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time control sw axpert


Gabriël
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sudo python hibrido.py QPIGS

('Comando=', 'QPIGS\xb7\xa9\r')
['228.0', '49.9', '228.0', '50.0', '0000', '0000', '000', '356', '25.31', '000', '057', '0678', '0000', '025.3', '25.34', '00001', '10010110', '00', '03', '00000', '000']
 

This is an example. I send "QPIGS" and I receive that information. Also, you can send comands to set a lot of things

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ok, what i would like to happen is that the axpert switches off grid at around 0300 and take all loads from the batteries until say 1700.  depending on the clouds, charging starts from 0800 until 1700.

the loads can be supplied from the grid between 1700 and 0300.

if the batteries need some top up after 1700 grid will provide this via the axpert.

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Here you have "set" commands:

3 Setting parameters Command

PE/PD: setting some status enable/disable

PF: Setting control parameter to default valueF

POP: Setting device output source priority

PBCV: Set battery re-charge voltage

PBDV: Set battery re-discharge voltage

PCP: Setting device charger priority

PGR: Setting device grid working range

PBT: Setting battery type 

PSDV: Setting battery cut-off voltage (Battery under voltage)

PCVV: Setting battery C.V. (constant voltage) charging voltage

PBFT: Setting battery float charging voltage

PPVOKC: Setting PV OK condition

PSPB: Setting Solar power balance

MCHGC: Setting max charging current

MUCHGC: Setting utility max charging current

POPM: Set output mode (For 4000/5000)

 

 

It shouldn´t be complex what you want to do

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If you are going run according to a strict time schedule why not put the inverter in "UPS" mode  and the turn it on or off with a "Geyser" timer , it will handle the load , that is if you have a single Axpert. 

My self run my inverter for two years with a relay and a WIFI switch that would power the the relay. That would also gave me the option to switch to grid remotely if need be. Low tech but never had any problems with it. Also I was never a big fan of switching the inverter with software commands but that's just me. 

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6 hours ago, gabriel said:

hi!

apart from icc, is there any other sw which can achieve time control on the axpert 5kva?

 

Jaryd has one that works well called Solar Patrol or MPPT Solar Patrol and Pepe has Lucibus.....he charges for his new software now, but his early work is still for free.

index.png

solar patrol.PNG

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47 minutes ago, gabriel said:

sal die timer die job doen?

Limited to between 12A and 20A (depending on load characteristics)... which might be a tad limiting?

Also, my experience with these timers is that they don't last. About 18 months in or so they always seem to check out...

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On 2018/12/10 at 1:48 PM, PaulF007 said:

If you are going run according to a strict time schedule why not put the inverter in "UPS" mode  and the turn it on or off with a "Geyser" timer , it will handle the load , that is if you have a single Axpert. 

My self run my inverter for two years with a relay and a WIFI switch that would power the the relay. That would also gave me the option to switch to grid remotely if need be. Low tech but never had any problems with it. Also I was never a big fan of switching the inverter with software commands but that's just me. 

As matter of interest, do you suggest putting a timer on the inverter input and thus cut the feed to the inverter, forcing it to use batteries?

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9 hours ago, gabriel said:

yip

ok, so then Paul's suggestion would work as low-tech, but use a higher rating relay, say 32A for your 4Kw inverter. 

ICC can also do it, but then you need a Raspberry Pi and ICC license. 

Or, you could do it with the commands @Javi Martínez suggested, using a Raspberry Pi. 

 

You can set the charge priority to Solar Only mode at say 17:00, and back to SBU at say 03:00. I have to play with the commands to tell you how to format it, but it would be the "PCP" command. On a Raspberry Pi you could simply create two python scripts, one to put it into solar only mode, and another into SBU mode, then schedule the commands to run at the time you wish. With a Pi you could go one step further and use some formulas to change the time every day by a few minutes (I forgot how much it moves every day) to "follow the sun", so to say. 

