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Sunsynk/Deye Specs - What even is the truth


suds7162

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I've been helping a family member spec out a solar system, which is being installed from today onwards. During this whole process, we've been incredibly frustrated about the inconsistent specifications found on documentation available online. This makes the whole process an exercise in guesswork to a degree, because it makes it difficult to determine what is true and what is not. 

We are specifying a 16KW Sunsynk model, due to the size of the household and power requirements. Have a look at the below image where I compare the Sunsynk with the Deye, and I've highlighted some of the differences we've found.

image.thumb.png.6fa97e00e0f4bb64549aa478bbaadb3b.png

I summarize the differences below:

  • DC Battery voltage: Sunsynk = 43-60V and Deye 40-60V (not a big difference)
  • Max charge & Discharge current: Sunsynk = 300A and Deye = 290A (not a big difference in real-world terms)
  • Max DC Power: Sunsynk = 18KW and Deye = 20.8KW (Almost 3KW more!)
  • Max PV Input voltage: Sunsynk = 450V and Deye = 500V (Big difference, one extra panel and the magic smoke comes out)
  • Start-up Voltage: Sunsynk = 150V, Deye = 125V (Does this mean the Deye is better when it's low sun conditions?
  • MPPT Range: Sunsynk = 250-450V, Deye = 150-425V (Does this mean the Deye is better in low sun conditions?)
  • Max AC output power (on grid): Sunsynk = 16KW, Deye = 17.6KW
  • Max AC Output power (off grid): Sunsynk = 13KW, Deye = 14KW
  • Max Continuous AC passthrough: Sunsynk = 150A, Deye = 100A (That's a  12KW difference!!)

I know these are different models, but from what I understand they are supposed to be identical, with a different label on them? Is this assumption incorrect? The different specs in the below list point to these two models using different components, with different ratings, and they are thus, not really identical at all.

The PV differences are especially concerning, because it comes down to the difference between one or two extra panels if you spec out a string. Is the Sunsynk therefore over-specced and the Deye under-specced? These kinds of inconsistencies make it difficult to understand the limits and capabilities of these models, and it seems most of it is down to suggestion more than anything else.

I don't really have a question; this is more of a rant. But if someone knows what the actual truth is here, that'll be grand. Maybe someone as a 16KW model that has a sticker on it with even more different specs, and we can add to our list of gripes that will fall on deaf ears 😂

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3 hours ago, suds7162 said:

I've been helping a family member spec out a solar system, which is being installed from today onwards. During this whole process, we've been incredibly frustrated about the inconsistent specifications found on documentation available online. This makes the whole process an exercise in guesswork to a degree, because it makes it difficult to determine what is true and what is not. 

We are specifying a 16KW Sunsynk model, due to the size of the household and power requirements. Have a look at the below image where I compare the Sunsynk with the Deye, and I've highlighted some of the differences we've found.

image.thumb.png.6fa97e00e0f4bb64549aa478bbaadb3b.png

I summarize the differences below:

  • DC Battery voltage: Sunsynk = 43-60V and Deye 40-60V (not a big difference)
  • Max charge & Discharge current: Sunsynk = 300A and Deye = 290A (not a big difference in real-world terms)
  • Max DC Power: Sunsynk = 18KW and Deye = 20.8KW (Almost 3KW more!)
  • Max PV Input voltage: Sunsynk = 450V and Deye = 500V (Big difference, one extra panel and the magic smoke comes out)
  • Start-up Voltage: Sunsynk = 150V, Deye = 125V (Does this mean the Deye is better when it's low sun conditions?
  • MPPT Range: Sunsynk = 250-450V, Deye = 150-425V (Does this mean the Deye is better in low sun conditions?)
  • Max AC output power (on grid): Sunsynk = 16KW, Deye = 17.6KW
  • Max AC Output power (off grid): Sunsynk = 13KW, Deye = 14KW
  • Max Continuous AC passthrough: Sunsynk = 150A, Deye = 100A (That's a  12KW difference!!)

I know these are different models, but from what I understand they are supposed to be identical, with a different label on them? Is this assumption incorrect? The different specs in the below list point to these two models using different components, with different ratings, and they are thus, not really identical at all.

The PV differences are especially concerning, because it comes down to the difference between one or two extra panels if you spec out a string. Is the Sunsynk therefore over-specced and the Deye under-specced? These kinds of inconsistencies make it difficult to understand the limits and capabilities of these models, and it seems most of it is down to suggestion more than anything else.

