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Single or multi stand wires


Antony
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Good morning all,

My building alterations are coming on nicely and I have a good 60m² new roof area for panels B).

I'm now at the stage of installing new plugs switches and lights in the house extensions and I was wondering what is preferred, single or multi strand wires for plugs (and lights)?

I see all the old wiring is multi stand but the new wires seem to be single.

What is the best to use?

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4 hours ago, Johandup said:

Surfix is mostly (?) a single wire.  

4mm and up (capable of 32A) Surfix is multi-strand, or that is my experience. Probably because it becomes a bit too thick for a single strand. 1.5mm seems to be single-stranded (but only good fir lights). So far all the 2.5mm surfix I've seen (good for plugs) was also single-stranded.

The main reason for using a single strand is that it is cheaper to make. The main reason for using multiple strands is that it is more flexible. Which is probably why they kick over to multi-strand at 4mm... otherwise it becomes difficult to draw/handle.

Additionally surfix can be put directly into the wall, which is another cost-saving thing.

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On 2018/11/25 at 3:44 PM, plonkster said:

4mm and up (capable of 32A) Surfix is multi-strand, or that is my experience. Probably because it becomes a bit too thick for a single strand. 1.5mm seems to be single-stranded (but only good fir lights). So far all the 2.5mm surfix I've seen (good for plugs) was also single-stranded.

The main reason for using a single strand is that it is cheaper to make. The main reason for using multiple strands is that it is more flexible. Which is probably why they kick over to multi-strand at 4mm... otherwise it becomes difficult to draw/handle.

Additionally surfix can be put directly into the wall, which is another cost-saving thing.

I vaguely  remember learning something in school about the differences between multi and single stranded but can't for the life of my remember the exact details.  DC is generally always multi stranded, doesn't matter the size and there is a technical reason for this. I guess it's time to go look it up again. 

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17 hours ago, Noobie said:

Use stranded wire and PVC conduits glued at the joints. Believe me, one day when you want to pull another circuit to a point in your house you will be able to do so with ease.

Provided you have used a 25mm conduit - mine is full of wires and we had to go the surfix route....

Never say never....

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Is there a better way of "joining" wires for multiple plug points than using connector strips? 

These things are iffy at best with the easy at which the screws strips.

I have 4 plugs coming from 1 isolator, so instead of feeding to 1 plug, then the next (daisy chain) I want to feed from a central point (from isolator to 4x4 wall box with cover in roof then split to 4 plugs).

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1 hour ago, Antony said:

Is there a better way of "joining" wires for multiple plug points than using connector strips? 

Hi Anthony, When ever I do a normal Home installation (AC) and I need to  split a circuit to different plug points I use these. I only use this method if i cannot just daisy-chain the circuit.   Connector strips tend to form loose connections over time, they heat up, melt away and cause all sorts of problems over time. 

873639222_screwit.PNG.18961f9ff68611603c22faad472a74b6.PNG

It is called Screw-its and is available from electrical wholesalers as well as some hardware store. Fairly inexpensive and very effective. There is  2 sizes available, i always buy both. you il see the small one works on thin or few wires  and the larger size when you use thicker or more wires. 

Clean the ends of the wires you want to join, twist then together and screw this porcelain cap over them tightly. Sometimes I even put a few turns of insulation tape to hold the cap in place. Not needed, but just as a extra safety. 

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1 hour ago, Antony said:

Is there a better way of "joining" wires for multiple plug points than using connector strips? 

A common method is to join the wires using a barrel-type uninsulated ferrule. I am not an Electrician, so the following are just observations and may not be the proper/legal way to do this 😉 

Notes:

  • One must select a Ferrule that is just big enough to fit all of the wires (it should fit snugly before crimping).
  • For crimping multiple wires together, insert all wires from the same end of the Ferrule, with the stripped section going all the way through the barrel.
  • Crimp the ferrule on both sides of the middle notch with a proper crimping tool.
  • Double check that all wires are properly secured and cannot move or be pulled out of the ferrule (give all of them a good tug)
  • Cover the ferrule with a few layers of insulation tape. 
  • This connection must be done inside a connector box with a separate compression gland for each cable.

Ferrule.jpg

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2 minutes ago, NigelL said:

I am not an Electrician, so the following are just observations and may not be the proper/legal way to do this 😉 

Hi Nigel, nothing wrong with this way. legal and very long lasting. Does not allow you lean-way for expansion or changes, but it surely can work  , especially if you you know the installation is final and will never change. 

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1 hour ago, Jaco de Jongh said:

Hi Nigel, nothing wrong with this way. legal and very long lasting. Does not allow you lean-way for expansion or changes, but it surely can work  , especially if you you know the installation is final and will never change. 

I use ferules even if I know we're still working there, since they won't come loose (unless improperly crimped) and I know it won't cause a fire in-case we need to leave the joint like that for a while. Those screw on terminals might come loose due to whatever reason and I don't want to be blamed for any problems. 

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3 hours ago, SilverNodashi said:

Those screw on terminals might come loose due to whatever reason and I don't want to be blamed for any problems.

Lol, did you ever try to remove one that was correctly installed? Clearly not.......

Edit: And for the record, I have been using them for 28 years, never experienced one issue. 

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1 hour ago, Jaco de Jongh said:

Lol, did you ever try to remove one that was correctly installed? Clearly not.......

Edit: And for the record, I have been using them for 28 years, never experienced one issue. 

You think you know me, right? Wrong. Stop insulting and judging me if you don't know me. I have removed them. Just cause you're the only sole in the world who do it right, doesn't mean others also do it right. 

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19 hours ago, Jaco de Jongh said:

Hi Anthony, When ever I do a normal Home installation (AC) and I need to  split a circuit to different plug points I use these. I only use this method if i cannot just daisy-chain the circuit.   Connector strips tend to form loose connections over time, they heat up, melt away and cause all sorts of problems over time. 

873639222_screwit.PNG.18961f9ff68611603c22faad472a74b6.PNG

It is called Screw-its and is available from electrical wholesalers as well as some hardware store. Fairly inexpensive and very effective. There is  2 sizes available, i always buy both. you il see the small one works on thin or few wires  and the larger size when you use thicker or more wires. 

Clean the ends of the wires you want to join, twist then together and screw this porcelain cap over them tightly. Sometimes I even put a few turns of insulation tape to hold the cap in place. Not needed, but just as a extra safety. 

does this have to be in a box?

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20 hours ago, SilverNodashi said:

Those screw on terminals might come loose

I think I figured out my confusion. I read that as screw in terminals. These screw terminal things do get loose for some reason, so I thought nothing about it. I frequently mistype this word myself.

But if it was actually meant as screw on terminals (what the Americans call wire-nuts), then yes, I have never heard of them getting loose.

This might well be a simple misunderstanding and everyone just needs to 1) learn to type properly, 2) learn to read properly, 3) apply some damn charity :-)

</soapbox> :-P

Edited by plonkster
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