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SunSynk / Deye inverter using power from grid


Sammyigt
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Hi guys

If any of you are familiar with the SunSynk / Deye range of inverters you will surely have come across the fact that while grid suppply is available they have a constant draw from the grid of around 200w which i figure is the power used to keeo the inverter on.

I consider this a bit of a design flaw and dont understand why they cant use PV power during the day as there own power source.  It doesn't display on the inverter as a load (grid power in will read 0w (or around 20w depending on how much you have your zero export power set to) but a clamp meter on the incoming supply will tell you a different story.

Now, when the invertee switches to island mode naturally grid input does drop to zero and the inverter becomes self sustainable and independent from the grid.

So my question is, has anyone had any success in achieving a true zero import from grid while grid is available?  My ideas at the moment are a bit outrageous and far fetched but wanted to see if anyone else has come across this and has a simple solution.

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Don't have a clamp meter but my electricity meter is the spinning disk meter. I have seen that the disk actually does not move and it does not use anything from the grid if the zero export is set to zero. 

Clamp meters can also be faulty. Is your municipal meter actually ticking over. Assuming you have all loads on the inverter. 

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Inverter is running in off grid configuration so no on grid loads exist.  It's a minimal amount (like i said, around 200w) so you wont notice this on a spinning disc meter.  But have three of these in parallel, all of a sudden it becomes 600w.

Even with zero export set to 0w it still consumes the 200w. 

I recall somewhere that SunSynk prefer to use an energy meter rather than the actual CT clamp provided with the inverter. Most likely due to the effectiveness of the CT clamp? 

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1 hour ago, Sammyigt said:

Hi guys

If any of you are familiar with the SunSynk / Deye range of inverters you will surely have come across the fact that while grid suppply is available they have a constant draw from the grid of around 200w which i figure is the power used to keeo the inverter on.

I consider this a bit of a design flaw and dont understand why they cant use PV power during the day as there own power source.  It doesn't display on the inverter as a load (grid power in will read 0w (or around 20w depending on how much you have your zero export power set to) but a clamp meter on the incoming supply will tell you a different story.

Now, when the invertee switches to island mode naturally grid input does drop to zero and the inverter becomes self sustainable and independent from the grid.

So my question is, has anyone had any success in achieving a true zero import from grid while grid is available?  My ideas at the moment are a bit outrageous and far fetched but wanted to see if anyone else has come across this and has a simple solution.

Hello Sam, yes, I have a 5.5K Sunsynk and the grid power draw is configurable from 0W to 420 W using the ZeroExport Power in the System Mode screen. I have used 0W and it does exactly that, no draw from the grid. I don't have a very fussy prepaid meter and it allows me to operate in this mode for days on end.

I was advised by Sunsynk support that my setting it to zero wasn't good and that I ought to allow it to use at least 20 to 50W. Their reasoning (the way that I understood it) was that as with any UPS system, it needs to sync with any AC sources. If during the evening, for example, and hypothetically, there was a fault with the batteries, then there would be no solar to draw from, and it would be better for the inverter to have a measurable quantity, however small, of the grid AC sinewave, in order for the sole source (grid) to provide the UPS with the ability to remain alive without any drama. The argument sounded quite logical, and made sense to me, with my (admittedly very basic) understanding of UPS systems.

So I set it to 10W continuous grid draw and it has worked like that for many months. Yes, I am stingy like that 😁

Hence I am quite surprised at your statement that it chews up 200W?

Edited by YellowTapemeasure
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1 hour ago, Sammyigt said:

Inverter is running in off grid configuration so no on grid loads exist.  It's a minimal amount (like i said, around 200w) so you wont notice this on a spinning disc meter.  But have three of these in parallel, all of a sudden it becomes 600w.

Even with zero export set to 0w it still consumes the 200w. 

I recall somewhere that SunSynk prefer to use an energy meter rather than the actual CT clamp provided with the inverter. Most likely due to the effectiveness of the CT clamp? 

What kind of municipal electric meter do you have? 

If the inverter is taking from the grid your municipal will show this. 

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  • 8 months later...

I have a Dye 5kW inverter and it also draws power from the grid. I my case +-350W. This while the sun is shining and  it is charging the battery at 1.5 kW. Its own CT measurement shows 0 most of the time. My inverter is set to "load first". No charging from the grid is done or set up.

If I would now switch on the stove (non essential load) that uses about 1.2 kW the power drawn from the grid can go op to 700W.

The total inverter load at this point is well below 5kW so it is not a case of running out of capacity.

I have a electronic municipality meter and it shows a error when pushing power back. In this case there is no error shown. I measure the inbound thick red wire with an Owl Electricity meter. I also verified, with great effort, that the municipality meter increases accordingly - there is a bit of a discrepancy with the Owl but not significant.

After playing with settings for days on end and after I contacted the service centre, I just gave up. Bought another Lithium battery and disconnected it from the grid.

 

 

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A clamp meter will only be able to measure apparent power. Under grid-tied mode an inverter may only generate with a power factor of 1 (with some tolerance). So the reactive part of your load will be offloaded to the grid. This means there will be current flowing, but your meter should not measure any consumption, as it should only measure real power.

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