 

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5 minutes ago, SilverNodashi said:

Or, you could do it with the commands

as i told @Chris Hobson, it is too late in my life for the pi option - i am retired and am NOT going to learn any programming [or mandarin for that sake:P], the low tech and k.i.s.s.  principles have now firmly established themselves. that does not mean i disrespect guys like @ebrsa for their active participation in a variety of disciplines - i've just moved into other pastures.

so here is my angle:

ok, so here is my argument; please flame it, i mean who likes raw arguments ;-)
you have pvs, an inverter, batteries, loads and utility.
you want to get the max roi, i.e. energy from the sun [let's ignore wind, thermal spring, swamp gas or whatever]
where i am most days are sunny, in other words i do not need battery/utility unless it is overcast. i want to enter nightfall with full batteries as our utility, eskom, has been mismanaged and stolen bankrupt and can only be relied on for increasing power outages.
so i assume there will be enough light to carry load and charge the batteries by say 1700 in summer. 
from then until about 0300 i want eskom to provide electricity if they can - if they cant its ok, my capacity can carry me even through the night.
now my inverter does not have a timer build in telling it when it should go on or off grid - switching is being done by other variables than time.
in order to enable the batteries to work a bit if eskom is available, the feed from eskom to the inverter must be cut. this i want to happen at around 0300. the batteries carry the load until the pvs are activated who then charge the batteries and carry the load from about 0800 until 1700, at which stage the eskom feed will be re-activated and start to supply load, which might include charging the batteries if they need top-up.
for this switching i only need a programmable 30a in rail switch - if possible, but not necessary, wifi control. the manual ones go for between zar200-400. so even if i have to replace every two years it is ok.
until here it was more or less techno-speak, what follows is more psychobabble :-)
compared to 'bells and whistles' software and supporting cables, electronic devices and endless tweaking and staring at displays and worrying about whats and ifs not only costing an arm and other extremities but in fact consuming valuable [quality] time which could be spent with people, a simple solution like the above seems a win-win situation...

ok, i will sit down and await comments

God bless :D

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1 hour ago, gabriel said:

as i told @Chris Hobson, it is too late in my life for the pi option - i am retired and am NOT going to learn any programming [or mandarin for that sake:P], the low tech and k.i.s.s.  principles have now firmly established themselves. that does not mean i disrespect guys like @ebrsa for their active participation in a variety of disciplines - i've just moved into other pastures.

so here is my angle:

ok, so here is my argument; please flame it, i mean who likes raw arguments 😉
you have pvs, an inverter, batteries, loads and utility.
you want to get the max roi, i.e. energy from the sun [let's ignore wind, thermal spring, swamp gas or whatever]
where i am most days are sunny, in other words i do not need battery/utility unless it is overcast. i want to enter nightfall with full batteries as our utility, eskom, has been mismanaged and stolen bankrupt and can only be relied on for increasing power outages.
so i assume there will be enough light to carry load and charge the batteries by say 1700 in summer. 
from then until about 0300 i want eskom to provide electricity if they can - if they cant its ok, my capacity can carry me even through the night.
now my inverter does not have a timer build in telling it when it should go on or off grid - switching is being done by other variables than time.
in order to enable the batteries to work a bit if eskom is available, the feed from eskom to the inverter must be cut. this i want to happen at around 0300. the batteries carry the load until the pvs are activated who then charge the batteries and carry the load from about 0800 until 1700, at which stage the eskom feed will be re-activated and start to supply load, which might include charging the batteries if they need top-up.
for this switching i only need a programmable 30a in rail switch - if possible, but not necessary, wifi control. the manual ones go for between zar200-400. so even if i have to replace every two years it is ok.
until here it was more or less techno-speak, what follows is more psychobabble 🙂
compared to 'bells and whistles' software and supporting cables, electronic devices and endless tweaking and staring at displays and worrying about whats and ifs not only costing an arm and other extremities but in fact consuming valuable [quality] time which could be spent with people, a simple solution like the above seems a win-win situation...

ok, i will sit down and await comments

God bless :D

Yes, with the KISS approach this will work with a relay. but, and there's always a but (on either side of the coin) it may not work flawless. You might have to adjust the time on the timer during the different seasons.