I don't really have a question; this is more of a rant. But if someone knows what the actual truth is here, that'll be grand. Maybe someone as a 16KW model that has a sticker on it with even more different specs, and we can add to our list of gripes that will fall on deaf ears 😂

Although the hardware is the same they may have differentiated it at a software level - they don't HAVE to be the same. Its also likely that one of them is more current than the other (from a documentation and tracking changes perspective)

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On 2023/03/30 at 10:47 AM, suds7162 said:

I've been helping a family member spec out a solar system, which is being installed from today onwards. During this whole process, we've been incredibly frustrated about the inconsistent specifications found on documentation available online. This makes the whole process an exercise in guesswork to a degree, because it makes it difficult to determine what is true and what is not. 

We are specifying a 16KW Sunsynk model, due to the size of the household and power requirements. Have a look at the below image where I compare the Sunsynk with the Deye, and I've highlighted some of the differences we've found.

image.thumb.png.6fa97e00e0f4bb64549aa478bbaadb3b.png

I summarize the differences below:

  • DC Battery voltage: Sunsynk = 43-60V and Deye 40-60V (not a big difference)
  • Max charge & Discharge current: Sunsynk = 300A and Deye = 290A (not a big difference in real-world terms)
  • Max DC Power: Sunsynk = 18KW and Deye = 20.8KW (Almost 3KW more!)
  • Max PV Input voltage: Sunsynk = 450V and Deye = 500V (Big difference, one extra panel and the magic smoke comes out)
  • Start-up Voltage: Sunsynk = 150V, Deye = 125V (Does this mean the Deye is better when it's low sun conditions?
  • MPPT Range: Sunsynk = 250-450V, Deye = 150-425V (Does this mean the Deye is better in low sun conditions?)
  • Max AC output power (on grid): Sunsynk = 16KW, Deye = 17.6KW
  • Max AC Output power (off grid): Sunsynk = 13KW, Deye = 14KW
  • Max Continuous AC passthrough: Sunsynk = 150A, Deye = 100A (That's a  12KW difference!!)

I know these are different models, but from what I understand they are supposed to be identical, with a different label on them? Is this assumption incorrect? The different specs in the below list point to these two models using different components, with different ratings, and they are thus, not really identical at all.

The PV differences are especially concerning, because it comes down to the difference between one or two extra panels if you spec out a string. Is the Sunsynk therefore over-specced and the Deye under-specced? These kinds of inconsistencies make it difficult to understand the limits and capabilities of these models, and it seems most of it is down to suggestion more than anything else.

I don't really have a question; this is more of a rant. But if someone knows what the actual truth is here, that'll be grand. Maybe someone as a 16KW model that has a sticker on it with even more different specs, and we can add to our list of gripes that will fall on deaf ears 😂

Go for 2x 8kw

You get redundancy incase of an inverter fault. 

You get 4x mppt's

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Thanks @Chris_S

The design called for only 2x MPPTs, so the other two trackers will go unused (redundancy, I know), and the cost of 2x 8KWs is >R10K more than a single 16KW model. There were other reasons why we went this route that I can't now exactly remember.

And regardless, the inverter is already purchased and installed.

This thread is more of an after-the-fact-rant, instead of a what-is-the-best-option-for-me-to-buy question.  

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29 minutes ago, suds7162 said:

Thanks @Chris_S

The design called for only 2x MPPTs, so the other two trackers will go unused (redundancy, I know), and the cost of 2x 8KWs is >R10K more than a single 16KW model. There were other reasons why we went this route that I can't now exactly remember.

And regardless, the inverter is already purchased and installed.

This thread is more of an after-the-fact-rant, instead of a what-is-the-best-option-for-me-to-buy question.  

All good. 

You'll be happy with the sunsynk. 😁

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On 2023/03/30 at 10:47 AM, suds7162 said:

MPPT Range: Sunsynk = 250-450V, Deye = 150-425V (Does this mean the Deye is better in low sun conditions?)

In short, no

PV modules do not need direct sunlight to produce Volts (I assume that is wat is meant by low sun conditions)

The amount of current (amps) produced by a PV module is directly proportional to how bright the sun is (irradiance) at the location of the PV module. Higher levels of irradiance will cause more electrons to flow off the PV cells to the load.

The amount of voltage produced by the PV module is also affected by the irradiance value, but not by a lot and is normally of no consequence.

PV modules will wake up every morning with very little sunlight (soon after surise) Because at this stage the sun isn’t actually hitting the array immediately, the modules will not immediately produce any current, which means they will produce volts that is very close to their open circuit voltage.

Is you have enought panels connected to reach the MPPT start up voltage (using oper circuit voltage) your MPPT should wake up very soon after sunrise even though no current is produced. As load gets added (as soon  as direct sunlight hits the PV module and it starts producing current) the volts produced will drop towards the VMP rating.

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