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Gnome

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Gnome last won the day on January 22

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  1. Does the mains side have a fuse and is that still in tact? (ie. the part the plugs into the wall). "Pro"-tip: Test fuses with you multimeter using continuity mode. A fuse may look ok, but you'll want that confirmation beep that is is good.
  2. I think what @Coulombis trying to say is, you have a clone/copy/fake of the real thing. If it doesn't work with the software they provide or software of the company they ripped off, you are probably out of luck. Not many people are going to want to create software for a clone. Partly because it is disgusting that they rip-off another company but mostly because the clones have bad build quality. So most people with clones end up needing to replace them soon anyway. You aren't paying much less and you are getting a worse product. So not worth buying the fake. You probably didn't know you bought a fake, so it may be worth seeing if you can get a refund and buy the real thing.
  3. Inverters intended to run appliances direct typically have this arrangement. They intentionally put plug outputs on the inverter and not a connection point like inverters intended to be connected to your home. There is no neutral, there are two phase wires 180° apart (so 2 phase). The earth on those inverters is not floating as you suggest and truly has a 110v potential in respect to the midpoint ("earth"). It is similar to generators with v-o-v configuration and cannot be safely connected to a house. I'm pretty sure the inverter you have is not intended to be connected to a home. It is an appliance inverter, so you connect your devices directly to it. The actual manual that came with your inverter? Because Victron sell a lot of products. I have my doubts your exact product is intended for the application you are using it. The description I see on the web-site is
  4. Gnome

    1

    Yeah sadly no, unless you rip the battery apart. Which means you spent a bunch of money, lose your warranty, need to probably buy a new BMS (R2-3k) and then put it all together which is actually quite a bit of work.
  5. Gnome

    1

    What were you hoping for? Turning a single 24v battery into 48v?
  6. What would be great is if they could actually provide a plan where you can never earn money, only reduce your 30 day window expense. So in other words, they'll never owe you money, but if you have enough export, neither will you owe any money. I think a LOT of people would be happy with that arrangement and they get free power. But ofc our government only thinks about the loss of revenue so will never happen. (given there is now talks of increasing prices for any home with solar by 1000%)
  7. Battery voltage depends on the chemistry. LFP specifically refers to LiFePO₄, so it isn't LFP at all.
  8. Gnome

    1

    You will need 2 as pointed out, but you also need to make sure the battery supports series. Internally Lithium batteries have BMS which has a maximum voltage rating. So it is critical to ensure the product documentation indicates that BMS support series operation.
  9. Some amount of products it is easy you just take it back. That is not how it works with a lot products. You warranty is with the manufacturer. I've many times returned hard-drives to the manufacturer. Returned angle grinder directly to the manufacturer. Printers, laptops, the list goes on. Even cars are provided by the manufacturer. So maybe the "simple few" actually have experience with this sort of thing. I've actually worked in a family business before and needed to field warranty claims for many retail products. Also CPA, etc. is really meaningless. You think it protects you, but in reality the CPA backlog is in the years. They only go after big fish and cut and dry easy cases. I've also gone the small claims court route when I was still a student, it was many hours of effort over months. Then the store refuse to pay even with a judgement. Then back to court to get cost order. Then to police to get property attached (and police don't really actually want to do it, they are lazy so you best know where they need to go). Overall the effort is HUGE and every step costs money. So no CPA and SA laws really don't protect you. In theory they do, in practice the effort is so high that it 99.9% of people (wisely) walk away and learn from it.
  10. Hmm, I'll be honest, I don't buy a lot of other products that I care too much about the warranty (that isn't electronic in some way). This practice isn't really tied to South Africa. I also find it is most common on products with "longer" warranties.
  11. The problem is largely that you create alternative circuit paths that aren't predictable. AC is electrons moving back and forth between two conductors. And the only reason we call on of those legs neutral is because that leg has been tied to a ground somewhere (so earth is at the potential of that leg). But ultimately the electrons don't care if you call it neutral or live (or rather the electromagnetic field induced by electrons, but we'll simply say electrons to keep it simple). They follow the path of least resistance. And if that path is some whacky connection you created that flows back through all kinds of alternative routes (first your neutral bond, then your earth bond then back over another neutral and so on and so on), it means that when a circuit breaker is switched off, it may not actually be switched off like you thought, because current is able to move through your wacky alternative route. That is especially scary when you have for example a double pole breaker and you expect there is no way current can possible flow, but hey turns out your neutral isn't actually disconnected. And sure you can analyse and think about but it becomes really complex really quickly. Even tho AC never moves in any direction, we think of it as moving from live to neutral between the circuit breaker. Alternative routes breaks that logic and you start talking about it "moving backward" through alternative paths. The reason for not creating multiple earth bonds is for this same reason. You don't want current flowing through alternative paths, some before circuit breakers some after, etc. The next guy who works on it thinks the circuit can't possible be energised, touches something, completes circuit and ouchie time (or even death time) In the UK they use these ring circuits and there are plenty of videos online walking you through the crazy sh#t you can see happen with those to give some food for though of how even something as simple as a plug circuit becomes far more complicated because you went and created circular neutral and line conductor circuits.
  12. Does your neutral from Eskom/Utility also connect to that same neutral bar? If yes, just put it on its own tiny little bus bar for the few things that need it. If your Eskom neutral doesn't have a busbar (ie. neutrals are running directly from circuity break to circuit breaker then no issues.
  13. Run two wires to the inverter and two wires back. I assume your incoming power goes straight from your main switch to your inverter? So your inverter output should first go into the mandatory change over (and obviously your Eskom supply should also have a neutral and line conductor going into that change over). The common output of the change over then supplies your DB board/panel/whatever EDIT: I see Communica also sells the changeover I linked to. I have also tried the ACDC brand changeover and it is complete garbage. While tightening it I was able to strip off and break the screw that go into the terminals. And given that loose connectors are the no.1 problem that causes fires in DB, I would not trust it.
  14. Yes they shouldn't be bonded. Your neutral from different power sources shouldn't be bonded. Note power sources. Doesn't matter if you term them essential or non-essential or whatever. What does matter is what the current source is. If one source is an inverter and battery bank and another source is a utility, their neutrals are not interchangeable and should be kept separate. Just because a suicide plug works normally doesn't make it correct. I mean surely you can understand that? Just because you didn't die today driving without a seatbelt doesn't mean that it isn't stupid. See what I'm saying?
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