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Automotive amp meter


Chris Louw
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So I assume one of those old round Dial type meters, It should work as it only has 2 connection pins and basically uses a shunt for Amps. No 12V light for illumination to be used, and the accuracy on those things are debatable at best, but just for indication of current direction it should be good.

 

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Generally the rule is not to use automotive stuff for >30V applications. But that's usually for stuff like switches and fuses, where higher voltages means larger arcs. For an ampere meter that obviously doesn't apply. So the short answer is that I don't know, but I probably wouldn't do it.

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Tend to agree with @Riaanh & @plonkster, the Voltage is probably not relevant since it is a current meter for DC (ie: no induction, just a shunt). From your description it sounds like it doesn't have a illumination/globe. Just bear in mind that it will most likely be quite inaccurate down the low end of the current range, so can only really be a basic guide. But I am curious about what you have that is 105 Volts DC? I wouldn't try use this on the PV side though, the internal resistance is unknown so if a MPPT controller is involved then it could play havoc with it's logic. Battery side only. Does it not have any writing on it, or a picture?

Edited by KLEVA
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KLEVA my multimeter is good for only 10 amp . My 18 panels is combined on the roof in groups  of 6 panels ( 3 x 2 ) .There is a combiner box in the ceiling where the 3 strings is combined with the surge arrestors next to the trap door . It would be nice for me to compere the incoming amps of the different groups of panels ( age difference of 3 years between 1st and last panels ) . Thanks if it does not work I will buy another .

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9 hours ago, KLEVA said:

Voltage is probably not relevant

At some point it becomes relevant. That point where it is high enough to jump from point A to point B, or more specifically, in a fault condition where things are already getting a bit heated or maybe even a bit wet and the clearances just aren't enough. With switches and fuses this is critical. With a meter it is probably not so critical. I am inclined to think that you'll probably be fine though.

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