don't know much about the AUX limitations on the Sunsynk but you could possibly connect your excess loads to the AUX output so they only turn on when the batteries are full.

If the AUX port is not capable of grid passthrough (or there is a current limit) then you could use the AUX output to signal a relay on your excess loads (which would then be connected to the main output).

You can also connect a second relay to the excess loads with the signal inputs connected to the prepaid meter's output, so that if eskom goes down, your excess loads turn off and prevent inverter overload.

Thank you for the reply. I'm almost 100% positive, the SunSynk can achieve the scenario described in the picture.

However my question to everyone in the forum is regarding, if there is anyway to achieve the above with an Off Grid inverter like the Growatt? Does something like "SMART DEVICE 1" described in the picture exist and what could that be?

Edited by PowerUser
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2 hours ago, PowerUser said:

Thank you for the reply. I'm almost 100% positive, the SunSynk can achieve the scenario described in the picture.

However my question to everyone in the forum is regarding, if there is anyway to achieve the above with an Off Grid inverter like the Growatt? Does something like "SMART DEVICE 1" described in the picture exist and what could that be?

Can't find a "current balancing controller" (or whatever this smart box might be called) on google.

You might be able to achieve this with a bunch of current monitoring relays and current limiters but that seems overly complex.

Edited by tetrasection
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3 hours ago, PowerUser said:

Does something like "SMART DEVICE 1" described in the picture exist and what could that be?

Perhaps you could use two contactors to switch between grid and solar as the smart device. I am using a off-grid Axpert inverter and have two change-over contactors. The one feed the essentials and the other the non-essentials. They are controlled with two sonoff switches on my phone. These are set on timers to automatically switch on and off. The aim with this system is to never get the battery charged to 100% SOC because that will mean wasting PV power. My battery is normally full by about 16H00 than there is a bit of wastage for the last hour till battery slowly start discharging again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you all for the replies. At the end decided to go with the SunSynk inverter. Your replies definitely helped me make a better choice. There is couple of limitations, which I still don't like on the SunSynk inverter but for the price seems like, you can't have it all.

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On 2021/07/06 at 11:08 AM, PowerUser said:

Thank you for the reply. I'm almost 100% positive, the SunSynk can achieve the scenario described in the picture.

However my question to everyone in the forum is regarding, if there is anyway to achieve the above with an Off Grid inverter like the Growatt? Does something like "SMART DEVICE 1" described in the picture exist and what could that be?

To answer your question, yes you can achieve that and you will not even need the SMART DEVICE , by just getting two Growatt SPF5000TL inverters and parallel them. It will work out the same in terms of cost but you will have 10Kw with the Growatts compared to only 5kw that you will get with only one sunsynk. You will be able to put all you load on the two inverters and never have to worry about splitting your DB to essential and non-essential loads. Thats what I did and it works perfect, with 3kw geyser ON, you can still cook on your stove, or bake, use washing machine and do other things without any issues  

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8 hours ago, hoohloc said:

To answer your question, yes you can achieve that and you will not even need the SMART DEVICE , by just getting two Growatt SPF5000TL inverters and parallel them. It will work out the same in terms of cost but you will have 10Kw with the Growatts compared to only 5kw that you will get with only one sunsynk. You will be able to put all you load on the two inverters and never have to worry about splitting your DB to essential and non-essential loads. Thats what I did and it works perfect, with 3kw geyser ON, you can still cook on your stove, or bake, use washing machine and do other things without any issues  

 

7 hours ago, Buyeye said:

2 TL's are also around R10k less than the 8kw sunsynk. R10k comes in handy when getting a back up gas geyser.

 

The Growatt SPF 5000TL is very limiting with Max open circuit voltage: 145V DC. That was one of the main reasons, I discarded the idea of using that model.

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