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More power on cloudy days?


ccronje
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Good day,

I was wondering if anyone can explain this to me. I have 3 x 330watt solar panels connected to my inverter, the model as far as I know is WA-330 from Waaree Enterprises.

On warm, clear sunny days I never see more than 127volts available from the solar panels and the inverter never gets more than about 650watts out of them under load. It's almost as if there is some kind of hard limit. However - on colder,cloudy days when I expect to see less power available I often see it go way above that, up to 132volts under no load and 800watts when the inverters uses it.

Can anyone explain this at all...could it be that the warmer days cause some kind of loss of efficiency, or am I just misunderstanding something?

Thanks

Chris

 

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On 2020/05/02 at 1:56 PM, ccronje said:

However - on colder,cloudy days when I expect to see less power available I often see it go way above that, up to 132volts under no load and 800watts when the inverters uses it.

That rise in production is normally for short periods and its called "Cloud edge effect". It typically happens when a cloud clears before the sun and the sun breaking through the edge of the cloud, creates a very bright light. I have seen this last for up to 15 minutes on days with a thin bank of clouds where that same effect is created. 

During cloudy days you should experience high peaks, but in general the overall production for the day would be much less than on a sunny day. 

 

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On 2020/05/02 at 3:35 PM, Jaco de Jongh said:

That rise in production is normally for short periods and its called "Cloud edge effect". It typically happens when a cloud clears before the sun and the sun breaking through the edge of the cloud, creates a very bright light. I have seen this last for up to 15 minutes on days with a thin bank of clouds where that same effect is created. 

During cloudy days you should experience high peaks, but in general the overall production for the day would be much less than on a sunny day. 

 

Thank you, that is very interesting

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On 2020/05/02 at 3:20 PM, GreenFields said:

Panels generally become less efficient as they get hotter. Bright yet cool conditions produce more power. Consider if the panels  are perhaps too close to the roof, airing enough, or catching radiated heat from any other source.

Thanks will look into that

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