And, what happens if the batteries run flat during the night? Will you wait it out, manually switch back to Eskom (if you're awake / home), or rather have it switch back automatically to Eskom? If the latter, you could make use of the dry contacts to activate a Normally Open relay. In laymen's terms, it will stay open (no Eskom) after the sun has set and then only close the contacts when the batteries run low (programmable on the Axpert).

Or go a step  further: Set the inverter to SBU so both Solar and Eskom will keep the batteries fully charged between say 16:00 and 17:00 when you want to switch over. Then the relay disengages. With this approach you can't use the dry contact to re-engage the relay when the batteries run flat, and I am not sure if you get a contactor with a 24hour timer function that could be used instead. A contactor is basically a electronically controlled relay - i.e. one relay controls a bigger relay. I suspect you would need to have a circuit made up, in such a way that if the dry contact of the inverter kicks in (first relay) it can activate the contactor (bigger relay). I suspect the easiest would be to have a bypass circuit that bypasses the timed relay. The timed relay will then simply stick to it's time schedules. BUT I haven't tested this. Perhaps @pilotfish have done something like this before?

 

 

This is why I would rather go the software route - you program (Or get someone to do it for you ;) ) the inverter to switch to solar only mode after a certain time and back again after a certain time. I know ICC has that feature, but you said you don't want to use Windows, nor a Raspberry Pi (I could setup one for you and you just plug it in if it helps).

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2 hours ago, SilverNodashi said:

Yes, with the KISS approach this will work with a relay. but, and there's always a but (on either side of the coin) it may not work flawless. You might have to adjust the time on the timer during the different seasons.

And, what happens if the batteries run flat during the night? Will you wait it out, manually switch back to Eskom (if you're awake / home), or rather have it switch back automatically to Eskom? If the latter, you could make use of the dry contacts to activate a Normally Open relay. In laymen's terms, it will stay open (no Eskom) after the sun has set and then only close the contacts when the batteries run low (programmable on the Axpert).

Or go a step  further: Set the inverter to SBU so both Solar and Eskom will keep the batteries fully charged between say 16:00 and 17:00 when you want to switch over. Then the relay disengages. With this approach you can't use the dry contact to re-engage the relay when the batteries run flat, and I am not sure if you get a contactor with a 24hour timer function that could be used instead. A contactor is basically a electronically controlled relay - i.e. one relay controls a bigger relay. I suspect you would need to have a circuit made up, in such a way that if the dry contact of the inverter kicks in (first relay) it can activate the contactor (bigger relay). I suspect the easiest would be to have a bypass circuit that bypasses the timed relay. The timed relay will then simply stick to it's time schedules. BUT I haven't tested this. Perhaps @pilotfish have done something like this before?

 

 

This is why I would rather go the software route - you program (Or get someone to do it for you ;) ) the inverter to switch to solar only mode after a certain time and back again after a certain time. I know ICC has that feature, but you said you don't want to use Windows, nor a Raspberry Pi (I could setup one for you and you just plug it in if it helps).

I agree. Sending and receiving data to Axpert, it is easy to know battery voltage and depending on the time it is, to send parameters or others. 

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2 hours ago, SilverNodashi said:

And, what happens if the batteries run flat during the night?

i believe the pylon internal bms will prevent this, not so @Chris Hobson? so i wake up, no power... torch out, gas on, escape via battery powered garage door and gate motor or sit and wait for sun or eskom.

3 hours ago, SilverNodashi said:

you program (Or get someone to do it for you ;) ) the inverter to switch to solar...

that's a wonderful proposition BUT as soon as i want to change things and my BEPF [best ever programmer friend] is on his annual three week pilgrimage to tibet  ... :huh:

3 hours ago, SilverNodashi said:

You might have to adjust the time on the timer during the different seasons.

now that i do not mind as i walk past the setup a couple of times a day

regarding the switch i believe this model will do the trick

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5 minutes ago, gabriel said:

that's a wonderful proposition BUT as soon as i want to change things and my BEPF [best ever programmer friend] is on his annual three week pilgrimage to tibet  ... :huh:

 

I used the above examples I posted for months without any issue. And they are very simple to setup......

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